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MOST POPULAR ROOMBA NAMES

Thinking of naming your Roomba? Do you want to name your baby after a Roomba? Then look no further because this is a complied list of the most hardworking, dedicated, and popular Roombas of the web and Roomba comment section. You're welcome.
  1. AlfredHeart
    • Origin:

      English
    • Meaning:

      "wise counselor; elf counsel"
    • Description:

      Alfred is up off his recliner! If you're looking for a path to Fred, you can go directly to Frederick or take the long way around with the so-out-it's-in-again Alfred. Alfred is quite popular in several European countries, especially England and Wales, Norway, Sweden, and Denmark.
  2. BensonHeart
    • Origin:

      English
    • Meaning:

      "son of Ben"
    • Description:

      Benson has outgrown its long association with a wisecracking TV butler. Parents may see it as an alternate route to nickname Ben, very different in image than the biblical Benjamin. Benson also carries the patronymic theme made popular by Jackson, Harrison, and Jefferson. More recently, Olivia Benson of Law and Order: SVU has reclaimed this as a surname. On a less salubrious note, Benson is still connected to the cigarette brand Benson and Hedges.
  3. BrendaHeart
    • Origin:

      Scottish
    • Meaning:

      "blade of a sword"
    • Description:

      First the heroine of Sir Walter Scott's 1822 novel The Pirate, then a glamorous 1940s debutante, then the troubled twin on Beverly Hills 90210, and now fading in favor of more modern Brenna, Briana, and Bryn. Much more likely to be worn by a mother or grandmother these days. The song "Brenda's Got a Baby" was late rap megastar Tupac's debut single.
  4. BuckyHeart
    • BestieHeart
      • C3P0Heart
        • CharlieHeart
          • Origin:

            English, diminutive of Charles
          • Meaning:

            "free man"
          • Description:

            Charlie derives, of course, from the classic name Charles which, in turn, comes from a German word meaning "free man." Charles became very popular in France during the Middle Ages due to the fame of Charles the Great, also known as Charlemagne. Charley is an alternate spelling.
        • CocoHeart
          • Origin:

            Spanish and French pet name
          • Description:

            Coco came to prominence as the nickname of the legendary French designer Chanel (born Gabrielle) and has lately become a starbaby favorite, initially chosen by Courteney Cox for her daughter Coco Riley in 2004. At first it was the kind of name that the press loves to ridicule, but we predict Coco's heading for more broad acceptance and even popularity.
        • Cat SitterHeart
          • DaseyHeart
            • DustyHeart
              • Elizabeth RuthHeart
                • FredHeart
                  • Origin:

                    German, diminutive of Frederick and Alfred
                  • Description:

                    Where have all the Freds gone? We haven't seen many since the days of Flintstone and Munster. But it could be time for a comeback--if you think more of the sophistication of Fred Astaire, and of other nice guy names like Jack and Charlie and Sam.
                • HalHeart
                  • Origin:

                    Diminutive of Harold and Henry
                  • Description:

                    Could Hal be the Jack, Max, or Gus of the future? It just might happen in the new nickname environment. Hank Azaria put it on his son's birth certificate.
                • HankHeart
                  • Origin:

                    Diminutive of Henry, German
                  • Meaning:

                    "estate ruler"
                  • Description:

                    Hank is a midcentury guy nickname (which actually dates back to the seventeenth century) of the Al/Hal/Dick school, which has been on recess from the playground for decades. Now it's just beginning to be given on its own again, appreciated for its earthy, sportsguy cool. Hanks Aaron and Greenberg (born Henry) and Hank Williams (born Hiram) Sr and Jr. are worthy namesakes.
                • HarrietHeart
                  • Origin:

                    English variation of French Henriette
                  • Meaning:

                    "estate ruler"
                  • Description:

                    Harriet has long been considered a stylish, upscale name in England, but it's still waiting to be revived in the US—though some parents seeking a solid, serious semi-classic are beginning to consider it.
                • HarryHeart
                  • Origin:

                    Diminutive of Henry
                  • Meaning:

                    "estate ruler"
                  • Description:

                    Harry is the medieval English form of Henry, which derived from the Germanic name Heimrich, meaning "estate ruler." Harry was the nickname of all eight King Henrys; it is also a diminutive of Harold and Harrison.
                • HazelHeart
                  • Origin:

                    English
                  • Meaning:

                    "the hazelnut tree"
                  • Description:

                    Hazel has a pleasantly hazy, brownish-green-eyed, old-fashioned image that more and more parents are choosing to share. Former Old Lady name Hazel reentered the popularity lists in 1998 and now is near the top of the charts.
                • JakeHeart
                  • Origin:

                    Hebrew, diminutive of Jacob
                  • Meaning:

                    "supplanter"
                  • Description:

                    This unpretentious, accessible, and optimistic ("everything's jake" -- meaning OK) short form of the top name Jacob is itself widely used, though more parents these days are opting for the full name Jacob. Jake (born Jacob) Gyllenhall is its most prominent current bearer.
                • JamesHeart
                  • Origin:

                    English variation of Jacob, Hebrew
                  • Meaning:

                    "supplanter"
                  • Description:

                    James is one of the classic Anglo-Saxon names, a stalwart through the ages that is more popular—and yes, stylish—than ever today. It recently came out Number 1 in a poll of America's favorite boys' baby names, and is the most common male name, counting people of all ages, in the US.