689 Spanish Boy Names (With Meanings & Popularity)

  1. Carlos
    • Origin:

      Spanish variation of Charles
    • Meaning:

      "free man"
    • Description:

      Carlos is the Spanish and Portuguese variation of Charles, which has been used in solid numbers in the US for as long as data has been kept. Carlos has never fallen out of the Top 600, but peaked from the 70s-early 2000s. Today Carlos is still within the Top 200. Notable namesakes include musician Santana, writers Fuentes and Castaneda, and numerous athletes. Carlos Irwin Estevez is the birth name of Charlie Sheen.
  2. Carlo
    • Origin:

      Italian variation of Charles
    • Description:

      Energetic Italian classic that would blend with a surname of any ethnicity.
  3. Jago
    • Origin:

      Spanish and Cornish variation of Jacob
    • Meaning:

      "supplanter"
    • Description:

      Jago is a dashing alternative to overused favorite Jacob.
  4. Leandro
    • Origin:

      Spanish, Portuguese, and Italian variation of Leander
    • Meaning:

      "lion-man"
    • Description:

      Leandro is the Portuguese, Italian, and Spanish variant of the English name Leander. A blend of two Latin words (Leo "lion" and Andro "man"), Leandro is a name that suggests its bearer has strength and power. Despite this very masculine meaning, Leandro also has a long romantic history, beginning with the myth of Hero and Leander (Ero et Leandro in Latin) to being an important figure in the history of the beautiful Spanish city of Seville.
  5. Matheo
    • Origin:

      Scandinavian variation of Mateo, Spanish
    • Meaning:

      "gift of God"
    • Description:

      With Mateo making its first ever appearance in the US Top 10 in 2023, its Scandinavian variant Matheo borrowed some of its spotlight and appeared in the Top 1000 for the first time.
  6. Esai
    • Origin:

      Spanish from Hebrew
    • Meaning:

      "gift"
    • Description:

      This Hebrew-Latin name, which bristles with electricity, is associated with Esai Morales, who is a junior, carrying on his father's name.
  7. Helio
    • Origin:

      Spanish
    • Meaning:

      "the sun"
    • Description:

      More familiar to English speakers in the Italian Elio form.
  8. Alonzo
    • Origin:

      Italian diminutive of Alphonso
    • Meaning:

      "noble, ready"
    • Description:

      Alonzo is dashing and debonair, with a large measure of Latin flair.
  9. Joaquin
    • Origin:

      Spanish variation of Joachim
    • Meaning:

      "God will judge"
    • Description:

      Actor Joaquin Phoenix (brother of River, Rain, Liberty and Summer) highlighted this one, then Kelly Ripa began talking about younger son Joaquin on her daily TV show, and presto—it's now one of the hottest and most appealing multicultural baby boy names.
  10. Raul
    • Origin:

      Spanish variation of Ralph
    • Meaning:

      "wolf counsel"
    • Description:

      Raul and French brother Raoul are much more appealing than flat-footed daddy Ralph. Puerto Rican actor Raul Julia, who starred in the Addams Family movies, brought fame to the name before his death in 1994.
  11. Marcello
    • Origin:

      Italian and Spanish
    • Meaning:

      "young warrior"
    • Description:

      Based on the ancient name Marcellus, drawn from Mars the god of war, Marcello -- it's pronounced mar-chell-o -- is one of the most lush and attractive Latin names.
  12. Luciano
    • Origin:

      Italian variation of Lucian
    • Meaning:

      "light"
    • Description:

      A vibrant, operatic Latin choice.
  13. Matias
    • Origin:

      Spanish variation of Matthias
    • Description:

      The single T version of Matias is, like Mateo, the Spanish variation of the Hebrew Biblical Matthias or Matthew, while the double T version as in Mattias and Matteo is usually Italian.
  14. Sergio
    • Origin:

      Italian and Spanish variation of Sergius, Roman family name
    • Description:

      Widely heard in both Italian and Spanish households, Sergio and his many international brothers are rooted in Sergius, one of the original Roman family names. The meaning is unknown, but possibly is related to servant or protector.
  15. Miguel
    • Origin:

      Spanish and Portuguese variation of Michael, Hebrew
    • Meaning:

      "Who is like God"
    • Description:

      Mike Tyson put a twist on his own name by naming a son Miguel. It's the first name of Cervantes, the great Spanish novelist and poet who wrote Don Quixote.
  16. Javier
    • Origin:

      Spanish variation of Xavier
    • Description:

      One of the most popular Spanish names for boys in the US, Javier is embodied for many Americans in the magnetic persona of Spanish-born Oscar-nominated actor Javier Bardem.
  17. Alejandro
    • Origin:

      Spanish variation of Alexander
    • Meaning:

      "defending men"
    • Description:

      Softer and smoother than Alexander, this classic Spanish name for boys has made a seamless transition to this culture. Adding to its current impact: the Lady Gaga song Alejandro .
  18. Carmen
    • Origin:

      Spanish variation of Carmel; from Latin Carmen meaning song.
    • Description:

      While the variation Carmine is more familiar for boys, Carmen has also been used as a masculine name; consider the very macho Carmen Basilio — the American boxer famous for defeating the great Sugar Ray Robinson — or composer Carmen Dragon.
  19. Alvaro
    • Origin:

      Spanish
    • Meaning:

      "elf warrior"
    • Description:

      A well-used Spanish saint's name with a lot of flair that could definitely cross over to more general usage. It reached its peak in the United States in 1985, when it ranked Number 456. In Spain, Alvaro is a Top 20 boys' name.
  20. Jose
    • Origin:

      Spanish and Portuguese version of Joseph
    • Meaning:

      "Jehovah increases"
    • Description:

      Jose is as widespread in the Hispanic community as Joseph and Joe are elsewhere in the U.S., though its numbers here are starting to decrease somewhat. Jose is one of those Spanish baby names that has never crossed over into the Anglo naming culture.