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Crazy Nicknames for Boys

Crazy Nicknames for Boys

Crazy nicknames for boys are not often found on the birth certificate. There are a couple you can make a strong case for — such as Bo, Buddy, and Ziggy — but some are so outdated, and yes, crazy, that we don’t see them making a comeback. Can you imagine meeting a baby called Dickie or Jocko today?

Along with Dickie and Jocko, some of the crazy nicknames for boys include Bubba, Cuddy, Handy, Jimbo, Loney, Newt, Oddie, and Sax. Crazy names make good names for fictional characters, though; Biff, Doogie, Moby, and Rambo are all connected to famous characters.

Crazy nicknames can be wearable — just ask celebrities like Buzz Aldrin, Chevy Chase, Ringo Starr, and Tiger Woods. Here, view our roster of the wackiest nicknames for boys, past and present.

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Nicknames for Boys

Crazy Nicknames for Girls

Nicknames: The Ultimate Guide

  1. BearHeart
    • Origin:

      Animal name
    • Meaning:

      "bear"
    • Description:

      Bear has suddenly lumbered onto the baby name landscape. Perhaps inspired by British adventurer Bear Grylls (born Edward Michael), first celebrity chef Jamie Oliver used it as the middle name for his boy Buddy, and more recently Alicia Silverstone called her son Bear Blu., followed by Kate Winslet's Bear Blaize. It's part of a current trend normalizing once aggressive animal names like Wolf and Fox. Bear is now Number 218 on Nameberry and in the Top 900 in England.
  2. SonnyHeart
    • Origin:

      English
    • Meaning:

      "son"
    • Description:

      Sonny is one of the generic boy nickname names making a surprise reappearance, and it was recently used by actor Jason Lee. Another surprise: It's been on the US Top 1000 list every year since 1927, reaching a peak in 1975, when it hit Number 428.
  3. ZiggyHeart
    • Origin:

      German, diminutive of Siegfried and Sigmund
    • Description:

      The ultimate nicknamey name, à la Ziggy Stardust or the comic-strip character Ziggy. Then again, there's Ziggy Marley, and most anything Marley is cool. Originally named David, his father Bob Marley gave him the nickname "Ziggy" due to the soccer move of the same name.
  4. BoHeart
    • Origin:

      Norse nickname
    • Meaning:

      "to live"
    • Description:

      A popular name in Denmark, in this country Bo has some cowboy swagger and a lot of substance in its minimal two letters. In Mandarin Chinese, Bo means "wave".
  5. DickHeart
    • Origin:

      Diminutive of Richard
    • Meaning:

      "dominant ruler"
    • Description:

      Dick was a once-common short form of Richard; replaced by Rick or Richie, and finally by the full name itself. Rude meaning -- make that two rude meanings -- pretty much knocks this one out of consideration.
  6. FritzHeart
    • Origin:

      German, diminutive of Friedrich or Frederick
    • Meaning:

      "peaceful ruler"
    • Description:

      Since female cousins Mitzi and Fritzi have entered the realm of possibilities, there's a chance that Cousin Fritz could as well. Fritz is the name of several notables, from early German-born film director Lang to early footballer Fritz (born Frederick) Pollard, the first African-American to play in the Rose Bowl in 1916.
  7. KipHeart
    • Origin:

      American diminution of Christopher
    • Description:

      Kip Thorne, nobel laureate and long-time colleague of Stephen Hawking, is just one of several Kips who don't have a longer name.
  8. BuddyHeart
    • Origin:

      English, nickname name
    • Description:

      Until recently it was rarely used as a proper name; Buddy Holly, for example, was christened Charles, and Salinger's Buddy Glass was born Webb. Celebrity chef Jamie Oliver did name his fourth child Buddy Bear Maurice--a fittingly named brother to Poppy Honey Rosie, Daisy Boo Pamela and Petal Blossom Rainbow, and singer Tom Fletcher has a double-nicknamed Buddy Bob.
  9. DukeHeart
    • Origin:

      English rank of nobility
    • Description:

      While John Wayne and Duke Ellington are worthy role models, the reason Duke is currently enjoying a revival and returned to the Top 1000 in 2013 as one of the year's fastest-rising boys’ names is more likely due to the name given to high-profile TV couple Giuliana and Bill Rancic. Christened Edward Duke, he has always been called by his middle name, just as Edward Duke Ellington was. Duke is just one of several aristocratic titles being increasingly used by ordinary citizens.
  10. PippinHeart
    • Origin:

      Variation of Pepin
    • Meaning:

      "awe-inspiring"
    • Description:

      Super-sweet name that was the title of a Broadway play -- but best known as a type of apple. The Dutch variation is Pepijn is finding some popularity in that country, where short nickname names are stylish.
  11. PipHeart
    • Origin:

      English, diminutive of Philip
    • Meaning:

      "lover of horses"
    • Description:

      The original Pip was the main character in Great Expectations (full name Philip Pirrip). Cute for a tike, maybe too cute for an adult.
  12. OdieHeart
    • Origin:

      Diminutive of Odell, Otis; English, German
    • Meaning:

      "of the valley; wealthy"
    • Description:

      This old-timey nickname for Otis and Odell is strongly tied to Garfield’s canine companion in the Garfield comic, movie, and TV franchise.
  13. JebHeart
    • Origin:

      Diminutive of Jebediah, Hebrew
    • Meaning:

      "beloved friend"
    • Description:

      Both Jeb and Jed are very attractive Old Testament short forms with long and bright futures. Jeb's main current association is with the Bush brother and former governor of Florida, but the name was a mainstay on early TV westerns, and then went upscale as the nickname (his birth name being Josiah) of the President on "The West Wing."
  14. BazHeart
    • Origin:

      Diminutive of Sebastian or Basil; Kurdish
    • Meaning:

      "regal; falcon"
    • Description:

      As Bas, it's a popular name in The Netherlands, but Baz, as in director Luhrmann, has potential for independent life too.

      Curiously, Australian-born Moulin Rouge director Luhrmann was born neither Sebastian nor Basil, but had the name Mark Anthony on his birth certificate; his nickname arose from his supposed resemblance to a British TV fox puppet named Basil Brush.

  15. BanditHeart
    • Origin:

      Word or occupational name
    • Description:

      We hesitate to call Bandit an occupational name, any more than Rogue or Vandal are occupational names, yet its use by one of the bandmembers of My Chemical Romance (for his daughter: we're not even going to go there) undoubtedly owes a debt to occupational cousins from Pilot to Parker. Recommended for use by rock stars with full-time nannies only.
  16. TripHeart
    • Origin:

      Word name
    • Description:

      This began as a nickname, usually for someone who was a "third," as in William III. But in an age where any noun goes, this could be thought of as representing a little voyager -- hopefully not into psychedelic realms.
  17. NewtHeart
    • Origin:

      English
    • Meaning:

      "a small salamander"
    • Description:

      Rarely used on its own and irrevocably tied to former House Speaker Gingrich -- who was christened Newton.
  18. BiffHeart
    • Origin:

      American nickname
    • Description:

      The quintessential midcentury nickname, famously found in Arthur Miller's play "Death of a Salesman."
  19. IggyHeart
    • Origin:

      Latin, diminutive of Ignatius
    • Meaning:

      "fiery"
    • Description:

      Iggy is the quintessential pop star name, though it's the nickname Cate Blanchett uses for son Ignatius. Iggy does bring any grander-sounding name down to earth.
  20. JontyHeart
    • Origin:

      Diminutive of Jonathan
    • Meaning:

      "gift of Jehovah"
    • Description:

      Jaunty, to say the least, Jonty might be an option if Johnny feels too old school. It has been noticed most often on the playing fields, as in U.K. rugby player Jonty Parkin (born Jonathan) and South African cricketer Jonty Rhodes (Jonathon).