Category: Baby Names Advice

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Boy Baby Names: Can Remy Be Saved?

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They have the perfect name for their next child – if they can resolve spelling and pronunciation challenges. Can it be done, or should they move on to another choice?

Marie writes:

My husband’s family has a great name that has been passed down (to boys only so far) for many generations: Remy. I love names that aren’t too common, are familiar, pack a good historical punch (either familial or popular history), and feel nice to say.

The only holdup is that the family pronounces it Ray-mee. My husband’s family has been in the US for many generations, originally from Belgium. My mom’s side of the family is very French. To them, this pronunciation sounds like an Anglicized version of the French original (which it likely is). I’m not French enough to feel comfortable committing to the ‘r’ rolling French pronunciation.

So … is there any way we can salvage this name? I think this name could work for either sex and aside from a bit of confusion, no one in my husband’s family would be insulted by a different take on the name.

I think an obvious solution would be to use the “Rem-mee” pronunciation and maybe use the Remi spelling to signal that it is an ode to Remy but a different name. I need some convincing on this though.

Our older son has a name that has two possible pronunciations. I am constantly correcting people. If possible, it would be a bonus to find a name with a straightforward pronunciation and spelling … which might be challenging with this name!

The Name Sage replies:

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a Name Sage post by: Abby View all Name Sage posts

They’re naming daughter number three, and feeling backed into a corner. Is the pattern they’ve established unbreakable? Or do they have more options than they think?

Hanna writes:

I have a bit of a dilemma. My husband and I have backed ourselves into a corner with our older girls’ names, Emma and Bella – two names that have a double letter and end-in-a. If this baby is a boy we plan to name him after his father, but if it’s a girl, we don’t have a clue.

I’m not a fan of -enna or -anna names as they sound too much like Emma, and any Ella names are obviously out because of Bella.

DH has suggested Netta, which I am not a fan of, and Nessa has already been used by a friend. At this point, I don’t even know that there is a name that fits our criteria, but I don’t want the new baby to feel left out if her name doesn’t match her sisters.

Names we do like outside of our theme include Lily, Meredith, Hazel, Pia, and Kate. The middle name will be Guinevere.

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Naming a Boy if You’ve Only Had Girls…

By Melissa Willets

After picking four girl names, for me the prospect of picking a boy name feels almost as overwhelming as being pregnant for nine, long months. Seriously, no sushi or rosé until August?

Indeed, naming a child of the gender opposite to what you’ve become accustomed to is no easy task. After a few girls or boys, you may find it almost impossible to identify a moniker that fits. Here are some things to consider when picking a boy or girl name if you’re an experienced parent, but are new to team blue or pink.

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Bold Boy Names: How about Thor?

a Name Sage post by: Abby View all Name Sage posts

Should they name their son Thor? He’s big on the heroic heritage pick, but she fears it might be too much name for a mere mortal.

Mary writes:

I’m writing with an odd conundrum. My husband is dead set on naming our son Thor.

My husband’s family is Norwegian and very proud of their heritage though they’ve been in the US for several generations. My father-in-law is named Thor. My husband is one of the few men in his family without a clearly Scandinavian name. He’s Kurt, with family members called Lars, Per, Nils, Ole, Bjorn, and even Torbjor.

But he doesn’t want just any Scandinavian name. He wants to name his son after his father.

I shut down the possibility the minute we started talking about marriage and kids. I adore my father-in-law, and he wears his name well. He even loves Thor movie memorabilia.

Therein lies my problem. I fell asleep during the Avengers movie. My favorite names are Henry, Thomas, Jack, August, or Jude. Maybe something from a novel. I don’t want to explain for the rest of my life that he wasn’t named after a superhero. I can’t stop thinking about the looks I’d get from other parents. (I know I shouldn’t care, but I do.) Plus, we plan on having more than one child. What would we possibly name a sibling for Thor?

And yet, since we found out we were having a boy, Thor is starting to grow on me! I love seeing how excited it makes my husband to talk about how much my father-in-law would love it. I know a little boy would probably love to be named Thor, and now a tiny part of my brain is considering it, which I never thought would happen. Am I going crazy? Can I name a child Thor? Should I?

My husband is very stubborn about using it as a middle name, and Henry Thor doesn’t have a great ring to it.

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Anglo-Spanish Sister Names

a Name Sage post by: Abby View all Name Sage posts

They’re naming a sister for Mila Aby. After finding a name rich with meaning and family significance for their firstborn, they need something every bit as spectacular for their new arrival.

Mariana writes:

My husband, Justin, and I are expecting our second daughter in January. Our first daughter is Mila Aby. Our list also included Kiara and Eliana, but we settled on Mila. We love it’s meaning (hardworking, dear, and short for “milagro” or miracle in Spanish), and the fact that it’s short, sweet, and familiar without being overly popular. Aby was what we called my late grandmother, so we chose that as her middle name.

Now we are expecting another girl and planning on again choosing a few names and waiting to meet her before we make our final choice. However, we are having trouble finding names that we definitively want to add to the list. A few that we have thrown around and not nixed include Nora, Leila, and Hannah. I have always loved Olivia and the nickname Liv or Livy, but it’s too popular for our taste.

The name should sound beautiful in both English and Spanish, as much of my family only speaks Spanish. We would also like the name to pair well with Mila, and we are considering Alice for a middle name – my husband’s late grandmother.

I can’t wait to hear what your thoughts are!

The Name Sage replies:

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