Scottish names for girls

  1. Adaira
    • Ailsa
      • Origin:

        Scottish from Norse
      • Meaning:

        "elf victory"
      • Description:

        Ailsa is a traditional Scottish name for girls related to a rocky island in the Firth of Clyde called Ailsa Craig. It might make an interesting alternative to the outdated Ashley or overly popular Ella, and could also be thought of as a relative of Elizabeth or Elsa.
    • Aila
      • Aileana
        • Athdara
          • Bonnie
            • Origin:

              Scottish
            • Meaning:

              "beautiful, cheerful"
            • Description:

              Bonnie is an adorable nickname name, heading back up the popularity list after a 50-year nap. A Top 100 girls' name throughout the rest of the English-speaking world, Americans are later to jump on the Bonnie bandwagon but now it's trending here too.
          • Cora
            • Origin:

              Greek
            • Meaning:

              "maiden"
            • Description:

              Cora is a lovely, old-fashioned girls' that has been recently rejuvenated by its contemporary-feeling simplicity. In fact, Cora seemed headed straight for the top of the popularity list when the coronavirus pandemic somewhat weakened its appeal.
          • Effie
            • Origin:

              English diminutive of Euphemia, Greek
            • Meaning:

              "pleasant speech"
            • Description:

              Effie is the old-fashioned short form for Euphemia. It shares a vintage charm with Hattie and Letty although is much rarer than either. Effie is a character in The Hunger Games and Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants.
          • Elsie
            • Origin:

              Diminutive of Elizabeth via its Scottish variation, Elspeth
            • Meaning:

              "pledged to God"
            • Description:

              Elsie is a sweet vintage nickname-name turned modern star. After a 30-year hiatus, Elsie started climbing the US popularity list 20 years ago and is still headed for the top.
          • Finola
            • Origin:

              Irish
            • Meaning:

              "white shoulders"
            • Description:

              Finola, the readily accessible version of some of the more problematic Gaelic versions of the name, would make a welcome addition to the stockpot of Irish girls' names.
          • Fiona
            • Origin:

              Scottish
            • Meaning:

              "white, fair"
            • Description:

              Fiona entered the American consciousness with the opening of the 1954 Broadway musical Brigadoon, but didn't come onto the U.S. popularity list until 1990.
          • Flora
            • Origin:

              Latin
            • Meaning:

              "flower"
            • Description:

              Flora, the name of the Roman goddess of flowers and spring, who enjoyed eternal youth, is one of the gently old-fashioned girls' flower names we think is due for a comeback— alongside cousins Cora and Dora. Florence, Fiorella, Fleur, and Flower are translations, but we like Flora best of all.
          • Isla
            • Origin:

              Scottish place-name or Spanish
            • Meaning:

              "island"
            • Description:

              Isla is a hit name throughout the English-speaking world but hasn't found the same popularity in other western countries, perhaps because its spelling and pronunciation don't make sense for those whose native language is not English. Think island without the final two letters.
          • Isobel
            • Origin:

              Scottish variation of Isabel
            • Meaning:

              "pledged to God"
            • Description:

              The Scottish spelling of Isabel has a definite character of her own, the 'o' giving her an extra infusion of strength but also an element of confusion. How do you pronounce that? Answer: Exactly like Isabel or Isabelle.
          • Lileas
            • Origin:

              Scottish variation of Lily
            • Description:

              Adds some thorns to the smooth texture of Lily.
          • Lilias
            • Origin:

              Latin
            • Meaning:

              "lily"
            • Description:

              An unusual flower name deriving from the Latin word for lily (lilium), this variant has always been popular in Scotland.
          • Maggie
            • Origin:

              Diminutive of Margaret
            • Meaning:

              "pearl"
            • Description:

              Maggie is a cute, earthy short form that has been in style for several decades now, still sometimes used as an independent name by such parents as Jon Stewart. First used in Scotland, it got a large bump in popularity via the 1971 Rod Stewart hit song "Maggie May." Today's Maggie might just as well be short for a more adventurous name such as Magdalena or Magnolia as for the classic Margaret.

              Maggie Gyllenhaal was born Margaret.

          • Margery
            • Origin:

              Medieval variation of Margaret
            • Meaning:

              "pearl"
            • Description:

              An old royal name in England and Scotland that's also spelled Marjorie. Popular in the Middle Ages and Tudor period, it was revived at the end of the 19th century, peaked in 1921 and dropped off the list in 1958, enough time to be reconsidered as a Margaret alternative. The name Margery Daw is familiar via the seesaw nursery rhyme and Margery Williams wrote the children's classic The Velveteen Rabbit..
          • Mina
            • Origin:

              Hindu equivalent of Pisces or diminutive of Wilhelmina, German
            • Meaning:

              "resolute protection"
            • Description:

              Most famous as a Dracula victim (where Mina is short for Wilhelmina), Mina is a name that can stand on its own or be a diminutive of any name ending in -mina, most usually Wilhelmina.
          • Moira
            • Origin:

              Irish, variation of Mary
            • Meaning:

              "bitter; beloved; drop of the sea"
            • Description:

              Well-established Irish and Scottish name that has never really caught on across the pond. Remembered by an older generation as the beautiful red-haired ballerina in the film The Red Shoes, Moira Shearer.