Occupational Names

  1. Taylor
    • Origin:

      English occupational name
    • Meaning:

      "tailor"
    • Description:

      Taylor is one of the prime unisex surnames used for girls and has also been a soap opera favorite. Taylor was in the Top 10 for the last several years of the twentieth century, so that now it tends to feel a little nineties – though Taylor Swift is keeping it in the spotlight and Tay is a charming nickname. Garth Brooks and Bryan Cranston have daughters named Taylor; Taylor Schilling portrays lead Piper Chapman in Orange is the New Black.
  2. Cohen
    • Origin:

      Hebrew
    • Meaning:

      "priest"
    • Description:

      Cohen is a common last name among Jews and an important spiritual name in the Jewish religion, associated with the hereditary priests who claimed descent from the biblical Aaron. As a result of its religious significance, Cohen is considered by some to be inappropriate to use as a first name, particularly by people with no Jewish heritage.
  3. Miller
    • Origin:

      English occupational name
    • Meaning:

      "grinder of grain"
    • Description:

      Miller is an up-and-coming choice in the stylish occupational genre, chosen by Stella McCartney, Melissa Etheridge, and by Tea Leoni and David Duchovny. Miller is also among the most common last names in the US.
  4. Forest
    • Origin:

      French occupational name
    • Meaning:

      "woodsman or woods"
    • Description:

      The Forest variation of Forrest, used by actor Whitaker, nudges the meaning more toward the woods and away from the woodsman.
  5. Foster
    • Origin:

      English occupational name
    • Meaning:

      "forester"
    • Description:

      Foster is one commonly heard last name that makes a fine first. More unusual than Forrester or Gardener yet eminently first-name-ready, the only problem with Foster might be its association with "foster child."
  6. Wayne
    • Origin:

      English occupational name
    • Meaning:

      "maker of wagons"
    • Description:

      When Marion Michael Morrison became John Wayne around 1930, his last name took on an air of cowboy cool that lasted about thirty years, but by now it's strictly a dad or granddad name.
  7. Devin
    • Origin:

      Irish
    • Meaning:

      "poet"
    • Description:

      Devilishly handsome, Devin arrived as Kevin was moving out. Not to be confused (though it often is) with the English place-name Devon. While both Devin and Devon are flagging somewhat for boys, the names have dropped out of the Top 1000 for girls, making it more a masculine and less a unisex name these days.
  8. Tyler
    • Origin:

      English occupational name
    • Meaning:

      "maker of tiles"
    • Description:

      The presidential Tyler rocketed up popularity charts in the late 1980s and early 1990s (it ranked Number 9 for that entire decade), along with cousin Taylor, becoming almost pandemic across the land-- and to make matters more confusing, both (especially Taylor) have been used for girls as well.
  9. Marshall
    • Origin:

      English
    • Meaning:

      "one who looks after horses"
    • Description:

      Marshall is an occupational surname, not having to do with anything military or martial, but stemming from the Norman French for someone caring for horses. It's been used as a first name since the nineteenth century and has been on the Social Security list since it started to publish its data in 1880.
  10. Thatcher
    • Origin:

      English occupational name
    • Meaning:

      "roof thatcher"
    • Description:

      Thatcher is an open and friendly freckle-faced surname, fresher sounding than Tyler or Taylor, that dates back to the days of thatched-roof cottages. It is catching on with modern parents—it reached the US Top 1000 for the first time in 2013.
  11. Jagger
    • Origin:

      English occupational name
    • Meaning:

      "carter"
    • Description:

      Jagger is a swaggering Rolling Stone of a name that's been picked up by a number of fellow celebs, including Lindsay Davenport and Brett Scallions--while Soleil Moon Frye pulled a gender switch when she bestowed it on her daughter. It's edgy with a touch of danger.
  12. Porter
    • Origin:

      English from French occupational name
    • Meaning:

      "doorkeeper or carrier"
    • Description:

      It may surprise you to know that surname name Porter was fairly popular in the US in the 19th and early 20th centuries, then went underground for 40 years only to reemerge at the turn of this century and climb the ladder again.
  13. Booker
    • Origin:

      English
    • Meaning:

      "scribe"
    • Description:

      Booker would make for a very cool name, for writers, reformers, R & B fans and those wanting to pay tribute to Booker T. Washington.
  14. Kyler
    • Origin:

      Dutch
    • Meaning:

      "bowman, archer"
    • Description:

      A favorite among younger parents, this is one of the names that rose to the surface when Tyler and Kyle started to sink.
  15. Duke
    • Origin:

      English rank of nobility
    • Description:

      While John Wayne and Duke Ellington are worthy role models, the reason Duke is currently enjoying a revival and returned to the Top 1000 in 2013 as one of the year's fastest-rising boys’ names is more likely due to the name given to high-profile TV couple Giuliana and Bill Rancic. Christened Edward Duke, he has always been called by his middle name, just as Edward Duke Ellington was. Duke is just one of several aristocratic titles being increasingly used by ordinary citizens.
  16. Deacon
    • Origin:

      Greek
    • Meaning:

      "messenger, servant"
    • Description:

      This name was transposed from the word for a church officer to a baby name when Reese Witherspoon and Ryan Phillippe chose it for their son, after a baseball player ancestor, and Don Johnson followed suit. Its popularity also got a boost from Nashville character Deacon Claybourne -- only to fall a bit in recent years.
  17. Bailey
    • Origin:

      Occupational name
    • Meaning:

      "law enforcer, bailiff"
    • Description:

      Bailey -- a jaunty surname -- was first used for a female TV character in 1978 in the show WKRP in Cincinnaati, then caught on big time. Bailey's still an appealing choice, though, and a celebrity fave. Parents of daughters named Bailey include Scot Baio and Stella McCartney.
  18. Baker
    • Origin:

      English occupational surname
    • Description:

      One of the most appealing of the newly hip occupational names, evoking sweet smells emanating from the oven. Much fresher sounding than than others that have been around for a while, like Cooper, and Carter.
  19. Tucker
    • Origin:

      English occupational name
    • Meaning:

      "fabric pleater"
    • Description:

      Tucker has more spunk than most last-name-first-names, and also a positive, comforting ("Tuck me in, Mommy") feel.
  20. Todd
    • Origin:

      English
    • Meaning:

      "fox"
    • Description:

      A 1970s beach boy surfing buddy of Scott, Brad, and Chad, Todd is given to relatively few babies these days.