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Prince Names

  1. MariusHeart
    • Origin:

      Latin, from a Roman family name related to Mars, the god of war
    • Description:

      Marius, frequently heard in Germany and France, is a slightly fusty yet accessible name that has (Les Mis) to Anne Rice. With the rise in interest in such Latin names as Maximus and Atticus, Marius might start attracting more attention. Mario, the Italian, Spanish and Portuguese version of Marius, is much more widely used.
  2. NikolaiHeart
    • Origin:

      Russian variation of Nicholas
    • Meaning:

      "people of victory"
    • Description:

      Russian forms, like Russian supermodels, are hot these days. This is a strong, worldly way to make Nicholas new; it was chosen for his son by Barry Bonds, Jr. Nikolai also comes with several attractive nickname options, including approachable Nik, spunky Niko, or even hip Kai. A traditional nickname for Nikolai in Russia is Kolya.
  3. ChristianHeart
    • Origin:

      Greek or English from Latin
    • Meaning:

      "anointed one or follower of Christ"
    • Description:

      The name Christian has fallen a bit from its 90's and 00's heights, but it's still quite popular. Once considered overly pious, Christian is now seen as making a bold statement of faith by some, while also having secular appeal for others, perhaps influenced by such celebrities as Christian Slater and Christian Bale, not to mention the fashion world's Dior, Lacroix, Louboutin and Audigier.
  4. ValentinHeart
    • Origin:

      French, German, Russian, Czech, Scandinavian variation of Valentine
    • Meaning:

      "strength, health"
    • Description:

      Romantic name used throughout Europe, though sure to lead to pronunciation problems here. Though it's never been too widely used in the US, it's quite popular in Switzerland, France, Austria, and Romania.
  5. EmmanuelHeart
    • Origin:

      Hebrew
    • Meaning:

      "God is with us"
    • Description:

      Emmanuel--spelled with one or two 'm's'-- was popular with early Jewish immigrants, until overused nickname Manny caused it to fade. Now, this important biblical name is being revived in its full glory.
  6. MaelHeart
    • Origin:

      French or Breton
    • Meaning:

      "chief or prince"
    • Description:

      The name of a fifth century Breton saint, Mael is a popular boys' name in contemporary France. Usually spelled with a diaeresis or umlaut -- two dots -- over the e, the pronunciation is almost like the English word mile, if drawn out slightly to two syllables. But this is not evident to English speakers from the spelling and is undoubtedly one reason why this name's popularity has not crossed the borders of its native country.
  7. HenrikHeart
    • Origin:

      Danish and Hungarian variation of Henry
    • Description:

      The long history and solid usage of Henry has infiltrated other cultures, where a number of variations experience the same degree of popularity. In the US, Henrik first entered the Top 1000 in 2014. In Norway, Henrik is a mega popular choice.
  8. LeopoldHeart
    • Origin:

      German
    • Meaning:

      "brave people"
    • Description:

      This aristocratic, somewhat formal Germanic route to the popular Leo is a royal name: Queen Victoria used it to honor a favorite uncle, King Leopold of Belgium. Though Leopold sounds as if it might be a leonine name, it's not really a relative of such choices as Leon, and Leonard.
  9. AmirHeart
    • Origin:

      Arabic or Hebrew
    • Meaning:

      "prince, ruler; treetop"
    • Description:

      A common Middle Eastern name, the general title for an elevated official. Amir has rising in use since the late 70s, and is now in the Top 200. The feminine variation Amira is also on the rise. Amir is in the Top 100 in France, Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, and Belgium. The widespread popularity of the name Amir around the world has led to a large number of notable Amirs in history and present. The name Amir was chosen for his son by actor Omar Epps. Amir is also the name of the young narrator and protagonist in the award-winning novel Kite Runner.
  10. PabloHeart
    • Origin:

      Spanish variation of Paul
    • Meaning:

      "small"
    • Description:

      Pablo, the commonly used Spanish version of Paul, has the added bonus of some fantastic artistic bearers: painter Picasso, cellist Casals, and poet Neruda. Pablo has been consistently in the US charts since records began, and has been within the Top 500 since the mid 60s. However, Pablo has never cracked the Top 200, making it familiar but not overused or tired.
  11. CarlosHeart
    • Origin:

      Spanish variation of Charles
    • Meaning:

      "free man"
    • Description:

      Carlos is the Spanish and Portuguese variation of Charles, which has been used in solid numbers in the US for as long as data has been kept. Carlos has never fallen out of the Top 600, but peaked from the 70s-early 2000s. Today Carlos is still within the Top 200. Notable namesakes include musician Santana, writers Fuentes and Castaneda, and numerous athletes. Carlos Irwin Estevez is the birth name of Charlie Sheen.
  12. RegulusHeart
    • Origin:

      Latin
    • Meaning:

      "prince"
    • Description:

      The traditional name of the brightest star in the constellation Leo and a minor character in the "Harry Potter" series might be a good pick for parents interested in a regal name but turned off by the blatancy of Royalty and King. The nickname Reggie is all but inevitable, for better or worse.
  13. NicolasHeart
    • Origin:

      Spelling variation of Nicholas
    • Meaning:

      "people of victory"
    • Description:

      Nicolas is the French and Spanish form, or streamlined spelling, of Nicholas, popularized by actor Nicolas Cage. Nicolas has been consistently on the charts since Social Security began releasing data, but the name did not truly take off until around the 70s. Today Nicolas is popular among Spanish and Portuguese-speaking parents, ranking in the Top 30 in Spain, Brazil, and Chile.
  14. StefanHeart
    • Origin:

      German, Scandinavian, Polish, and Russian variation of Stephen
    • Description:

      An elegant, continental name for the post-Steve era. It debuted on the US Top 1000 in 1949 and has been on the list every year since except for a year off in 2008.
  15. VladimirHeart
    • Origin:

      Slavic
    • Meaning:

      "great ruler, peaceful ruler, ruler of the world"
    • Description:

      Vladimir is a cultured and deep-rooted Slavic name associated in this country with cultural figures including piano virtuoso Vladimir Horowitz and the author of Lolita, Vladimir Nabokov.
  16. JuanHeart
    • Origin:

      Spanish and Manx variation of John
    • Meaning:

      "the Lord is gracious"
    • Description:

      Juan, the Spanish version of John, is ubiquitous in the Spanish-speaking world, and is familiar internationally via such references as Don Juan and San Juan.
  17. FelipeHeart
    • Origin:

      Spanish variation of Philip
    • Description:

      A royal name in Spain that could make a lively alternative to our Philip/Phillip. Despite its status as an international version of a English name, it has ranked on the US Top 1000 almost every year since the beginning of the twentieth century, with 1904 the only exception.
  18. JacquesHeart
    • Origin:

      French variation of James and Jacob
    • Meaning:

      "supplanter"
    • Description:

      Classic French name that becomes pretentious when used for an American baby.
  19. BrendanHeart
    • Origin:

      Irish
    • Meaning:

      "prince"
    • Description:

      According to Irish legend, Saint Brendan the Voyager was the first European to touch American soil, and his name has been established here for decades, peaking in the late 1990s. It first appeared on the US charts in 1941, especially popular, not surprisingly, for Irish-American boys. It is sometimes confused with the English surname name Brandon.
  20. EmirHeart
    • Origin:

      Turkish, Bosnian, Arabic
    • Meaning:

      "prince, ruler"
    • Description:

      Emir can be a title of honor in Arabic-speaking nations. In Turkey and the Balkan countries, Emir is one of the fairly popular Arabic names for boys.