By Linda Rosenkrantz and Pamela Redmond Satran

Irish baby names appeal to a wide range of parents, whether your background is Irish or not. But the Irish baby names most popular here are very different from those that are hot in their homeland. St. Paddy‘s Day is the perfect moment to look at the top Irish baby names today.

Irish names have, of course, long been popular in America, brought here by immigrants from the middle of the nineteenth century through the present day.

There have been waves of popular Irish names in the US, starting with such stalwarts as Patrick and Bridget and moving through Kelly and Kevin, Shannon and Sean.

Today, the top Irish baby names are very different in both places from those in the past. Let’s take a look and see how they compare.

Here are the Irish baby name currently in the US. Top 100:

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10 Names the Boys Should Steal Back

By Linda Rosenkrantz

You can always count on a few titters when people hear that macho John Wayne’s birth name was Marion. They’re not aware that when he was born in 1907 Marion—also the name of an infamous Washington DC mayor– was Number 106 on the boys’ list–which also included Leslie, Aubrey, Harley, Merle, Carroll, Cleo, Clair, Lynn, and Pearl (the real name of Wyatt Earp) in the Top 400.

All those names plus many more modern ones have gone to the girls, leading to a lot of talk about gender inequality, of this being a one-way street. Well, maybe it’s time to reverse that trend, for boys to reclaim some of the names they’ve lost.

It’s probably too soon for a name like Ashley, which was the fourth most popular name for girls just a few years ago, or the patronymic Addison, which reached Number 11 in 2010, and for others like Avery and Aubrey that are climbing for girls as we speak. And some once-male-accepted names like Vivian and Evelyn have been seen as strictly feminine for far too long to ever come back.

But here are a few that are not as high on the pink list, some with strong male namesakes, that well might be ready to cross back into the blue, and conceivably work for a 21st century boy.

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Girl Names: In Love with Olivia

By Abby Sandel

Not only has Olivia been a Top Ten favorite for the entire twenty-first century, it’s currently the second most popular name for girls born in the US, just a tick behind Emma.

If you’re in love with Olivia, but aren’t wild about your daughter sharing her name, here’s a solution: seventeen gorgeous girl names, all starting with O and ending in –ia. But not a one of these cracks the current US Top 100. In fact, most of these names fall far outside of the Top 1000.

Instead of Olivia, consider:

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An Anglophile’s Guide to Baby Names

british baby names

by Pamela Redmond Satran

Baby names are in general a lot more adventurous in the US than they are in the UK, with American parents using word names and place names and surname-names and gender-ambiguous names in far greater numbers than their British counterparts.

But British parents tend to be broader-minded when it comes to using vintage names with more history than gloss. Some of the names that might be considered dowdy and old-fashioned by Americans – Constance and Hubert, for example – are chic in London.

A recent review of birth announcements produced this list of names favored by contemporary parents in Britain. If you love vintage baby names that are also distinctive, you may find your perfect name here.

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By Abby Sandel

We’ve always loved word names. Just ask the Pilgrim parents who chose Faith and Hope, the early twentieth century Opals and Earls, or the children of the 80s named Amber and Crystal.

Word names have boomed in the 21st century. Some are revived from the past – welcome back, Ruby and Jasper. Others have some history of use but have never enjoyed so much popularity. Even more word names feel brand new.

Over the last week, word names were in the air. The WWE’s Brie Bella shared that she plans to name her new daughter Birdy. Expectant ESPN reporter Samantha Ponder’s older daughter is called Scout. And Names for Real spotted a baby Pepper in New York.

Let’s take a look at word names that are popular on Nameberry – far more popular than in the US. None of these appear in the current Top 1000, but every one of them could crack the list soon. Given the popularity of choices like River and Chase, Autumn and Lily, any one of these could be the next big thing.

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