Category: Baby Name News

Baby Name Trends of the Week

By Clare Bristow

In the news this week: two new tennis babies, lots of names beginning with E and M, and some memorable word names.

Tennis babies

Serena Williams welcomed a daughter a few weeks ago, and she’s just revealed her name: Alexis Olympia. Alexis’s first name matches her father, Alexis Ohanian, and while we don’t know their reasons for picking Olympia, it feels like a good fit. It’s sporty, it’s mythological (tenuous link alert: like Serena’s sister Venus!), and it sounds almost like the much-more-popular Olivia. I can see Olympia appealing to more parents – can you?

Another new arrival in the tennis world is Tara, Novak Djokovic’s daughter. Novak and his wife already have a son called Stefan, whose name is a nod to the church where they were engaged and married. I’d love to know if there’s a story behind Tara’s name.

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Starbaby Names: The Latest Predictions

By Sophie Kihm

When it comes to naming siblings, families have different approaches. Some choose an obvious theme, like Coleen and Wayne Rooney, whose children are named Kai, Klay, and Kit. Others, like Lisa and Jack Osborne, don’t feel the need to have coordinating sibling names—one of their daughters has the sweet, vintage name Pearl, and the other has the androgynous, spunky nickname name Andy.

It will be interesting to see how this group of celebrities adds to their sibsets. Will Boomer Phelps have a sibling with an equally out-there name? Will Kim and Kanye use another word name for North and Saint‘s brother or sister? I’ve made my predictions below, but I’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments.

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By Clare Bristow

This week’s news includes names damaged by hurricanes, baby names fit for a prince or princess, matchy first and middle names, and how to handle reactions to your child’s name. 

Hurricane names: The fall of Harvey, Katrina, and Irma

Hurricanes are so destructive on lives and property that it may seem silly to be concerned their negative effect on baby names, but perhaps not to people with the name Katrina, Sandy, and now Harvey and Irma. Use of the name Katrina fell by 85 percent after the terrible hurricane that struck New Orleans in 2005. Now the baby name Harvey, which was just coming back into style in the US after a nearly 70-year downturn, is likely to face the same negative fate. And the name Irma is not even going to get her shot, if she ever had one. Sandy was popular enough for long enough that it may escape over-identification with the storm of that name. But anyone named Katrina, Harvey, and Irma will be plagued by hurricane jokes for many years to come.

Royal baby names: Britain and Sweden

You’ve probably heard that William and Catherine, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, are expecting their third child. The world is already placing bets on what George and Charlotte’s little brother or sister will be called.

The best analysis I’ve read is Elea’s predictions – the top contenders include Alice and Arthur. From everything we know about the royal couple, we wouldn’t expect anything outrageous, so the odds of them calling their baby Brexit or Daenerys are roughly zero.

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By Linda Rosenkrantz

Not quite as many announcements as usual this month, but still a really interesting bunch. The boys were a particularly international crew, from Bruno to Eamonn to Sven. And of particular note was an amazing set of sibling middle names: Hummingbird, Nightingale, Mayflower and Wildrose! But what was perhaps most striking was a boy named Wren for the second month in a row!

There was one set of boy-girl twins in August: Avalyn CoraRose and Alban Isaiah.

Here’s the complete list.

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Predicting the Next British Royal Baby Name

By Eleanor Nickerson

After much murmuring and supposition over the last few months, it is now official that the third royal Cambridge baby is on the way.

There are many potential royal baby names that Baby #3 could have, but a more important question to ask is: What do we know about the Duke and Duchess’s established naming style?

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