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Literary Girl Names

These literary girl names are derived from female characters in books from all genres and periods. Girl names from children's books are particular popular today, including Alice (in Wonderland) and Eloise (at the Plaza). Literary girl names from classic books such as Scarlett and Scout are fashionable.

Literary names for girls from books that have become television shows or movies such as Game of Thrones or Hunger Games have also found widespread use, with names such as Aria and Katniss used for non-fictional baby girls.

In the literary baby names category, as always, feel free to think about your own personal favorites.

  • Alabama

    Alabama is a hot southern place-name, picking up from Georgia and Savannah. This is not a geographical name come lately, though--there have been girls named Alabama dating back well over a... Read More 

  • Alhambra

    The Alhambra, which means "red city," is in Granada, Spain. British writer Ali Smith used it for a character in her novel The Accidental.Read More 

  • Alia

    Alia is most classic and feminine form of Ali, one of the 99 attributes of Allah. The name is used by Christians, Muslims and Jews; the word Aliyah means to make a pilgrimage to Israel and the... Read More 

  • Alice

    Alice was derived from the Old French name Aalis, a diminutive of Adelais that itself came from the Germanic name Adalhaidis. Adalhaidis, from which the name Adelaide is also derived, is composed... Read More 

  • Alma

    Alma is a somewhat solemn, soulful name that had a burst of popularity a century ago, then faded into the flowered wallpaper, and is now finding its footing once more.

    In addition to... Read More 

  • Amaryllis

    If you love both unique baby names and flower names for girls, Amaryllis might be a perfect choice for you. A showier flower name... Read More 

  • Amoret

    This lovely name from Spenser's The Faerie Queene is borne by a character who represents married love. A related unusual-yet-usable choice: Amabel.Read More 

  • Arabella

    Arabella was used as a given name beginning in the 12th century with the birth of Arabella de Leuchars, granddaughter of William the Lion, King of Scotland. It is derived from the Latin... Read More 

  • Aravis

    Aravis was the name of a female character in C.S. Lewis's A Horse and His Boy, and is also the name of a mountain range in southern France. With the rise of Ava, Avery, and indeed... Read More 

  • Ariadne

    This name of the Cretan goddess of fertility is most popular now as the more melodic Ariana, but Ariadne has possibilities of its own. It first entered the US Top 1000 in 2014. The renewed... Read More 

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