Category: Boy Names

Abby Berry Juice profile image

Boy Baby Names: Can Remy Be Saved?

a Name Sage post by: Abby View all Name Sage posts

They have the perfect name for their next child – if they can resolve spelling and pronunciation challenges. Can it be done, or should they move on to another choice?

Marie writes:

My husband’s family has a great name that has been passed down (to boys only so far) for many generations: Remy. I love names that aren’t too common, are familiar, pack a good historical punch (either familial or popular history), and feel nice to say.

The only holdup is that the family pronounces it Ray-mee. My husband’s family has been in the US for many generations, originally from Belgium. My mom’s side of the family is very French. To them, this pronunciation sounds like an Anglicized version of the French original (which it likely is). I’m not French enough to feel comfortable committing to the ‘r’ rolling French pronunciation.

So … is there any way we can salvage this name? I think this name could work for either sex and aside from a bit of confusion, no one in my husband’s family would be insulted by a different take on the name.

I think an obvious solution would be to use the “Rem-mee” pronunciation and maybe use the Remi spelling to signal that it is an ode to Remy but a different name. I need some convincing on this though.

Our older son has a name that has two possible pronunciations. I am constantly correcting people. If possible, it would be a bonus to find a name with a straightforward pronunciation and spelling … which might be challenging with this name!

The Name Sage replies:

Read More

Abby Berry Juice profile image

Bold Boy Names: How about Thor?

a Name Sage post by: Abby View all Name Sage posts

Should they name their son Thor? He’s big on the heroic heritage pick, but she fears it might be too much name for a mere mortal.

Mary writes:

I’m writing with an odd conundrum. My husband is dead set on naming our son Thor.

My husband’s family is Norwegian and very proud of their heritage though they’ve been in the US for several generations. My father-in-law is named Thor. My husband is one of the few men in his family without a clearly Scandinavian name. He’s Kurt, with family members called Lars, Per, Nils, Ole, Bjorn, and even Torbjor.

But he doesn’t want just any Scandinavian name. He wants to name his son after his father.

I shut down the possibility the minute we started talking about marriage and kids. I adore my father-in-law, and he wears his name well. He even loves Thor movie memorabilia.

Therein lies my problem. I fell asleep during the Avengers movie. My favorite names are Henry, Thomas, Jack, August, or Jude. Maybe something from a novel. I don’t want to explain for the rest of my life that he wasn’t named after a superhero. I can’t stop thinking about the looks I’d get from other parents. (I know I shouldn’t care, but I do.) Plus, we plan on having more than one child. What would we possibly name a sibling for Thor?

And yet, since we found out we were having a boy, Thor is starting to grow on me! I love seeing how excited it makes my husband to talk about how much my father-in-law would love it. I know a little boy would probably love to be named Thor, and now a tiny part of my brain is considering it, which I never thought would happen. Am I going crazy? Can I name a child Thor? Should I?

My husband is very stubborn about using it as a middle name, and Henry Thor doesn’t have a great ring to it.

Read More

Baby Name Trends 2018

baby name trends 2018

By Pamela Redmond Satran

We head into 2018 following a year of surprises: The rise of powerful women after the fall of the first female presidential candidate, unexpected heroes (and villains) on the world as well as the theatrical stage, a new emphasis on truth as well as strength.

For Nameberry’s 2018 baby name trends, that means it’s time to get serious. In the year ahead, we predict a stronger taste for heroic names for both daughters and sons, increased flexibility in using names to equalize the genders, and a more adventurous search for names that have deep roots but feel fresh in the modern world.

Read More

100+ Boys’ Names You Don’t Know

unique boy names

by Pamela Redmond Satran

These rare baby names are the boys’ answer to the 100+ obscure girls’ names we brought you last week.

This A to Z collection of more than 100 highly unusual names for boys includes international choices and names from familiar sources like the Bible, ancient names along with names that are  newly-minted.

What they have in common, besides the fact that you’ve probably never heard them? They’re all names you should know and — if you’re truly adventurous — may even want to use. Which of these rare boys’ names would you pick, if this were the entire universe of names?

Read More

By Linda Rosenkrantz

To commemorate Hannukah, the Jewish 8-day “festival of lights” — when eight candles are lit to celebrate the miracle that a small quantity of oil to light the ancient Temple’s menorah lasted eight days—we seek some Old Testament boys’ names that are in the sweet spot, meaning names that are well used enough to be familiar and on the Social Security list but down below the Top 100.

With Noah as the Number One boys’ name (given to 19,000+ baby boys last year), and followed by others in the Top 25– Benjamin, Jacob, Elijah, Ethan, David, Joseph, Samuel and Gabriel–it might seem that all the good Old Testament boy names might be taken—or at least taken by multiple thousands of newborns each year. But, take heart!– if you’re the kind of parent who doesn’t want such a popular name for your son, there are lots of other great biblical boy names that are considerably less common.

Listed below are some of those choices—a few of them quite surprising– starting from the least popular ones, those positioned in the lower depths of the Social Security list, and ending with those that are higher up but still below the Top 100. 

Read More