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THE FOUR-GENERATION RULE

THE FOUR-GENERATION RULE

It takes at least four generations for names to sound appealing again for babies. The names of today’s moms and dads – names popular from the late sixties through the eighties – are for the most part too familiar to foist upon an innocent newborn.  You’ll find a lot of young parents but not many stylish babies with the following 1970s-style names:

girls

AMYDANIELLEERICAERINHEATHERJENNIFERJESSICAJULIEKARENKATIEKELLYKIMKRISTINLAURENLINDSAYLORIMEGANMELISSAMICHELLESTEPHANIETRACY

Boys are a little more complicated, as styles don’t change as fast and more boys are named after their dads.  Still, these are found far less frequently now than in the 1970s.

BRADLEYBRIANCRAIGDARRENDENNISDEREKDOUGLASERICGLENNJEFFREYKEITHKENKEVINSCOTTSTEVENTODD

Even less attractive are the Baby Boomer Names, dowdy and old-fashioned.  Out out out are:

girls

BARBARABEVERLYBRENDACAROLCONNIEDEBRADENISEDIANEDONNAGAILJOYCEJUDYLYNNMARILYNPATRICIASANDRASHARONSHEILASHERRY

boys

ALANBRUCEDONALDGARYGERALDJERRYLAWRENCE or LARRYLEONARDRICHARDROGERRONALDWAYNE

It’s not until you go back four generations, to names popular around the 1920s, that you start to find some appeal.  Names from that decade that are beginning to find a new audience among modern baby namers, for stylish newborns, are:

girls

ALICEANNACLARAEDITHELEANORELLAEVAEVELYNFLORENCEFRANCESGRACEHAZELIDAJOSEPHINEJUNELILLIANLOUISELUCYMARGARETPEARLROSERUBYVERAVIOLET

boys

EDWARDRAYMONDWALTERJACKHENRYARTHURLOUISFREDJOESAMUELLEORAYTHEODORECHESTER

About the Author

Pamela Redmond

Pamela Redmond is the cocreator and CEO of Nameberry. and Baby Name DNA. The coauthor of ten bestselling baby name books, Redmond is an internationally-recognized name expert, quoted and published widely in such media outlets as the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, The Today Show,, CNN, and the BBC. Redmond is also a New York Times bestselling novelist whose books include Younger, the basis for the hit television show, and its new sequel, Older.