Romantic Italian and Italian inspired Girl names

  1. Abriana
    • Origin:

      Italian feminine variation of Abraham
    • Meaning:

      "father of multitudes"
    • Description:

      This lovely name is all but unknown outside Italy but fits perfectly in with the fashions for vowel-starting names that are elaborately feminine. Might make a distinctive alternative to Angelina or Arianna. Downside: People will inevitably mistake it for Adriana.
  2. Adelina
    • Origin:

      Italian, Spanish, Portuguese and Slavic variation of Adeline
    • Meaning:

      "noble, nobility"
    • Description:

      Adelina is back in the Top 1000 after an absence of nearly a century, thanks to the meteoric rise of her sister name Adeline -- along with Adelaide, Adele, and Ada. Some parents choose Adelina because they want to get to cute vintage nickname Addie, but others favor it as a slightly more unusual form of this sweet vintage girls' name. A lot of attention was focused on it recently via the women's figure skating gold medal winner at the Sochi winter olympics--Adelina Sotnikova.

      While Adeline is usually pronounced in the U.S. with a long i in the last syllable, to rhyme with mine, Adelina is pronounced with the long e sound at the end, as in 'lee-na'.

  3. Alessia
    • Origin:

      Italian variation of Alexis
    • Meaning:

      "defending warrior"
    • Description:

      Young Canadian pop singer Alessia Cara has given this spicy-sounding name a new lease on life, propelling it into the Top 1000 in 2016. (It was one of the year's fastest-rising girls' names.) The main risk is that it feels so close to Alexa, Alicia, Alexis and Alyssa-- all becoming overused -- that it could be mistaken for one of those more familiar names.
  4. Amalia
    • Origin:

      German
    • Meaning:

      "work"
    • Description:

      Amalia is a widely cross-cultural name, heard from Italy to Romania, Germany to Scandinavia. The current heir to the Dutch throne is Princess Catharina-Amalia of Orange. It can be pronounced ah-MAH-lee-a or ah-mah-LEE-a.
  5. Amara
    • Origin:

      Igbo, Sanskrit, Arabic
    • Meaning:

      "grace, immortal, tribe"
    • Description:

      Strong, attractive, and stylish, Amara is a true multicultural choice enjoying some popularity in both the US and the UK. In the US Top 1000 since the turn of this century, Amara has been holding steady in the rankings between overly popular and obscure.
  6. Angela
    • Origin:

      Latin
    • Meaning:

      "angel"
    • Description:

      Angela was a Top 10 name from 1965 to 1979, the fifth most popular name for three years, and staying in the double digits until the turn of the 21st century. Today, though, Angelina or Angelica would be more fashionable options.
  7. Angelina
    • Origin:

      Greek, Italian, Spanish, Russian diminutive of Angela
    • Meaning:

      "angel"
    • Description:

      The gorgeous Angelina Jolie has promoted the star power of her name and changed Angelina's image from delicate to intense, from older Italian mama to stylish multi-cultural child. Kids might relate to the dancing mouse in the series of charming children's books, Angelina Ballerina, or to the Harry Potter character, Angelina Johnson Weasley, a member of Dumbledore's army.
  8. Aria
    • Origin:

      Italian and Hebrew
    • Meaning:

      "air; song or melody; lion"
    • Description:

      Aria is a multi-cultural name with two extremely popular versions: this more word-like one along with Arya, the spelling used for the feisty young heroine of Game of Thrones. There were about 6400 baby girls named Aria in the US last year alog with 2400 named Arya, which counted together places the name in the Top 10.
  9. Arianna
    • Origin:

      Italian form of Ariadne, Greek
    • Meaning:

      "most holy"
    • Description:

      A smooth, attractive choice, Arianna's on the rise with both single and double 'r's and 'n's. Single 'r' double 'n' Arianna — the second most popular version of the name — is these days associated with Greek-born blog queen Arianna Huffington.
  10. Bianca
    • Origin:

      Italian
    • Meaning:

      "white"
    • Description:

      Bianca, the livelier Italian and Shakespearean version of Blanche, has been chosen by many American parents since the 1990s, just as Blanca is a favorite in the Spanish-speaking community. Its meaning of white relates to snow, making it one of the prime names for winter babies.
  11. Bria
    • Origin:

      Diminutive of Briana or Gabriella
    • Description:

      Sweet and sparky but maybe a little bit stuck in the 90s, Bria is a nickname-y style choice with various origins.
  12. Carina
    • Origin:

      Italian
    • Meaning:

      "dear little one"
    • Description:

      Carina is a pretty delicately feminine name whose fall from popularity is not helped by its similarity to hurricane name Katrina or slang victim Karen.
  13. Carlotta
    • Origin:

      Italian variation of Charlotte, French diminutive of Charles
    • Meaning:

      "free man"
    • Description:

      Carlotta has a large measure of finger-snapping charm and substance — despite being a not too pleasant character in The Little Mermaid. Carlotta is also the diva/prima donna in The Phantom of the Opera, and there was an Empress Carlotta of Mexico.
  14. Carmela
    • Origin:

      Italian and Spanish variation of Carmel
    • Meaning:

      "garden"
    • Description:

      It will be a long time before Carmela shakes the image of TV's Sopranos wife.
  15. Caterina
    • Origin:

      Italian variation of Katherine
    • Description:

      If your ancestry is Italian, you may want to consider this elegant twist on a classic.
  16. Claretta
    • Clarina
      • Daniella
        • Origin:

          Italian, Polish, Czech, feminine variation of Daniel
        • Description:

          Daniella, Daniela, and Danielle were among the hottest names for twenty years, but now, though still popular, they can no longer be considered stylish options, lagging behind the newer Ella, Stella, Bella, Gabriella, and Isabella.
      • Eleonara
        • Origin:

          Italian, German, Dutch, and Polish version of Eleanor
        • Meaning:

          "bright, shining one"
        • Description:

          The usual form of Eleonara is Eleanora, with each syllable pronounced, but transposing, adding, or subtracting a vowel or syllable here or there works fine and adds to the international, feminine spin on a solid name.
      • Elisa
        • Origin:

          Spanish and Italian, diminutive of Elizabeth
        • Description:

          Elisa may be one of the most appealing of this contingent of names, but the Elizabeth variations that start with A are heading up, the E versions down. Eliza is much more stylish these days than Elisa.