Occupational Names

  1. Weaver
    • Origin:

      Occupational name
    • Description:

      Weaver, which made an appearance as a first name on the U.S. Top 1000 in the late 19th century and then vanished, may rise again along with its occupational brethren, from already-popular choices such as Cooper and Parker to au courant ones like Archer to occupational hotties of the future, including Booker and Sayer.
  2. Barbeau
    • Origin:

      French occupational name
    • Meaning:

      "fisherman"
    • Description:

      How to spruce up Fisher or Beau? This French surname-name might be an option for a parent unafraid of the unusual. The name derives from Barbel, a type of fish, which is how it became a surname for some fishermen.
  3. Dozier
    • Origin:

      French surname
    • Meaning:

      "from willow"
    • Description:

      Dozier means a person who lives near the willows or reeds. It may be an occupational name referring to a basket maker.
  4. Artist
    • Origin:

      Word name
    • Description:

      About 40 baby boys were named Artist -- not Picasso, not Art -- in the US in one recent year. But not so odd, when you consider all the occupational names, from Sawyer to Sergeant, stylish today. The name Artist is also starting to register on the girls' side of the ledger, making Artist a name as gender-neutral as the occupation.
  5. Reeve
    • Origin:

      English occupational name
    • Meaning:

      "bailiff"
    • Description:

      Chosen by aviators Charles and Anne Lindbergh for their daughter, Reeve is another single-syllable surname waiting to be borrowed by the girls.
  6. Sherman
    • Origin:

      English occupational name
    • Meaning:

      "shearer of woolen cloth"
    • Description:

      Not quite as over-the-hill as Herman, but not far behind either.
  7. Pilot
    • Origin:

      Occupational name
    • Description:

      One celebrity baby Pilot put this occupational choice into the pool -- together with the middle name Inspektor, something we wouldn't advise following.
  8. Falkner
    • Origin:

      Occupational name
    • Meaning:

      "falcon trainer"
    • Description:

      Member of a newly chic name genre. Bonus: its relationship to author William Faulkner.
  9. Lynch
    • Origin:

      Irish
    • Meaning:

      "mariner"
    • Description:

      One Irish surname that will never make it as a first.
  10. Chaucer
    • Origin:

      English
    • Meaning:

      "maker of breeches"
    • Description:

      One of the most distinguished names in literature could become a hero name in a family of poetry-lovers -- or be seen as a trendy new occupational name.
  11. Whistler
    • Origin:

      English occupational name
    • Meaning:

      "one who whistles"
    • Description:

      A new entry is the fashionable new occupational name category -- and a jolly job it must be -- with the added attraction of relating to the great early 20th century American artist James Abbott McNeill Whistler, of "Whistler's Mother" fame.
  12. Hayward
    • Origin:

      English occupational name
    • Meaning:

      "guardian of the hedged enclosure"
    • Description:

      Possible Hayden alternative.
  13. Bouvier
    • Origin:

      French occupational name
    • Meaning:

      "herdsman"
    • Description:

      So tied to being Jacqueline Kennedy's maiden name that it's best saved for a girl.
  14. Bellow
    • Origin:

      English occupational name
    • Meaning:

      "bellows maker"
    • Description:

      Might be an honorific for novelist Saul Bellow, although bellowing is not the gentlest of sounds. Consider Saul instead.
  15. Warden
    • Abbott
      • Origin:

        Aramaic, Hebrew
      • Meaning:

        "father"
      • Description:

        This traditionally male surname name could find new life for girls thanks to its similarity to the popular Abby and Abigail.
    • Draper
      • Origin:

        English occupational name
      • Meaning:

        "cloth merchant"
      • Description:

        Other occupational names would be more commonly accepted, though the Mad Men character has certainly brought it to the fore.
    • Doctor
      • Origin:

        Word name
      • Description:

        Doctor is an honorific used as a name, somewhat like names such as Bishop, King, and Princess. Banned in New Zealand, Doctor can lead to the kind of confusion you may feel would be only positive for your child -- a bona fide Doctor before he even gets to kindergarten. At its zenith in 1884, Doctor was used for 12 boys, but last year it didn't even clear the five-baby minimum to make it onto the Social Security extended list.
    • Drover
      • Origin:

        English occupational surname
      • Meaning:

        "driver of sheep or cattle"
      • Description:

        Drover, an ancient occupational surname, is right in step with today's styles and would make a distinctive choice. Drover and brothers are fresh updates of such now-widely-used names as Carter and Cooper.
    • Navigator
      • Origin:

        Occupational name
      • Description:

        Adventurous and unusual choice from this trendy group in the wild new world of baby names.