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20 Brilliant Boy Names Starting with B Waiting to be Discovered

Baker, Bellamy and Brown

By Linda Rosenkrantz

B names for boys are led by Benjamin, which entered the Top 10 in 2015, but there isn’t another B name in the boys’ Top 60. So let’s give a little love to this neglected initial and look at 20 B names way beyond Brandon and Brayden that are waiting to be discovered.

20 Boy Names Starting with B

BakerAn appealing but utterly overlooked occupational surname name that evokes the aromatic smells emanating from a warm oven. Lots of surname namesakes, from writer Nicholson to actor Simon to jazz great Chet.

BanyanA strong and attractive tree name less obvious than Oak or Pine or Maple. The giant Banyan is the national tree of India, where it provided shade for village meetings and figures in mythology.

BardoA unique o-ending name with a poetic beginning, Bardo is a German saint’s name. Sandra Bullock used it in the middle for her son Louis. Other possibilities: Bard, Baird

BarnabasYou may already have Barnaby on your list, but how about Barnabas? It has New Testament cred, a stylish ‘s’ ending, and a place in TV history via Barnabas Collins in Dark Shadows. Barnabas is a Top 800 name on Nameberry.

BartholomewA weighty New Testament, apostolic, sainted, Shakespearean, Dickensian, Dr Seussean and Gossip Girl choice that hasn’t been used much for a century. And if nickname Bart is too Simpson for you, you can try the vintage Tolly.

Basil—Quintessentially British Basil was a Top 400 name in the US up through the 1930s, when he exited the country. Maybe the fact of Mick Jagger picking it as one of the middle names for his new son Deveraux (after his father) could inspire a reentry. Everybody loves the nickname Baz.

BaxterAn English occupational surname for a baker, Baxter has that irresistible ‘x’ in the middle, and was actually found on early 20th century popularity lists. Caveat: There have been a few fictional canines named Baxter.

Beacon—This might be a real discovery—a word name more secular than similar sounding Deacon and with an illuminating light-filled image.

BellamyA handsome, rhythmic surname name with the great meaning ‘fine friend’ that came to the fore via the main family name in the Upstairs, Downstairs TV series. Bellamy would make a nice cousin name for all those Bellas and Belles out there, in tune with the three-syllable surnames now in style.

BertieThis jaunty nickname for all names ending in bert is currently standing alone at Number 305 in England and Wales, but has seen no signs of returning in the US, where it’s been gone since the 1940s, after having a long run– for girls. A past royal nickname in the UK, singer Kate Bush used it for her now grown son (with Albert on the birth certificate).

BirchQuite different from sturdier tree names such as Oak and Pine, Birch has a slender, more graceful image. It was borne by father-son US senators named Birch Bayh, the younger of whom was a principal sponsor of the ERA.

BixLike other names ending with X, Bix is distinctive and energetic., and could be a hero name for jazz lovers of the great Bix Beiderbecke—whose birth certificate name was Leon.

BoazIf you know too many Noahs, consider this livelier and less used Old Testament name. Boaz, the biblical second husband of Ruth, was common among the Pilgrims, is now Number 55 in the Netherlands and 407 on Nameberry. Hip nickname Bo is a plus.

BooneFrom its association with Daniel Boone, this name has a lean and lanky feel to it, and that combined with its positive meaning—a boon being a blessing, brought it into the Top 1000 in 2015. Other references: the character of Boone Carlyle on Lost, business magnate T. Boone Pickens, and starbaby Boone McCoy, son of country singer Eric Church.

BramThere’s something undeniably charming about Bram, which is both a more distinctive than Abe nickname of Abraham and an independent Dutch and Irish name. Most memorable bearer is Dracula creator Bram Stoker, and there was also a Bram on The West Wing. Number 15 in its native Netherlands, it’s 533 on NB.

BranchAn extension of the tree category, Branch fits right in with the trending strong single-syllable boys’ names. Branch (born Wesley Branch) Rickey will always be remembered for his role in breaking baseball’s color barrier.

BrownAn earthly yet sophisticated color name that would make a rich middle name choice. Surname namesakes include California Governor Jerry, immortal soul singer James, singer-songwriter Jackson Browne and numerous others.

BreccanAlso spelled Brecken and Breckin, this is an appealing, underused Irish saint’s name meaning ‘freckled’. The Berries place it at Number 402, while the Brecken spelling is ranked on the national list at #725.

BrunoThanks in part to Bruno Mars, this o-ending German name meaning brown is beginning to catch on internationally—it’s at Number 710 in the US, 493 on Nameberry, and in the Top 100 in Spain, Portugal and Germany. Bruno Mars, btw, was born Peter, but given the Bruno nickname when he was two.

BusbyWe like this surname name if only for the cool retro nickname Buzz. Busby Berkeley was the innovative choreographer behind many great early Hollywood musicals.

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10 Responses to “20 Brilliant Boy Names Starting with B Waiting to be Discovered”

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MelanieCora Says:

December 27th, 2016 at 12:36 pm

Bellamy has been on my boy list for so long! I am so glad that it is getting some recognition, especially as a boy’s name! I picked up the name from the novels by Kass Morgan and the CW television show “The 100”. Bellamy Blake is a strong carrier of the name. Not that it should require that, the meaning is enough to put it at number 1 on my list despite complaints from others that it sounds girly.

I also really love Breccan/Brecken. I always get some looks when I bring this one up because not many people have heard it. I love the sound and the nickname Brec/Breck!

jpruitt76 Says:

December 27th, 2016 at 4:01 pm

How about Burke? I have always liked this on a boy and it’s still pretty uncommon.

mill1020 Says:

December 27th, 2016 at 4:48 pm

Hm, I’m liking Boone because of the association with boon/gift. And I like the sound of Banyan, too. I’m not sure about Brown; that one might be pushing it.

southern.maple Says:

December 27th, 2016 at 10:55 pm

There are some good ideas here. I particularly like Bellamy, Boone, Bram, and Breccan. However, I’m not sure that I would call Branch, Brown, and Busby “brilliant” names for boys. Brown seems like it would be especially awkward as a first name given the racial connotations.

lesliemarion Says:

December 28th, 2016 at 11:00 pm

I think Brown would only be considered racist if you considered Brown a bad thing. To me, it’s just like Auburn, Cerulean, or Gray: a pretty color.

I also like:

Balfour
Brogan
Brychan
Bronislaw
Buchanan
Bertram
Brahams
Brynmor
Bramwell
Benedick
Bonaventure
Bechet
Boston
Benedict
Benicio
Balthazar
Bailey
Benvolio

kalanigirl Says:

December 29th, 2016 at 9:26 am

I named my little one Basil! I chose it for its uniqueness, and I’m so in love with it, but it’s surprising to me how few people have heard of it in the US.

Megan_Janaya Says:

December 29th, 2016 at 10:32 am

Benjamin is my absolute favourite “B” name but I also like :

Barnabas
Barnaby
Bartholomew
Beau
Brandt
Brennan
Brenner
Brett
Bryant

There are also some more I like but they would be quite well known.

ARead Says:

December 31st, 2016 at 9:54 am

Breccon is probably my favorite of these, it has a nature-y vibe to me because of the Brecon Beacons, a Welsh mountain range. From other berries’ lists here, Brynmor and Brychan are intriguing.

LittleMiss79 Says:

December 31st, 2016 at 5:31 pm

You missed out BROOKE! Maybe most would categorise this as a female name these days but in history it is a transferred surname (also a water name which in my opinion makes it unisex). Sir Brooke Boothby (1744-1824) was an English baronet and wore the name well. I’m also liking ‘Brynmor’ (also just ‘Bryn’, which is Welsh). But I have to admit I chuckled at ‘Burke’ suggested above as here in the UK a ‘Burke’ (also ‘Burk’, ‘Berk’) is ‘a stupid person’!

pixieparty Says:

January 5th, 2017 at 5:31 pm

Our son was born in October and we named him Brogan so needless to say, I’m a big fan of uncommon B names 🙂

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