Girl names

  1. Acacia
    • Origin:

      Greek
    • Meaning:

      "thorny"
    • Description:

      Acacia is an attractive, rarely used Greek flower name enhanced by its popular beginning-and-ending-with 'a'-construct, and is gradually beginning to catch on as a new member of the stylish girl names starting with A.
  2. Alannis
    • Origin:

      Spelling variation of Alanis
    • Description:

      Singer Alanis Morisette may have made the one-n version of this name more famous, but like the other Alan feminization Alana or Alanna, the spelling can go either way.
  3. Anniston
    • Origin:

      English surname and American place name
    • Meaning:

      "Anis' town"
    • Description:

      Actor couple Chyler Leigh and Nathan West added this one to the lexicon when they adapted the surname of actress Jennifer Aniston as their daughter's first name. Aniston, which theoretically might mean "Anis' town," (Anis is a medieval form of Agnes) was actually Anglicized from the Greek Anastasopoulos. With its similarity to both Addison and Anna and its relationship to the attractive star, Anniston is taking off a la Jolie.
  4. Araminta
    • Origin:

      Invented hybrid name from Arabella and Aminta
    • Description:

      Araminta is an enchanting eighteenth-century invention familiar in Britain and just beginning to be discovered here. It was used in 1693 by William Congreve in his comedy The Old Bachelor, and in 1705 by the versatile Sir John Vanbrugh, architect of Blenheim Palace as well as a playwright, for his comedy The Confederacy.
  5. Aspen
    • Origin:

      Nature and place-name
    • Description:

      Aspen is part of two groups of stylish and unique baby names: nature names and place-names. The name of a graceful tree in the poplar family with heart-shaped leaves so delicate they quiver in the gentlest breeze, Aspen is also the name of a trendy Colorado ski resort. Aspen started as a unisex name possibility but now is much more frequently worn by girls.
  6. Avenue
    • Beatrix
      • Origin:

        Latin
      • Meaning:

        "she who brings happiness; blessed"
      • Description:

        Beatrix has a solid history of its own apart from Beatrice, with that final x adding a playful, animated note to the name's imposing history.
    • Bebe
      • Origin:

        Diminutive of Beatrice or any other B name
      • Description:

        High-kicking cohort of Coco, Gigi, Fifi, Kiki, et al.
    • Brighton
      • Origin:

        English place-name
      • Description:

        Out-of-the-way place name (it's an antiquated holiday spot on England's south coast) that might make a brilliant choice. Actor/director Jon Favreau named his daughter Brighton Rose.
    • Bexley
      • Caterina
        • Origin:

          Italian variation of Katherine
        • Description:

          If your ancestry is Italian, you may want to consider this elegant twist on a classic.
      • Chrissa
        • Chyler
          • Emerson
            • Origin:

              English
            • Meaning:

              "son of Emery"
            • Description:

              The combination of Emily and Emma's popularity -- and the fact that Desperate Housewives star Teri Hatcher's daughter is named Emerson -- have put this formerly strictly boys’ name, embodying the gravitas of Ralph Waldo Emerson, in the limelight for girls.
          • Everly
            • Origin:

              English
            • Meaning:

              "wild boar in woodland clearing"
            • Description:

              Sweet and stylish, with a sporty, energetic undertone, Everly is a name that ticks lots of boxes.
          • Eagan
            • Evanora
              • Kateri
                • Origin:

                  Mohawk variation of Katherine
                • Meaning:

                  "pure"
                • Description:

                  St. Kateri Teckakwitha is the first Native American saint, canonized in 2012. St. Kateri was the daughter of a Mohawk warrior, born in 1656 in upstate New York. She converted to Christianity at age 20 and died at 24, and was known as "Lily of the Mohawk." Kateri was the name the saint took on, a native variation of Katherine, upon her baptism.