Category: Trends and Predictions

By  Mélissa Delahaye of Jolis Prénoms

With French baby names, two clear trends have emerged in baby naming: short, simple, two-syllable names and the return to vintage/ancient names. With a heavy preponderance of girl names ending with -a and the growing success of biblical names, there are many overlaps with U.S. trends. French parents are also largely returning to tradition when it comes to naming their children, and old-fashioned names are making their comeback. Name popularity goes in cycles and a growing number of French parents are exploring the branches of their family trees to find inspiration.

Here is a selection of classic names that are either on the rise or already big hits in France, but not as well used in the US:

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Nameberry’s Unique Baby Name Trends

By Esmeralda Rocha

We know how much the Nameberry community loves stats! So we thought you’d enjoy a bit of analysis as to how the US Top 100 compares with the Nameberry community’s Top 100.

First, a few basics:

In 2017, the US Top 100 and the Nameberry Top 100 shared about half of the names. In general, the less popular a name is in the US the less likely it is to appear in the Nameberry Top 100 (all of the USA Top 10 girls names and most of the USA Top 10 boys names are in the Nameberry lists). However, this is largely where the similarities end…If you compare the two lists, a few interesting  trends emerge:

Of the names that appear in both charts, the Nameberry ranking is often the inverse of the Top 100 ranking. Names that were very popular in Nameberry were quite low in the Top 100 list, and vice versa:

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Top City Names For Babies

Looking for a name that sounds worldly and sophisticated? You might want to try looking at a map or atlas. More parents than ever are picking finding baby name inspiration from mountains, countries and, especially, cities.

Here’s how popular city names have become: There are now more girls under the age of 18 named Madison in the U.S. than there are people living in the city of Madison, Wisconsin. That’s over 250,000 Madisons!

It’s never been clear, though, which cities have gotten the most love in the baby name arena — until now. Nameberry pored over baby name popularity data from the Social Security Administration  to find the 51 city names that were given to the most babies in the year 2016, the most recent available.

Because many of these names are inherently unisex, we haven’t broken down the list by gender. But we did indicate names that were given almost exclusively to one gender by the color of the letters — pink is girls, blue is boys and orange is the truly unisex.

We had to make some tricky judgment calls on which names did or did not count — we excluded Petra, for instance, because it’s not a functioning city today, even though it was at one time. And we do realize that many parents who pick, say, Alexandria or Kobe, aren’t thinking of the cities. But if you think we missed something crucial, tell us in the comments! (Note: This blog was posted very briefly in April, before most of you got a chance to see it.)

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By John Kelly

The Social Security Administration’s 2017 baby name data is now in, charting the Top 1000 names on its card applications for newborns dating back to 1880. They also help track our ever-changing tastes  and trends in baby names.

One of those trends suggests that we’re increasingly enamored with some lovely—and sometimes unlikely—girl names ending with -ley and and its variants. So move over Ashley. Everly has arrived.

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When it comes to baby names, we live in a nation divided. There’s the United States of Ava and William (the South), the United States of Olivia and Oliver (the Great Plains) and the United States of Emma, Liam and Noah (most of the rest: coastal population centers, the Great Lakes, the Southwest, Texas).

That’s what the Social Security Administration revealed when they released the 2017 list of the most popular names in each state on May 17. Though Emma and Liam were the most popular baby names in the country, they were the number one names in only 11 states. In the other 39 (plus D.C.), another name took the cake for boys, girls or both. We made maps illustrating the winners in each state.

The maps look fairly close to last year’s maps of the most popular names in each state. The South remains completely devoted to Ava and William. Pennsylvania was a bellweather yet again, while Vermont again marched to the beat of its own drum.

Yet there were also some fascinating differences. Though many believe we’ve already passed Peak Emma, it actually spread its dominance this year, becoming the most popular girls’ name in several big new states, such as New Jersey and California. And Charlotte, confined last year to New Hampshire, spread to two more states in New England; we wouldn’t be surprised if it continued to spread.

On the boys’ side, several of the states that supported Noah switched over to Liam — which makes sense, given that Liam took over from Noah as the most popular boys name of the year. Noah was the most popular name in just five states, down from nine the year before. Oliver, meanwhile, continues to grow. It was the most popular boys’ name in a whopping 12 states, despite being only the ninth most popular boys’ name overall.

Here’s the map showing the results for girls:

And here’s the map showing the results for boys:

What were the most popular names in your state? Does that line up with what you’ve noticed? Tell us in the comments!

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