Category: Unusual Baby Names

baby names

By ClareBristow

This week’s news includes Scotland‘s new top names, for girls and boys, starbaby names inspired by a café and a golf course, a TV sibset like no other, and controversy over honor names.

Honor names: yea or nay?

Where do you stand on names that honor someone? Are they a must, a must-not, or a nice bonus if things work out that way?

When all goes well, an honor name can be a great gift, linking a child to their family or the people most important to their parents. But sometimes things go wrong. This week, a grandmother writing to Dear Amy was upset that her granddaughter’s name honored everyone (she felt) except her.

Meanwhile in Afghanistan, a father has been criticised by people way beyond his family for giving his son a controversial name. His children are called Fatima, Karim, and Donald Trump. The issue isn’t so much US politics as the fact that it’s not a Muslim name, but dad is adamant he won’t change it. To him, the name represents financial success: he chose it before the 2016 presidential election, after reading the man’s advice books.

You might not have to fight battles over honor names, but if you’re wondering if it’s a path you want to take, these tips on when not to use an honor name might help you decide.

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A Middle Name to Grow Into

name Sojourner

by Eva Sojourner Dunsky

On the playground, I remember my friends and I trying to guess each other’s middle names.  It didn’t take long to arrive at the Elizabeths and Maries, the Annes and the Lynns. But no one ever guessed mine.

“It starts with an ‘S’,” I conceded.  My friends scrunched up their faces, thinking hard.


Not quite.

My parents named me ‘Eva Sojourner’, a name which used to embarrass me, as the Sojourner we learned about in school was a famous African-American abolitionist and I am none of those things.  ‘Sojourner’ literally means ‘one who travels,’ and they wanted me to live an adventurous and full life — you know, get out and see the sights. This makes sense to me now.

It didn’t back then. Amongst my friends, it became a running joke that my middle name was something too weird to be uttered out loud.  

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Irish Baby Names 2018

Irish baby names

by Pamela Redmond Satran

Irish baby names only continue to get more popular in the US, with Liam, an Irish short form of William, at Number 2 on the boys’ list, all forms of Aiden continuing to be widely-used, and surname-names Riley and Kennedy popular for girls.

Other new Irish names increasing in style and popularity include Finn and Declan on the boys’ side, Maeve and Saoirse for girls, and Finley and Quinn among the most popular unisex baby names.

But what is the next wave of Irish baby names prime to emigrate beyond their Emerald Isle? What new names can you use, whether you’re looking to honor your Irish heritage or simply love the sound of Irish names? Luckily, the supply of fresh and appealing Irish names seems never-ending.

Here, the new crop of Irish baby names to consider in 2018.

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Enchanted Names for Boys

By Katinka

“Unusual but not weird” — anyone who’s spent any amount of time on the Nameberry forums will recognize this phrase. At times, it can seem like the whole world and his wife are on the hunt for the exact same thing: an appealing (but not popular), on-trend (but not trendy), wearable (but not predictable) baby name with a solid history, which is both universally familiar and felicitously underused… Phew!

Fortunately, there’s an absolute wealth of wonderful lists on the site which cater to those rigorous requirements: try Cool Classic, Rare Biblical, Exotic Lite… or how about some more off-the-beaten-track themes like Jazz, or Steampunk, or even Pixar-inspired names? All different styles, but all on the trail of that most elusive of baby-naming beasts: the perfect “stands-out-fits-in” choice.

But what if you don’t want something that fits in at all?

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The Top Welsh Names in Wales

By Eleanor Nickerson

The are many Welsh names that have become staples in the English-speaking world, like Owen, Megan and Dylan. But which Welsh baby names are popular for Welsh parents?

A cursory glance at the top names in both England and Wales shows many of the same favourite choices, but, dig a little deeper, and Wales‘ Celtic heritage and separate language becomes apparent, with names almost exclusively found inside Wales alone. For one thing, Welsh has its own phonetic rules for letters of the alphabet which don’t always match English. That’s why the Welsh Top 200 has spellings which — to English speakers — look like “creative” spellings, but to Welsh parents are most compatible with their mother tongue: Harri, Tomos, JacAlys, Ela, Lili, Efa to name a few.

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