By Linda Rosenkrantz

Before we dig into our turkey and cranberry sauce, sprouts and yams and pumpkin pie, it’s always a nice tradition to stop and take stock of our blessings, sometimes sharing them around the table. And maybe this is a good time too, to consider some baby names that embrace the very meanings of blessing, grateful, and thanks.

These twelve names may come from many different cultures, from Italian to Jewish to Welsh to Zimbababwean, all embracing the universal warmth of gratitude we feel for the blessing of our babes..

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By Clare Bristow

This week’s news includes Ninja Turtles, hyphenated names, and inspiration from Portugal and Iceland.

Celebrity baby girl names: Mabel and Alana

If you’re looking for a sweet feminine name, this week’s celebrity births might inspire you.

Mabel Jane is the new daughter of actors Ashley Hinshaw and Topher Grace. Gently vintage without being frilly, both her names are fmiliar but not super-popular: Mabel is #513 and Jane is #279. Mabel is one to watch, though: it’s risen fast since re-entering the top 1000 in 2013, and it’s just outside the top 100 on the Nameberry chart.

Portuguese footballer Cristiano Ronaldo welcomed a daughter, Alana Martina. She joins siblings Cristiano Jr, Mateo and Eva. According to a video on Ronaldo’s social media a couple of weeks before the birth, naming her was a democratic process: each parent chose one name. It’s lucky they go together so well!

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By Kara Blakley

Few eras can claim the kind of mystique that the 1960s have. Flower power, social change, and good music are just a few things that immediately come to mind. 1967 saw the Summer of Love, a reaction against an unpopular war and a celebration of counterculture values. Since the 1967 was 50 years ago, this list contains 25 boy names and name ideas from that time., with 25 girls’ names to follow.

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Good, good word names…..

bad baby names

My son once had a classmate with a word name that might have been very pretty except…..it had a terrible meaning.

The poor child’s name was Cliche. That’s right, as in overused and unoriginal. When you just hear the sound — klee-shay — it’s a word that’s undeniably nameworthy. But the meaning knocks it out of contention. Or at least it should.

There’s a fun thread on the forums now of other such words that might make excellent names except for their meanings.

Dementia, for instance, and Maudlin. Alimony and Sushi (not so good as a name, but you can buy the adorable costume on Etsy.)

What would you add to the list? Post your coolest, funniest ideas here and/or there?

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By Katinka

Children’s literature is one of my favourite sources for name inspiration, and it’s a growing trend amongst new parents too. Arthur and Arrietty, Luna and Lyra, Posy and Primrose… all are on the rise in the UK and beginning to be heard in the US, as parents turn to beloved childhood books for names that feel fresh and fun, but also cozily familiar.

The greatest writers of fiction are also truly great namers — it’s part of the magic of successful storytelling. The right name choices cast an aura of authenticity over the whole production; get it wrong, and the spell is quickly broken. So it should come as no surprise that many of our best-loved children’s authors gave their real-life offspring names as distinctive and meaningful as their fictional creations.

Let’s take a look at five of my favourite literary families:

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