Hurricane Names

Featuring the rotating six lists used to name hurricanes. This list does not include the names that have been retired from the lists (ie Karina, Harvey, Irma)
  1. Alberto
    • Origin:

      Germanic
    • Meaning:

      "noble, bright"
    • Description:

      Alberto is the Italian, Spanish and Portuguese variation of Albert and lends a more unusual and fashionable edge to this name which is still a grandpa name to many.
  2. Alex
    • Origin:

      Diminutive of Alexander, Alexis
    • Meaning:

      "defending men"
    • Description:

      The independent Alex has become a classic in its own right. One of the truest unisex names, Alex is used almost equally for both sexes. Alex is used both on its own and as a short form of formal names of both genders, such as Alexander, Alexandra, and Alexis.
  3. Ana
    • Origin:

      Variation of Hannah
    • Meaning:

      "grace"
    • Description:

      Confident and compact, Ana is a widely used variation of the Biblical Hannah. Favored in Spain, Slovenia, Bosnia, Portugal, and Croatia, this shorter spelling has the same substance and versatility of its longer counterparts.
  4. Andrea
    • Origin:

      Feminine variation of Andrew, Greek
    • Meaning:

      "strong and manly"
    • Description:

      Andrea — a feminine form of Andrew (and a male name in several European cultures) — comes with a good selection of pronunciations — ANN-dree-a, AHN-dree-a, or ahn-DRAY-a — each with a slightly different image: girl next door/slightly affected/downright mysterious
  5. Arlene
    • Origin:

      English
    • Description:

      Popular in the US from the 1920s to the 1950s, Arlene is of uncertain origin and seems to be a modern innovation, perhaps based on names like Marlene and Darlene which were popular around the same time. Nowadays, the -lene names are mostly outdated, although the recent rise of retro Arlette could make Arlene seem plausible again as well.
  6. Arthur
    • Origin:

      Celtic
    • Meaning:

      " bear"
    • Description:

      Arthur, once the shining head of the Knights of the Round Table, is, after decades of neglect, now being polished up and restored by stylish parents, inspired perhaps by the new generation of royals. Arthur has led the list of possible names for the young British princes, chosen as a middle name for Prince Louis, son of William and Catherine, Prince and Princess of Wales.
  7. Barry
    • Origin:

      Irish
    • Meaning:

      "spear"
    • Description:

      This Anglicized form of Bearach or short form of Finbarr was in the Top 200 in the USA for 50 years until the early 80s when it rapidly fell out of favor. Barry has not yet found popularity in the modern era - but that may well change as people rediscover their love of classic figures like musician Barry White, baseballer Barry Bonds or even Barack Obama, whose nickname as a young man was Barry.
  8. Bertha
    • Origin:

      German
    • Meaning:

      "bright, glorious"
    • Description:

      Ever since the enormous German cannon was dubbed by Allied soldiers "Big Bertha" in World War I, this name hasn't worked for a sweet little baby girl. But this was not always so. Hard as it might be to imagine now, Bertha was a Top 100 name until the 1930s, and in the 1880s was the seventh most popular name in the land--the equal of Joseph.
  9. Beryl
    • Origin:

      Greek
    • Meaning:

      "sea-green jewel"
    • Description:

      Dated British favorite that never caught on in this country, where Jade remains the green gem of choice. Interesting namesakes: British writer Beryl Bainbridge and British aviatrix Beryl Markham.
  10. Bill
    • Origin:

      English, diminutive of William
    • Meaning:

      "resolute protection"
    • Description:

      Most Bills today are dads...or grandpas. The younger Williams are usually nicknamed Will, or called by their full names.
  11. Bonnie
    • Origin:

      Scottish
    • Meaning:

      "beautiful, cheerful"
    • Description:

      Bonnie is an adorable nickname name, heading back up the popularity list after a 50-year nap. A Top 100 girls' name throughout the rest of the English-speaking world, Americans are later to jump on the Bonnie bandwagon but now it's trending here too.
  12. Bret
    • Origin:

      Spelling variation of Brett
    • Description:

      There are 15 times as many baby boys named Brett than Bret, but this sleeker version is used and has some merits, namely, being sleeker.
  13. Chantal
    • Origin:

      French
    • Meaning:

      "stone, boulder"
    • Description:

      Though associated with a French saint noted for her holiness and strength of character, this name is somewhat dated and it might be better to look to one of the more modern names popular for little girls in France today: Oceane, Lea, Manon.
  14. Chris
    • Origin:

      English nickname for Christian, Christopher
    • Meaning:

      "one who carries Christ"
    • Description:

      Chris is a long-running nickname used almost equally for boys and girls. While past its prime, Chris stands out as sounding completely appropriate for both sexes, perhaps because of its widespread use as a short form of both the popular Christopher and Christine. Chris manages to retain its crisp appeal even though its fashion moment is over.
  15. Cindy
    • Origin:

      Diminutive of Cynthia or Lucinda
    • Description:

      Cindy as a name in its own right made it into the Top 20 in 1957 and remained a Top 200 girls' name until the end of the 20th century. Although it's fallen precipitously since then and left the Top 1000 completely in 2015, Cindy remains a name commonly heard in the US. Today, though, it would more likely be attached to moms or grandmas than to babies.
  16. Claudette
    • Origin:

      French, feminine variation of Claude
    • Meaning:

      "lame; enclosure"
    • Description:

      Once seen as a dated French Claudette-Colbert feminization, along with Annette and Paulette, we can see Claudette moving into a more plausible Colette-Cosette arena. While some may be put off by the common "lame" meaning, some etymologists theorize that the name may relate to the word for enclosure or clause, an alternate meaning that may appeal to a child with a form of this otherwise-appealing name.
  17. Colin
    • Origin:

      English diminutive of Nicholas or Irish and Scottish
    • Meaning:

      "people of victory; pup"
    • Description:

      Thanks to its dashing Anglo-Irish image — due partly to Colins Firth and Farrell — and its C-initialed two-syllable sound, Colin and its cousin Collin have enjoyed a long run of popularity, reaching as high as Number 84 in 2004.
  18. Cristobal
    • Origin:

      Spanish variation of Christopher
    • Meaning:

      "bearer of Christ"
    • Description:

      The first name of famed designer Balenciaga, was also the birth name of Christopher Columbus--aka Cristobal Colon. A name still well used in the Hispanic community.
  19. Danielle
    • Origin:

      French feminine variation of Daniel, Hebrew,"God is my judge"
    • Meaning:

      "God is my judge"
    • Description:

      Along with Daniela, Michelle, Nicole, and Denise, Danielle was a big hit from the 1960s to the nineties, sitting comfortably in the Top 20 for several years. Parents then responded to its chic, sophisticated Gallic image, and though it has lost some of its sheen, it's still a widely used choice. Novelist Danielle Steele is its most well-known bearer; it's also the name of Elvis's granddaughter.
  20. Danny
    • Description:

      A diminutive of Daniel that's been immortalized in odes ranging from 'Danny Boy' to 'Danny's Song.'