Category: Family Names

a Name Sage post by: Abby View all Name Sage posts

Update: Cora’s brother has a name!

They gave their first two daughters traditional, feminine A names. Should they stick with that style – and letter! – or try something new if their next baby is a girl?

Holly writes:

My husband and I are happily expecting our third (and last) child in October of this year. We have two girls, Amelia (Mia) Noelle and Alexandra (Lexi) Seeley. While we don’t know the gender of this little one, I have a strong inclination that we will have three girls in our future.

If we do have a boy, we’re all set. We’ve had our boy name picked out for nearly a decade.

Girl names however, turn into a word association game. I’m not convinced we need to go with another name that starts with A, though my husband seems to think that this little one will be left out if we don’t. I can’t find any that I absolutely adore; like yes, but not enough to say “That’s the name!”

We have Aurora, Anastacia & Audrey. Other names we’ve discussed are McKenna (DH likes McKenzie which I don’t), Julianna, Teagan, Tarryn, Lochlyn, Grey (a variation on our chosen boy name), Oriana (DH says it reminds him of Oreos), and Leigha/Leighton.

I know our girl names both start & end with A’s as well as they are princess/royal names. Middle names always come from somewhere in the family.

Please help! I feel like this little one will be nameless forever.

The Name Sage replies:

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a Name Sage post by: Abby View all Name Sage posts

What to do when your last name rules out nearly every first name you love? An Australian reader turns to the Name Sage to solve the puzzle of a not-too-religious boys’ name that works with Lo.

Ping writes:

I’ve been reading your Name Sage posts keenly, hoping one might help us out. But our problem feels unique, and I’m getting genuinely worried, so I’m plucking up the courage to write in with our dilemma.

We’re pregnant with our third – and final – child, whose sex we’ve decided not to find out. We like the surprise!

We currently have two boys, named Archie and Jesse.

The kicker is, their surname is Lo. Turns out, it’s the HARDEST name to work with! Here’s why:

– Any names starting with B, F, G, or S would sound out as blow, flow, glow and slow!

– Names ending in ‘s’ or ‘x’ also roll into Lo awkwardly, making the sound ‘slow’.

– Names ending in vowels, especially if they contain ‘L’ in them, sound too sing-song.

So many of our favorite names fail these basic tests: Sasha, Leo, Louis, Seb, Benjamin. The only possibilities we have in mind are Roland – but is Rolly Lo too much? – and Reuben.

We have a few girls’ names in mind, but are stuck for boys’ names. Please help!

The Name Sage replies:

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By Clare Bristow

Where do you get naming inspiration from? One of my favorite things in the world of names is learning the stories behind why parents choose the names they do – that’s part of what makes the monthly Babyberry announcements so much fun to read.

The news this week features names from lots of different sources, from family to food to far-flung countries. Whether you’re suffering from namer’s block or just curious about where parents get their ideas from, here are some stories for you.

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The Great-Grandparents Baby Name Rule

By Nancy Man

A baby name becomes trendy for one generation. For the next two generations, while those initial babies are parent-aged and grandparent-aged, you can expect the name to go out of style. But during the third generation, once the cohort reaches great-grandparent age, the name is free to come back into fashion.

Evelyn is a name with a usage pattern that fits this description well.

I’ve seen it described elsewhere as the 100-Year Rule, but I prefer to call it the Great-Grandparent Rule, as it makes more sense to me to frame it in terms of generations.

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unusual family names

by Pamela Redmond Satran

My grandfather’s middle name was Owen, which was pretty unusual when I was growing up. I never thought back then that I’d name a son Owen, much less that Owen would become a Top 50 boys’ name!

What’s the most unusual name in your family? Can you imagine it ever coming back into style? Or maybe it’s so rare it was never in style in the first place.

We’d love to hear its origins, if you know them: How it was chosen, how the bearer felt about it, and whether Great-Uncle Oral inspired any namesakes.

We’d also love to know whether you’d consider using it as a name for a baby? A middle name? Do you love your unusual family name? Hate it? Why or why not?

For a wider look at unusual vintage baby names, check out our lists of lost names of 1916 for boys and for girls.

Get one of these awesome personalized family trees, unusual names and all, from the Etsy shop karuskicolours.

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