Category: Historic Names

posted by: Tiana Putric View all posts by this author

By Tiana Putric

International Women’s Day is observed all around the world each year on March 8th. This year’s theme calls on all of us to #BeBoldForChange. Meet twelve recent female history makers from Australia to Germany to Jamaica to Switzerland –– many of whom currently hold their country’s highest office and were the first woman to do so.

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Not Your Mother’s Baby Names

1950s baby names

by Pamela Redmond Satran

If your Mom (and Dad) are baffled by your baby name ideas, there’s a reason for that. Baby names that were all the way at the bottom of the extended list in 1957 — a year that saw the birth of many now grandparent-aged people — have become stylish, even popular. So when your parents say they’ve never heard that name you love, you may need to take that literally.

Every generation needs to reinvent baby names. Today’s expectant parents aren’t interested in using the names popular when they were born — Jessie and Jason, Melissa and Michael — and they’re really not interested in using names favored for their parent’s generation in the 1950s or 1960s. So Debra, Karen, Richard, and Gary, names well-represented among grandparents, are out for today’s babies.

But names that were unpopular in the Baby Boom era are a different story. In fact, the bottom of the 1957 popularity list is full of names that sound fresh, elegant, fascinating, beautiful today.

There are patterns in evidence. Names without a clear gender identification were often relegated to the bottom of the barrel back then, as were ethnic names, surname-names, word names, place names, and ancient names. All these groups are of course well-accepted now.

If your parents are eager to talk about baby names but you want to avoid a tussle over the name, share this list with them. All these names were given to only five babies in 1957 but are used for hundreds and in some cases thousands of babies now. What do you think, Mom and Dad?

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By Linda Rosenkrantz

Like our cousins across the pond, we’ve fallen in love with vintage nicknames for our girls—names like Maisie and Mabel and Sadie and Josie and Hattie are already on the rise. But do those parents who want a little Hattie necessarily consider putting Harriet or Henrietta on the birth certificate?

Maybe, maybe not.

In some cases, the adorable short form is actually succeeding in waking up its sleeping mother name. Like Josephine, for instance, and Beatrice. But here are some others whose full versions have not seen as much—if any– action, as adorable as their period nicknames may be.

Which of these cute, often tomboyish, girl nicknames do you think are capable of reviving their more staid Great-Grandma names?

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Presidents Day Baby Names: The Veeps

posted by: Nick View all posts by this author

An FBF look back at some of the often-forgotten Vice Presidents’ names.

By Nick Turner

It’s no surprise that U.S. vice presidents don’t get a lot of respect in history books. The job doesn’t confer much actual power (unless the commander-in-chief comes to an untimely end), relegating most VPs to the footnotes of American statesmanship.

But when it comes to baby-name inspiration, VPs may actually be No. 1. The men who served as second-in-command have had some truly extraordinary monikers — both first and last names — and several of them could work nicely on a 2017 newborn.

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American Baby Names: 15 All-American boys

All American boy names

By Abby Sandel

What makes a boy’s name all-American? We’ve exported a long list of modern names across the English-speaking world – Jayden, Jaxon, and Kai have all been spotted in the UK and Australia. But perhaps the truest red, white, and blue American baby names tie to our history and culture.

They also capture the American spirit in a way that more traditional names might not. George was our first president, but it was also the name of the king against whom we rebelled. American baby names feel rugged and individualistic. While their roots may run deep, they’re not typically ancient names with a long history of use. In fact, many of these are newly popular in the twenty-first century.

Here are fifteen of our favorite all-American boy names.

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