Name List

  1. Adriel
    • Origin:

      Hebrew
    • Meaning:

      "God is my master"
    • Description:

      This biblical name is getting wider notice. While Adrian has had its time in the limelight since the late 70s, parents are beginning to look for fresher alternatives. In the Bible, Adriel was the husband of Merab, a daughter of King Saul. Adriel, like other names ending in -el like Gabriel, Raphael, and Uriel, is also the name of an angel. The angel Adriel is known as the Angel of Death. Adriel entered the charts in 2002, and has risen now into the Top 200.
  2. Aislinn
    • Origin:

      Irish
    • Meaning:

      "dream"
    • Description:

      Old Irish name that's taken off in its Anglicized forms, mainly Ashlyn or Ashlynn. Nonetheless, this more traditional version debuted in the US Top 1000 in 2015.
  3. ALABASTER
    • Alice
      • Origin:

        German
      • Meaning:

        "noble"
      • Description:

        Alice is a classic literary name that's both strong and sweet, ranking in the US Top 100 and popular throughout the western world. Alice is derived from the Old French name Aalis, a diminutive of Adelais that itself came from the Germanic name Adalhaidis, which is composed of the Proto-Germanic elements aþala, meaning "noble," and haidu, "kind, appearance, type."
    • Alistair
      • Origin:

        English spelling of Alasdair, Scottish version of Alexander
      • Meaning:

        "defending men"
      • Description:

        With many British names invading the Yankee name pool, the sophisticated Alistair could and should be part of the next wave. It debuted in the US Top 1000 in 2016. You have a triple choice with this name--the British spell it Alistair or Alastair, while the Scots prefer Alasdair--but they're all suave Gaelic versions of Alexander. Adopted by the lowland Scots by the seventeenth century, the name didn't become popular outside Scotland and Ireland until the twentieth century.
    • Ama
      • Origin:

        Ewe, Akan, Ghanaian, Cherokee
      • Meaning:

        "born on Saturday; water"
      • Description:

        Ama is a day name used by the Akan people of Ghana for girls born on Saturday. Names that reference a baby's birth by day of the week, time of day, or season of the year are common in many African cultures. Ama is one that can be used happily by parents who live in English-speaking countries.
    • Anthea
      • Origin:

        Greek
      • Meaning:

        "flowery"
      • Description:

        This unjustly neglected floral name has a BBC accent and a Greek mythological heritage: Anthea is an epithet of Hera, the Greek queen of the gods, and her name has been used as poetic symbol of spring.
    • Anwen
      • Origin:

        Welsh
      • Meaning:

        "very fair, beautiful"
      • Description:

        Anwen is one of the simplest and best of the classic Welsh girls' names, more unusual than Bronwen but with the same serene feel.
    • Asha
      • Origin:

        Sanskrit; Swahili
      • Meaning:

        "hope; life"
      • Description:

        Asha is an Indian name that comes from the Sanskrit word for hope or desire, but it is also a Swahili name derived from Aisha, meaning life. Since the ascendance of Ashley through the 1980s and 90s, all baby names Ash-related have been used in the U.S. for both girls and boys, from Ashlyn to Ashby, Ashton to Asher. Despite its separate roots, Asha is part of this group.
    • Atara
      • Origin:

        Hebrew
      • Meaning:

        "crown"
      • Description:

        Finally, an attractive, undiscovered Old Testament choice for girls.
    • Atlee
      • Avalon
        • Origin:

          Celtic
        • Meaning:

          "island of apples"
        • Description:

          Avalon, an island paradise of Celtic myth and Arthurian legend--it was where King Arthur was taken to recover from his wounds-- and also the colorful capital of the California island of Catalina-- makes a heavenly first name. Actress Rena Sofer and British musician Julian Cope used it for their daughters.
      • Azrael
        • Origin:

          Hebrew, variation of Azriel
        • Meaning:

          "help of God"
        • Description:

          This is the name of Angel of Death in Jewish and Muslim tradition, not a great start for an innocent child -- or a great role model for a teenager.
      • Bishop
        • Origin:

          English occupational name
        • Description:

          Reese Witherspoon's Deacon has opened this churchy direction for occupational names. It reentered the US Top 1000 in 2015.
      • Bram
        • Origin:

          Dutch variation of Abraham
        • Meaning:

          "father of multitudes"
        • Description:

          Bram has an unusual measure of character and charm for a one-syllable name; it started as a hipper-than-Abe diminutive of the biblical Abraham, but is also an independent Irish and Dutch name, made famous by Irish-born Dracula creator Bram (nee Abraham) Stoker. Bram is currently Number 16 in the Netherlands; Bram Howard was a character on The West Wing.
      • Bramwell
        • Origin:

          English
        • Meaning:

          "well where the gorse grows"
        • Description:

          The only boy in the Brontë family; the name has a lonely Wuthering Heights/Jane Eyre feel.
      • Branwen
        • Origin:

          Celtic
        • Meaning:

          "blessed raven"
        • Description:

          This is an attractive Celtic mythological name, popular in Wales and a cousin of the better known Bronwyn. In Welsh mythology, Branwen was turned into a bird.
      • Briar
        • Origin:

          English
        • Meaning:

          "a thorny patch"
        • Description:

          Fairy-tale memories of Sleeping Beauty inspire some parents—such as Rachel Bilson and Hayden Christensen—to call their daughters Briar Rose. But Briar plus a different middle name might work even better. It's one of the newly popular nature-word names, charting in the US for the first time in 2015 for both genders.
      • BRYNN
        • Caius
          • Origin:

            Latin
          • Meaning:

            "rejoice"
          • Description:

            Caius is classical and serious but also has a simple, joyful quality. There was a third century pope named Caius, as well as an early Christian writer, several Shakespearean characters, and a Twilight vampire. We would pronounce the name to rhyme with eye-us though at Cambridge University in England, where it's the name of a college, it's pronounced keys.