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Two Letter Boy Names

Two Letter Boy Names

Two letter boy names are a short (ahem) elite list. The top 2 letter names for boys, the only 2 letter male names that stand alone in the Top 1000, are Bo and By.

Two letter names may be nickname names or in a few cases names in their own right. Familiar 2 letter nickname names include Ed, Al, and Cy. Two letter boy names we like include Ax, Oz, and Po.

If you're looking for 2 letter names for your baby boy, here is our complete list. The top names below rank among the current US Top 1000 Baby Names and are ordered by popularity. Unique names rank below the Top 1000 and are listed alphabetically.

BoHeart

  • Origin:

    Norse nickname
  • Meaning:

    "to live"
  • Description:

    A popular name in Denmark, in this country Bo has some cowboy swagger and a lot of substance in its minimal two letters. In Mandarin Chinese, Bo means "wave".

OzHeart

  • Origin:

    Hebrew
  • Meaning:

    "strength, powerful, courageous"
  • Description:

    This may be a legitimate Hebrew name denoting power, but to any American kid, it will evoke ruby slippers and a yellow brick road. The full Hebrew name is Ozni, who was a grandson of Jacob in the Bible.

TyHeart

  • Origin:

    Diminutive of various Ty-beginning names
  • Description:

    As Tyler has begun to recede, a number of parents, including the Wayne Gretzkys, have cut straight to the livelier short form.

CyHeart

  • Origin:

    Diminutive of Cyrus
  • Description:

    Where Sam, Max, and Gus may be leading us.

RaHeart

  • Origin:

    Egyptian
  • Meaning:

    "sun"
  • Description:

    The name of the sun god of Egyptian mythology could only be used in combination with a longer name.

HyHeart

  • Origin:

    Diminutive of Hyman, Hebrew
  • Meaning:

    "life"
  • Description:

    Hy was once a nickname for Hyman, a Jewish Anglicization of Chaim. Today it has gone extinct, for obvious reasons.

AxHeart

  • Origin:

    Word name or short form of Axel
  • Description:

    Ax makes a somewhat threatening short form of the popular Axel, given to more than 3000 baby boys last year. It can also be used on its own, though it usually isn't. There were, however, seven baby boys named Axe in the US in 2015.

SiHeart

  • Origin:

    Diminutive of Simon, Hebrew
  • Meaning:

    "the listener"
  • Description:

    Si is an intriguing antique nickname for Simon and Silas, and we’ve also heard it as a short form of names that contain the “sigh” sound, like Josiah and Osiris.

OxHeart

  • Origin:

    English
  • Meaning:

    "working cattle"
  • Description:

    Animal names are booming, but this is one that's never been used — although Boaz, which means "ox" in Hebrew, is starting to see more use. With its connotations of strength, teamwork and perseverance, and cool X sound, well, why not? It would work especially well for a child born in the Chinese Year of the Ox (February 2021-January 2022). If you need a longer version an obvious option is Oxford, but there's also Oxley, Oxton, or a slightly different sound like Oakley or Oswald.

PoHeart

  • Origin:

    Italian river name
  • Description:

    A river (in Italy), a writer (Bronson), a Teletubby: the Bo of the new millennium.

EdHeart

  • Origin:

    Diminutive of Edward et al
  • Meaning:

    "wealthy"
  • Description:

    The most minimalist of names, Ed is decidedly out -- though that usually means it's due to swing back in. More stylish these days: Ned or even Ted.

YuHeart

  • Origin:

    Chinese
  • Meaning:

    "shining brightly"
  • Description:

    Yu the Great founded China's first dynasty, but in this country "Hey, you!" would make this name utterly confusing, in an Abbott and Costello way.

PiHeart

  • Description:

    Most familiar as the name of the titular character in The Life of Pi, in which it was short for Piscine Molitor Patel.

WmHeart

  • Origin:

    Abbreviation of William
  • Description:

    Were boys really named Wm at the turn of the last century, or was the old-timey abbreviation of William simply what was noted on the official records? We're guessing the latter, but as the Social Security Administration counts each spelling of a name in its tally and doesn't presume to change Wm into William (or Bryleigh into Briley, or is it Brylee?), this name stands as is through the ages.