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Best Unique Girl Names: Under 50 Births

Best Unique Girl Names: Under 50 Births

Unique girl names given to under 50 American baby girls in 2022 are the gold standard if you're looking for a truly one-of-a-kind name for your daughter.

These highly original girl names were used just a handful of times in the most recent year on record, virtually guaranteeing that your daughter will be the only one you'll ever meet.

Our favorite unique girl names given to fewer than 50 girls include international beauties like Allegra and Colibri, sleek surnames like Tierney and Sinclair, and fresh word names like Holiday and Fable.

Find our most up-to-date list of cool unique girl names under 50 births here, ordered by current popularity on Nameberry.

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Unique Names

Girl Names

  1. OttilieHeart
    • Origin:

      German, French
    • Meaning:

      "prosperous in battle"
    • Description:

      Ottilie is trending in the UK, where the pronounced T helps the name sound pretty and delicate, ala Amelie. Ottilie is less popular in the US, where many Americans pronounce it as a near-homonym for "oddly".
  2. DelphineHeart
    • Origin:

      French from Greek
    • Meaning:

      "of Delphi; womb"
    • Description:

      Delphine is a sleek, chic French name with two nature associations — the dolphin and the delphinium, a bluebell-like flower, a well as a link to the ancient city of Delphi, which the Greeks believed to be the womb of the earth. All of these derive from the Greek word delphus "womb".
  3. IsoldeHeart
    • Origin:

      Welsh, German
    • Meaning:

      "ice ruler"
    • Description:

      Now that Tristan has been rediscovered, maybe it's time for his fabled lover in the Arthurian romances and Wagnerian opera, a beautiful Irish princess, to be brought back into the light as well.
  4. CosimaHeart
    • Origin:

      Italian feminine variation of Cosmo, Greek
    • Meaning:

      "order, beauty, universe"
    • Description:

      Cosima, the kind of elegant and unusual name the British upper classes love to use for their daughters, is given to a handful of baby girls in the US after being chosen by two high-profile celebs in the same month; cool couple Sofia Coppola and Thomas Mars as well as supermodel Claudia Schiffer. It was used earlier by celebrity chef Nigella Lawson, while the male form, Cosimo, was given to the son of Marissa Ribisi and Beck.
  5. SaskiaHeart
    • Origin:

      Dutch
    • Meaning:

      "Saxon"
    • Description:

      From the first time we saw the name Saskia attached to a portrait of Rembrandt's wife (her full name was Saakje van Uylenburgh, but she was always called Saskia), we have found it utterly charming and wondered why it hasn't attracted more fans In this country--she's appreciated by the Brits, who have moved her to Number 392. Saskia is one of those names that's been used in Europe since the Middle Ages, but has never crossed the ocean.
  6. IoneHeart
    • Origin:

      Greek
    • Meaning:

      "violet flower"
    • Description:

      This unusual Greek flower and color name has gained considerable recent attention via actress Ione Skye, who is the daughter of sixties folksinger Donovan.
  7. EnidHeart
    • Origin:

      Welsh
    • Meaning:

      "life, spirit"
    • Description:

      This Celtic goddess and Arthurian name may sound terminally old-ladyish to many ears--but so did names like Ella and Etta not so long ago. So Enid is yet another forgotten four-letter E-possibility: she's has been M.I.A since 1954.
  8. ElspethHeart
    • Origin:

      Scottish variation of Elizabeth
    • Meaning:

      "pledged to God"
    • Description:

      Elspeth is one of those names that never quite made it out of the British Isles--particularly Scotland, but possesses a winningly childlike charm. Elspeth was used by Sir Walter Scott for several of his female characters.
  9. SukiHeart
    • Origin:

      Japanese
    • Meaning:

      "loved one"
    • Description:

      One of the most familiar and usable Asian names.
  10. CyraHeart
    • Origin:

      Persian or Greek
    • Meaning:

      "sun or throne, or lord"
    • Description:

      Cyra is an unusual name that can be pronounced either SEER-a or CY-ra. This name may be a feminine variation of Cyrus but is also a Persian name that stands on its own. One noted bearer is writer Cyra McFadden.
  11. TamsinHeart
    • Origin:

      English, contracted form of Thomasina
    • Meaning:

      "twin"
    • Description:

      Tamsin is an offbeat name occasionally heard in Britain and just waiting to be discovered here. U.K. actress Tamsin Greig is a star of the show Episodes, Tamsin Olivier is the daughter of Joan Plowright and Sir Laurence Olivier..
  12. PandoraHeart
    • Origin:

      Greek
    • Meaning:

      "all gifted"
    • Description:

      Pandora has occasionally been used by the British gentry (for girls with brothers who might be called Peregrine) and is now starting to be heard in the US too: It was given to 39 baby girls last year.
  13. MaudeHeart
    • Origin:

      English and French diminutive of Matilda, German
    • Meaning:

      "battle-mighty"
    • Description:

      Maude, also spelled Maud, is a lacy, mauve-tinted name that was wildly popular a hundred years ago, but has been rarely heard in the past fifty. Some stylish parents are starting to choose it again, especially as a middle.
  14. ManonHeart
    • Origin:

      French, diminutive of Marie
    • Meaning:

      "bitter"
    • Description:

      Manon is an endearing French pet name for Marie or Marianne; it has the international yet straightforward feel that makes it a viable import. Manon of the Spring was a gorgeous French film, Manon Lescaut a 1731 novel by Abbe Prevost, set in France and Louisiana, that was controversial in its day. It formed the basis of operas by Puccini and Massenet, and several films and TV series.
  15. FleurHeart
    • Origin:

      French
    • Meaning:

      "flower"
    • Description:

      Fleur is a generic, delicate flower name that emigrated into the English-speaking world when John Galsworthy bestowed it on one of the Forsytes in his celebrated saga. More recently, there was Fleur Delacour, a French witch and the Beauxbatons champion for the Triwizard Tournament in Harry Potter.
  16. SeraphineHeart
    • Origin:

      French from Hebrew
    • Meaning:

      "burning ones"
    • Description:

      Seraphine is the Gallic version of the angelic name Seraphina. But while Seraphina has been rising rapidly since Jennifer Garner and Ben Affleck chose it for their second daughter, Seraphine has been largely ignored, though we believe the French vowel-sound ending will soon be more stylish than the a-endings that have predominated in girls' names for years.
  17. LilacHeart
    • Origin:

      English, from Persian
    • Meaning:

      "bluish or lilac"
    • Description:

      Could Lilac be the next Lila or Lily or Violet? It certainly has a lot going for it--those lilting double 'l's, the fabulous fragrance it exudes, and the fact that it's a color name as well, providing a ready made nursery theme. In addition, the lilac is symbolic of first love.
  18. NaraHeart
    • Origin:

      Japanese place name or Celtic
    • Meaning:

      "happy"
    • Description:

      Soft, simple, and far more unusual than Tara or Farrah. As a Japanese place name, it's been used occasionally as a surname and is beginning to be used as a first. Nara is also the name of a Hindu (male) God and the name means "man" in Hindi.
  19. AlouetteHeart
    • Origin:

      French
    • Meaning:

      "lark"
    • Description:

      Alouette is a sweet Gallic twist in the stylish bird name genre made familiar via the charming French children's song, Alouette, gentile alouette.
  20. BronteHeart
    • Origin:

      Greek
    • Meaning:

      "thunder"
    • Description:

      This lovely surname of the three novel-writing sisters, now used as a baby name, makes a fitting tribute for lovers of Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights. While the original name took an umlaut over the e, modern English speakers may find that more trouble than it's worth. Trivia note: The Anglo-Irish clergyman who was the father of Charlotte, Emily and Anne changed his name from the original Brunty. According to scholars, the family pronounced the name brun-tee, though in the 21st century world it's commonly pronounced bron-tay. In Australia, the name is more likely to take inspiration from Bronte Beach in Sydney. It was named after Lord Nelson, the 1st Duke of Bronté. He got his title from a town in Sicily, itself named after a mythological Cyclops.