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Spanish Names

Spanish Names

Spanish names have become widely popular in the US. Along with the highly-ranked Isabella, Spanish names in the US Top 300 for girls include Ana, Angelina, Elena, Gabriela, Jada, Liliana, Maya, Savannah, and Sofia.

Spanish names for boys ranking among the US Top 100 are Mateo, Angel, Jose, and Santiago, with Spanish boy names Leonardo, Diego, Luis, Antonio, Miguel, Gael, Alejandro, and Lorenzo also popular.

Along with top name Lucia, popular Spanish girl names in Spain and throughout Latin America include Maria, Martina, and Paula. Baby boy names popular in Spain and Latin America include Hugo, Pablo, Alvaro, Mario, Manuel, and Javier.

Unique Spanish names attracting attention in Spain and Latin America include Alba, Carmen, Laia, and Triana for girls, along with Dario, Thiago, Gonzalo, and Izan for boys.

If you're searching for Spanish names for your child, here's our full range of Spanish names for baby boys and baby girls. You might also want to consult our individual lists of Spanish Names for Girls and Spanish Names for Boys, along with the list of Popular Names in Spain.

You can also browse our full roster of Name Origins or see Popular Names by country.

  1. ArloHeart
    • Origin:

      Irish or English
    • Meaning:

      "between two hills"
    • Description:

      Arlo has many possible derivations along with its Irish and English roots. It may be a shortened form of the Italian name Carlo or the Spanish Carlos, and in Basque-speaking regions it is the word for area. In English, Arlo was used as a place name, Arlo Hill, by Edmund Spenser in his epic poem The Faerie Queene and is thought to derive from the Celtic word Aherlow, meaning “between two highlands.”
  2. IslaHeart
    • Origin:

      Scottish place-name or Spanish
    • Meaning:

      "island"
    • Description:

      Isla, the Spanish word for island, is also the name of a Scottish river, an island (spelled Islay), and the red-haired actress Isla Fisher, married to Sacha Baron Cohen. A top girls' name in the US, Isla is also popular overseas, especially in England, Wales, and her native Scotland.
  3. HugoHeart
    • Origin:

      Latinized form of Hugh
    • Meaning:

      "mind, intellect"
    • Description:

      Hugo, the Latin form of Hugh, has more heft and energy than the original -- and of course we love names that end (or begin, for that matter) with an o. This one is especially appealing because it's backed up by lots of solid history and European style.
  4. ElenaHeart
    • Origin:

      Spanish, Italian, German, Greek variation of Helen
    • Meaning:

      "bright, shining light"
    • Description:

      Elena, a pan-European version of Helen, has roots in Spanish, Italian, Slavic, and Romanian, among others. Helen, the name from which it derives, came from the Greek word helene, meaning "torch." Alternate spellings include Elaina, Ellena, and Alena.
  5. MayaHeart
    • Origin:

      Greek mythology name; Central American Indian empire name; Latinate variation of May; Spanish, diminutive of Amalia; variation of Maia; Hebrew
    • Meaning:

      "water"
    • Description:

      In addition to being the name of a Central American culture, Maya was the legendary Greek mother of Hermes by Zeus, and means "illusion" in Sanskrit and Eastern Pantheism. It can also be spelled Maia, though both names have so many possible origins and meanings that not all of them are related. To the Romans, Maia/Maya was the incarnation of the earth mother and goddess of spring, after whom they named the month of May.
  6. LolaHeart
    • Origin:

      Spanish, diminutive of Dolores
    • Meaning:

      "lady of sorrows"
    • Description:

      A hot starbaby name – chosen by Kelly Ripa, Chris Rock, Lisa Bonet, Denise Richards and Charlie Sheen, Carnie Wilson, and Annie Lennox, and used as the nickname of Madonna's Lourdes – Lola manages to feel fun and sassy without going over the top. Be warned, though: "Whatever Lola wants, Lola gets," to quote a song from the show Damn Yankees.
  7. EmiliaHeart
    • Origin:

      Feminine variation of Emil, Latin
    • Meaning:

      "rival"
    • Description:

      Emilia is the feminine form of the Roman clan name Aemilius, which derived from the Latin aemulus, meaning "rival." In Shakespeare’s Othello, Emilia is the wife of Iago and confidante of Desdemona. Amelia, although homonymous, has a different root and meaning.
  8. LuciaHeart
    • Origin:

      Italian, feminine variation of Lucius, Latin
    • Meaning:

      "light"
    • Description:

      Lucia is derived from lux, the Latin word for light. It is considered to be the feminine form of Lucius as well as the Latinate spelling of Lucy. Due to its connection to light, Lucia was traditionally given to babies born as daylight was breaking.
  9. IsabellaHeart
    • Origin:

      Spanish and Italian variation of Elizabeth, Hebrew
    • Meaning:

      "pledged to God"
    • Description:

      Isabella is the Latinate form of Isabel, a variation of Elizabeth which originally derived from the Hebrew name Elisheba. Variations Isabelle and Isabel are also popular, with the Scottish spelling Isobel another possibility. Newer alternatives include Sabella and Isabetta.
  10. MateoHeart
    • Origin:

      Spanish
    • Meaning:

      "gift of God"
    • Description:

      Mateo is a Latinate form of Matthew, which derived from the Hebrew name Mattiyahu, consisting of the elements mattan, meaning "gift" and yah, which references the Hebrew God. Mateo can also be spelled Matteo, which is the Italian variation. Matheo is an archaic Spanish spelling, although it is used in France as Mathéo.
  11. IsabelHeart
    • Origin:

      Spanish variation of Elizabeth
    • Meaning:

      "pledged to God"
    • Description:

      Isabel derived from Elizabeth in southwest Europe during the Middle Ages. It was originally written as Elisabel, but the first syllable was dropped as it spread across the continent. In Spain and Portugal, Isabel and Elizabeth are considered to be variations of the same name, but they are treated as separate names in other European countries and the US.
  12. DiegoHeart
    • Origin:

      Spanish variation of James
    • Meaning:

      "supplanter"
    • Description:

      The energetic Diego is rising rapidly along with a lot of other authentically Spanish baby names that work perfectly well with surnames of any origin.
  13. JadeHeart
    • Origin:

      Spanish
    • Meaning:

      "stone of the side"
    • Description:

      As cool as the precious green stone said to transmit wisdom, clarity, justice, courage, and modesty, Jade has been rising in popularity since Mick and Bianca Jagger chose it for their daughter in 1971. Jade is one of the top names in France. Superchef Giada de Laurentiis chose it as the English translation of her own first name. Jade manages to strike the golden mean as one of the familiar-yet-unusual girl names starting with J.
  14. MarcoHeart
    • Origin:

      Italian and Spanish form of Mark
    • Meaning:

      "warlike"
    • Description:

      Simple and universal, Marco is a Latin classic that would make a much livelier namesake for an Uncle Mark. It was used for her son by actress Jill Hennessy and goes well with surnames of any nationality.
  15. LiviaHeart
    • Origin:

      Diminutive of Olivia or Latin
    • Meaning:

      "blue, envious"
    • Description:

      Though it sounds like a chopped-off variation of Olivia, which means olive, the distinctively attractive Livia has been an independent name since the days of the ancient Romans, when it belonged to Livia Drusilla—the powerful wife of the Emperor Augustus—and is still commonly heard in modern Italy.
  16. RafaelHeart
    • Origin:

      Spanish variation of Raphael
    • Meaning:

      "God has healed"
    • Description:

      Rafael is perhaps the ultimate romantic Latino name, not a bad gift to give your son. The Raphael spelling is the original Hebrew version.
  17. LilianaHeart
    • Origin:

      Italian and Spanish variations of Lilian
    • Meaning:

      "lily, a flower"
    • Description:

      This melodious and feminine Latin variation of the Lily family is a favorite in the Hispanic community and would work beautifully with an Anglo surname as well. It's among the Spanish and Italian names for girls that make smooth transitions to the English-speaking world. The late Sopranos star James Gandolfini has a daughter named Liliana Ruth.
  18. RamonaHeart
    • Origin:

      Spanish, feminine variation of Ramon
    • Meaning:

      "wise protector"
    • Description:

      Ramona is a sweet spot name – neither too trendy nor too eccentric. Kids will associate it with the clever Ramona Quimby character in the series of books by Beverly Cleary, also seen on TV. It was chosen by starcouple Maggie Gyllenhaal and Peter Sarsgaard for their little girl, who would be joined by sister Gloria.
  19. EsmeraldaHeart
    • Origin:

      Spanish and Portuguese
    • Meaning:

      "emerald"
    • Description:

      Esmeralda came into use as an applied use of the Spanish word for emerald, esmeralda. In the 1831 Victor Hugo novel Notre-Dame de Paris, also known as The Hunchback of Notre-Dame, the heroine was born Agnes, but called La Esmeralda in reference to the jewel she wears around her neck. The name Esmeralda got increased visibility via the Disney version of the story.
  20. SavannahHeart
    • Origin:

      Spanish
    • Meaning:

      "flat tropical grassland"
    • Description:

      A place name with a deep Southern accent, the once-obscure Savannah shot to fame, with others of its genre, on the heels of the best seller Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, which was set in the mossy Georgia city of Savannah. Originally a substitute for the overused Samantha, Savannah is now becoming overused itself, long among the top girls' names starting with S.