Joss Whedon Inspired Names

Names used in/related to Tv shows created by Joss Whedon
  1. Adam
    • Origin:

      Hebrew
    • Meaning:

      "son of the red earth"
    • Description:

      Adam -- a primal Old Testament name -- was revived as a 1960s cowboy name. Adam is not as popular as it once was and feels ready for a respite, replaced by newer A names like Aidan/Aiden, Avery and Axel. Its most prominent current bearers include Adams Sandler, Levine, Brody and Driver -- who plays a character named Adam on Girls.
  2. Adele
    • Origin:

      French diminutive of Adelaide
    • Meaning:

      "noble, nobility"
    • Description:

      Credit the award-winning single-named British singer for taking the girls’ name Adele from a quiet semi-retirement back into currency. Adele reentered the US Top 1000 popular baby names in 2011 and has remained there ever since.
  3. Amy
    • Origin:

      French
    • Meaning:

      "beloved"
    • Description:

      Amy is the English variation of the Old French name Amée—Aimée in modern French. Amée was a translation of the Latin name Amata, which derived from amatus, meaning "beloved." Other spelling variations include Amie and Ami.
  4. Andrew
    • Origin:

      Greek
    • Meaning:

      "strong and manly"
    • Description:

      During its Top 10 heyday in the late 90s and early oughts, Andrew was one of the "cooler" classic boy names, an update on the old guard Roberts and Richards.
  5. Angel
    • Origin:

      Spanish and English
    • Meaning:

      "angel, messenger"
    • Description:

      As a boys' name, Angel has two distinct name personalities. One is as a perennial favorite Hispanic boys’ name, popular in the US along with Spain, Mexico, and South America.
  6. Anne
    • Origin:

      French variation of English Ann and Hebrew Hannah
    • Meaning:

      "grace"
    • Description:

      The name of the sainted mother of the Virgin Mary was among the top girls’ names for centuries, in both the original English Ann spelling and the French Anne. Both left the Top 100 around 1970 but Anne is still among the most classic names for girls, although others are more likely to choose the original Hannah, the Anna variation, or even Annabel or Annabella.
  7. Anya
    • Origin:

      Russian diminutive of Anna
    • Meaning:

      "grace"
    • Description:

      Anya is a Russian variation of Anna, which came from the Hebrew name Hannah. Anya is the form found most frequently in Russia, Poland, and other East European countries, while Anja is the spelling usually preferred in Germany Norway, Denmark, Germany, Sweden, and The Netherlands. In the Hungarian language, Anya also means mother.
  8. Alpha
    • Boyd
      • Origin:

        Scottish
      • Meaning:

        "blond"
      • Description:

        Has a bit of a hayseed image, and that oy sound is tough to work with.
    • Buffy
      • Origin:

        Diminutive of Elizabeth
      • Description:

        Buffy was a one-time sorority girl with a roommate named Muffy, then a fearless vampire slayer, though still basically fluffy. You might think of Buffy as the feminine version of Chip or Bud -- an all-purpose nickname now buried in a mid-century time capsule.
    • Caleb
      • Origin:

        Hebrew
      • Meaning:

        "dog; whole heart"
      • Description:

        Caleb is an attractive Old Testament name that has been in the US Top 100 for nearly three decades now. Consistently popular but never too popular, Caleb feels more like a classic than a momentary trend.
    • Captain
      • Caroline
        • Origin:

          French, feminine variation of Charles
        • Meaning:

          "free man"
        • Description:

          Caroline is a perennial classic, one of the elite group of girls' names that's ALWAYS ranked among the Top 1000 and that's been in the Top 100 since 1994. Elegant yet strong, Caroline calls to mind the Kennedy Camelot years and Princess Caroline of Monaco.
      • Charles
        • Origin:

          French from German
        • Meaning:

          "free man"
        • Description:

          Charles derives from the Germanic name Karl, meaning "man" or "free man", and is a royal name in multiple European countries. A famous early bearer is Charlemagne, King of the Franks and Lombards and then Roman Emperor in the 8th-9th centuries.
      • Claire
        • Origin:

          French form of Clara
        • Meaning:

          "bright, clear"
        • Description:

          Claire, luminous, simple, and strong, is one of those special names that is familiar yet distinctive, feminine but not frilly, combining historical depth with a modern edge. And though Claire is enjoying revived popularity, it will never be seen as trendy. Claire is also a great middle name choice.
      • Clem
        • Origin:

          , English, diminutive of Clement
        • Description:

          Laid-back and humble, with a distinctive down-home charm.
      • Connor
        • Origin:

          Irish
        • Meaning:

          "lover of hounds"
        • Description:

          Connor, the appealing name of an early semi-legendary king of Ulster in Irish mythology, sits firmly in the Top 100 and taken together with its alternate spellings would rank even higher. In its native Ireland the Conor version is one of the highest charting boys’ name.
      • Cordelia
        • Origin:

          Latin; Celtic
        • Meaning:

          "heart; daughter of the sea"
        • Description:

          Cordelia is exactly the kind of old-fashioned, grown-up name for girls that many parents are seeking for their daughters today. The name of King Lear's one sympathetic daughter, Cordelia has both style and substance along with its Shakespearean pedigree.
      • Darla
        • Origin:

          English
        • Meaning:

          "darling"
        • Description:

          Dimpled Our Gang comedy name.
      • Dawn
        • Origin:

          English
        • Meaning:

          "dawn, sunrise"
        • Description:

          Dawn's heyday in the US, Canada and the UK came in the 1960s and 70s. It peaked at #14 in the US in 1971, but has since sunk from sight to be eclipsed by other names with the same meaning, such as Aurora, Roxana or Zariah.