Boarding school names | Liesl's lists

Typical names for girls at boarding schools. If you like more, read the Mallory Towers series by Enid Blyton :) .
  1. Alice
    • Origin:

      German
    • Meaning:

      "noble"
    • Description:

      Alice is a classic literary name that's both strong and sweet, ranking in the US Top 100 and popular throughout the western world. Alice is derived from the Old French name Aalis, a diminutive of Adelais that itself came from the Germanic name Adalhaidis, which is composed of the Proto-Germanic elements aþala, meaning "noble," and haidu, "kind, appearance, type."
  2. Angeline
    • Origin:

      French variation of Angela
    • Meaning:

      "angel"
    • Description:

      With Angelina becoming so popular thanks to Ms. Jolie, this could be a new twist—but everyone will always misunderstand it as Angelina. While it currently ranks at Number 951 in the US, it's Number 352 in France.
  3. Ann
    • Origin:

      English variation of Hebrew Hannah
    • Meaning:

      "grace"
    • Description:

      Ann, the name of the sainted mother of the Virgin Mary, was among the top girls’ names for centuries, in both the original English Ann spelling and the French Anne. Both left the Top 100 around 1970 and show no signs of returning, with Anne is the middle of the US Top 1000 and Ann dropped out of sight.
  4. Becky
    • Origin:

      Diminutive of Rebecca
    • Description:

      One of those casual down-home names last popular in the 1960s.
  5. Bessie
    • Origin:

      Diminutive of Elizabeth
    • Meaning:

      "pledged to God"
    • Description:

      After a century of association with horses and cows, this name just could be ready for revival by a fearless baby namer -- after all, it did happen to Jessie and Becky.
  6. Conny
    • Darrell
      • Origin:

        French
      • Meaning:

        "dear one, beloved"
      • Description:

        Once exclusively male name, Daryl Hannah made the Darrell spelling just as appropriate for girls -- and maybe even more feminine than masculine these days.
    • Diana
      • Origin:

        Latin
      • Meaning:

        "divine"
      • Description:

        Diana, the tragic British princess, inspired many fashions, but strangely, not one for her name. For us, Diana is a gorgeous and still-underused choice.
    • Emily
      • Origin:

        Feminine variation of Emil, Latin
      • Meaning:

        "rival"
      • Description:

        Emily may have dropped somewhat in the current standings, but it was the most popular girls' name for over a decade because it appeals on many levels: Emily is feminine, classic, simple, pretty, and strong. Emily is Number 1 among Gen Z names. It also has those nice literary namesakes, like Emily Dickinson and Emily Brontë.
    • Evie
      • Origin:

        Diminutive of Eve or Eva
      • Meaning:

        "life"
      • Description:

        Evie was derived from Eve, which in turn comes from Chawwah, a Hebrew name related to the concept of life. Evie can be used as a nickname for any name that starts with Ev-, including Eva, Evelyn, and Evangeline, but also for names such as Genevieve and Maeve. Evie is typically pronounced with a long E sound, but a short E is also valid.
    • Irene
      • Origin:

        Greek
      • Meaning:

        "peace"
      • Description:

        Serene Irene, the name of the Greek goddess of peace and one of the most familiar Greek goddess names, was hugely popular in ancient Rome and again in the United States a hundred years ago.
    • Jill
      • Origin:

        Diminutive of Gillian or Juliana
      • Meaning:

        "youthful"
      • Description:

        Probably due to its nursery rhyme association, Jill has the perpetual air of a rosy-cheeked tot -- even though it is one of the oldest names on the roster, a medieval variation on the Roman Julia. The pairing of Jack and Jill to connote a generic boy and girl goes back at least to the fifteenth century. But can knowing Jill's history keep it from sounding like a cute mid-twentieth century invention? There may be some possibility of Jill making it back up the hill.
    • Marion
      • Origin:

        English and French diminutive of Marie
      • Meaning:

        "drop of the sea, bitter, or beloved"
      • Description:

        An underused classic that has proved surprisingly unisex over the last few decades, being given to roughly the same number of baby girls and boys in the US from the 1970s to the 2000s. For a girl, Marion has a sturdy old-fashioned charm.
    • Missy
      • Origin:

        English, diminutive of Melissa
      • Description:

        A name that works until your daughter is, say, six.
    • Patricia
      • Origin:

        Latin
      • Meaning:

        "noble, patrician"
      • Description:

        Patricia still sounds patrician, though its scores of nicknames definitely don't. Wildly popular from the forties (alternately Number 3 and 4 throughout the decade) to the sixties, Patricia has been fading ever since. But a comeback in its full form is definitely conceivable—just look at Penelope.
    • Poppy
      • Origin:

        English from Latin
      • Meaning:

        "red flower"
      • Description:

        Poppy, unlike most floral names which are sweet and feminine, has a lot of spunk. Long popular throughout the rest of the English-speaking world, Poppy is finally starting to rise toward the top in the US, where it entered the Top 1000 for the first time in 2016.
    • Pitty
      • Sally
        • Origin:

          Diminutive of Sarah
        • Meaning:

          "princess"
        • Description:

          Sally is a cheerful, fresh-faced girl-next-door name that was originally a nickname for Sarah, but has long been used independently. Sally was popular in the eighteenth century and then again from the 1920s to the 1960s--it was just outside the Top 50 around 1940. Though it hasn't been heard as a baby name for decades, we can see Sally bouncing back, especially after her exposure as young Ms. Draper on Mad Men--the Nameberries rank it at Number 621, and it's a Top 100 name in Sweden.
      • Sandy
        • Origin:

          Diminutive of Sandra or Alexandra
        • Description:

          Nickname name hep in the era of Grease.
      • Sylvia
        • Origin:

          Latin
        • Meaning:

          "from the forest"
        • Description:

          The musical, sylvan Sylvia seems poised to join former friends Frances and Beatrice and Dorothy back in the nursery.