By Linda Rosenkrantz

We’ve just celebrated the Summer Solstice, the longest day of the year, signaling the start of summer, with its more leisurely rhythm of sun, surf and sandy beaches. Are you expecting a summertime daughter and still seeking her name? Maybe one that reflects the season of her birth, but doesn’t shout it out?  Here we’ve compiled a list of over two dozen more subtle choices, potential baby names that you may not have considered.

AINEPronounced AWN-ya, this is one of the most popular girls’ names in Ireland and comes onto this list via its role as an early Celtic goddess of summer—as well as queen of the fairies. And if we can learn to pronounce Saoirse, Aine should be a piece of Irish potato cake. It’s in the Top 100 in Ireland and the Top 1000 on Nameberry.

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By Clare Green

This week’s news includes a sibset named after superheroes, a dose of namer’s remorse, and starbaby names from all over the globe.

First of all, happy summer solstice (in the northern hemisphere)! 

Superhero siblings

Would you use a comic book name? One mother blithely agreed with her husband when they were 18 that they could name their first son Kalel (as in Superman), not imagining he’d still think it was a good idea years later.

He also managed to get comic book connections into their other five children’s names: Chloe (named after a friend of Superman’s), Catelin (for reporter Cat Grant), Kara (Supergirl), Connor (Superboy) and Quinn (switching comics to Harley Quinn).

What’s great about these sibling names is that they’re pretty regular (Kalel excepted) – you’d have to have comic book characters on the brain to spot the references – and that they sound alliterative but don’t all start with the same letter, so they don’t feel forced.

Their mom says used to feel embarrassed by the superhero connection, but she’s come around to them – especially as the children are all proud of their supernames.

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a Name Sage post by: Abby View all Name Sage posts

They’d love to honor grandma Jacqueline … but a cousin has already used their first choice! Time to ask the Name Sage for some fresh alternatives.

Sandra writes:

My husband and I are expecting our first child and we just found out it’s a boy!

Baby is due September 28th so I’m just starting to seriously consider names. We know for sure that we would like to name him after my husband’s mother who passed away four years ago. Her name was Jacqueline.

We love Jackson but my cousin already used that name for her son. Jonathon (nickname Jack) was vetoed and just Jack doesn’t feel quite finished to us. Jackie and Clair (after her middle name) are too feminine for my husband’s preference.

We’re open to creative ways to honor my mother-in-law to sidestep the name stealing possibility, but it seems like options are limited. The guilt I’m feeling from both sides is making this challenging, too.

I’d appreciate any advice you may have, or creative name suggestions that we may have bypassed! I just read the article on “9 creative ways to honor loved ones with your child’s name” which has me seeking alternative solutions, too.

The Name Sage replies:

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By Gay Cioffi @  Little Folks Big Questions

How do you tell your only child that you’re expecting a baby?

Before answering this question, I always begin by asking a parent to imagine what it would be like if their spouse or partner made an announcement one day, out of the blue, that went something like this:

“I have exciting news. You are a wonderful spouse, and I love you very much. But, I have decided for our family that it would be incredible if we got another spouse to live with us and join our family, it is going to be so great. And, you will be the special “first” spouse who gets to teach this new spouse everything you know. You are going to love it!”

Most of us would say, “really… seriously?”

This is basically how the idea of a new baby can come across to an only child. Of course, this news should be shared joyfully; however, I am suggesting that parents be mindful of the magnitude of the changes it will bring to the family dynamic and the questions it may raise for the firstborn.

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By  Mélissa Delahaye of Jolis Prénoms

With French baby names, two clear trends have emerged in baby naming: short, simple, two-syllable names and the return to vintage/ancient names. With a heavy preponderance of girl names ending with -a and the growing success of biblical names, there are many overlaps with U.S. trends. French parents are also largely returning to tradition when it comes to naming their children, and old-fashioned names are making their comeback. Name popularity goes in cycles and a growing number of French parents are exploring the branches of their family trees to find inspiration.

Here is a selection of classic names that are either on the rise or already big hits in France, but not as well used in the US:

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