Words You Won’t Believe Have Been Turned Into Baby Names

Where will the word name trend end? Nowhere

by Pamela Redmond Satran

With word names from Genesis to Justice, Miracle to Heaven now used for thousands of children every year, we have to ask where the craze for turning words into baby names will end. The answer? Nowhere, as proven by these words-turned-names from the extended Social Security list for 2014. Here, our picks for the most outrageous words that parents are using to name their babies.


Zeppelin

What little girl or boy, or big one for that matter, wants to be named after a giant floating blimp that threatens to explode over the Earth? No one, that’s who, though 42 baby boys and 11 girls were given this name in 2014. Why? It’s a Mystery, used for seven baby girls.

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37 Responses to “Words You Won’t Believe Have Been Turned Into Baby Names”

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Words You Won’t Believe Have Been Turned Into Baby Names Part of Top Quality of Picture and Image Says:

August 13th, 2015 at 10:58 pm

[…] Nameberry – Baby Name Blog […]

rosemilk Says:

August 14th, 2015 at 3:59 am

I actually kind of like Zeppelin and Halo. But Eliminate? There are no excuses for that!

maggiemary Says:

August 14th, 2015 at 4:56 am

Halo is OK, and I quite like Zeppelin, as the nickname Zepp is quite cool. I wonder how many babies named Zeppelin are named as such because of the band, Led Zeppelin, as the parents are fans? I bet there are some!

Eliminate is awful. It doesn’t even sound nice, so there is no justification for it.

GoodHope Says:

August 14th, 2015 at 6:45 am

Gamble reminds me of one of my high school classmates who named her son Chance…because she took a chance with birth control and lost. It made me sad.

Actually, most of the “names” listed here make me sad.

amberdaydream Says:

August 14th, 2015 at 7:24 am

Jihad means “struggle, survival” in Arabic, and in Arabic speaking countries it isn’t considered a religiously charged name at all. It doesn’t have a bad meaning, just negative connotations in the Western world.

Gondolin Says:

August 14th, 2015 at 8:18 am

Jihad means “to strive, to struggle, to persevere”.

chi1127 Says:

August 14th, 2015 at 8:27 am

Interesting. While I wouldn’t use these words as names, I can see the appeal. Most of them have a nice sound to them regardless of meaning.

Theodora_Phoenix Says:

August 14th, 2015 at 9:09 am

I thought Halo was unique, and that I came up with it. Now I feel robbed! I’m suing!
Just kidding, just kidding!
Eliminate and Harsh are… Terrible!

vintageluvs Says:

August 14th, 2015 at 9:21 am

There could also be different reasons for naming your kids these “names”. Gamble can be a surname, so if someone wanted to honor a relative with this surname, they could give it to their child (ever heard of Proctor & Gamble?). Kindle is also a verb, meaning obviously “light or set fire”. It could be a take on the “light” trend, with names like Lucy, or the fire names. And I third the objection to Jihad. It is no different from naming your child a virtue name or Christian meaning names, like Hosanna or Hallelujah or even Crusade. Jihad is not a bad name, it just has a negative connotation in the West.

Bobcat108 Says:

August 14th, 2015 at 12:58 pm

These “names” make the somewhat-to-very-unusual word names proposed by a physicist in a recent thread sound eminently normal.

Here Are Some of the Craziest Words People Are Using as Baby Names Says:

August 14th, 2015 at 1:15 pm

[…] word names have been around for a while (think Rose, Grace or Faith), but as Nameberry points out, it seems the craze started to get a bit out of hand in 2014. Here’s a look at some of the […]

Here Are Some of the Craziest Words People Are Using as Baby Names | News Desk 24 Says:

August 14th, 2015 at 1:20 pm

[…] word names have been around for a while (think Rose, Grace or Faith), but as Nameberry points out, it seems the craze started to get a bit out of hand in 2014. Here’s a look at some of the […]

Here are the weirdest words young humans are actually being named Says:

August 14th, 2015 at 2:55 pm

[…] Nameberry, a baby name website, put together a list from the extended Social Security list for 2014 of the absolutely craziest words people have chosen to name their child. And some of them are pretty crazy. . . check it out: […]

catherine_abai Says:

August 14th, 2015 at 4:27 pm

I actually know a girl named Remedy in her teens. Her last name is Rule, too, so…Remedy Rule. Lol

lesliemarion Says:

August 14th, 2015 at 6:24 pm

I love word names, but not these. A name can be unusual and not to everyone’s taste, but it shouldn’t be a joke.

OliviaSarah Says:

August 14th, 2015 at 7:22 pm

Zeppelin seems to obviously be following the name-your-kid-after-your-favourite-70s-muscian? Very obvious in fact!

Simmer Starters – August 15, 2015 – The Simmering Mind Says:

August 15th, 2015 at 9:38 am

[…] Words You Won’t Believe Have Been Turned Into Baby Names (Nameberry) – I just found this amusing.  Apparently eight little boys born last year were named “Awesome”… […]

Alsace Says:

August 15th, 2015 at 1:14 pm

I work with a woman in her 40s named Kindle. I feel kind of bad for her. She spent most of her life with an unusual but not weird name and all of the sudden people can’t hear it without thinking of the gadget. Bummer.

arabella77 Says:

August 15th, 2015 at 5:56 pm

Maybe it’s just me, but I actually think Southern isn

Daisychain Says:

August 15th, 2015 at 6:20 pm

Nameberry continues to be ignorant of non-Euro-American names. Harsh is a common Indian name for boys. It’s not the same as the word harsh in English. It’s of Sanskrit derivation and means joy. For crying out loud, people.

WaltzingMoreThanMatilda Says:

August 16th, 2015 at 4:34 am

Zeppelin is surely after Led Zeppelin. I assumed Remedy was an anglicised form of the Spanish name Remedios.

charlotteblu Says:

August 16th, 2015 at 12:49 pm

I agree with what other commenters said about Jihad and Harsh. They are legitimate, harmless names. Nameberry, your xenophobia is showing.

b103.9 – Here Are Some of the Craziest Words People Are Using as Baby Names Says:

August 17th, 2015 at 6:13 am

[…] word names have been around for a while (think Rose, Grace or Faith), but as Nameberry points out, it seems the craze started to get a bit out of hand in 2014. Here’s a look at some of the most […]

inmylife Says:

August 17th, 2015 at 8:18 pm

I actually kind of love Remedy 🙂 I think the meaning is sweet, and the sound is lovely.

10 crazy words people are naming their babies | Atlanta Metro Bugle Says:

August 18th, 2015 at 11:27 am

[…] The “word name” trend of parents forgoing trusty names of old like Lauren and Michael for more unique words like “afternoon” and “arrow,” may be getting out of control, according to baby-naming website, Nameberry. […]

A Galaxy of the Unusual | The Art of Literary Nomenclature Says:

August 19th, 2015 at 7:53 pm

[…] “Words You Won’t Believe Have Been Turned Into Baby Names“ […]

13 Super Untraditional Baby Names That Have Roots in Words | Viral Media Life Says:

August 22nd, 2015 at 1:20 pm

[…] This post was originally published on Nameberry by Pamela Redmond Satran. […]

All the awesome words people are naming their babies Says:

August 24th, 2015 at 9:54 am

[…] Earlier this month, Nameberry, a parenting site boasting a large database of unique child names, released a list of quirkiest baby names taken from the 2014 Social Security census. So if you’re expecting soon and you’re […]

All the awesome words people are now naming their babies – How to do everything! Says:

August 24th, 2015 at 10:49 am

[…] Earlier this month, Nameberry, a parenting site boasting a large database of unique child names, released a list of quirkiest baby names taken from the 2014 Social Security census. So if you’re expecting soon and you’re […]

elifsu Says:

August 24th, 2015 at 11:22 am

Alias and Halo are okay.
Halo is Hale in Turkish and that name is also used.

What I Learned in August {2015} | KendraNicole.net Says:

August 27th, 2015 at 7:06 am

[…] status as a baby name enthusiast is well documented around here, and I enjoyed reading about some of last year’s more unusual name choices: in 2014, eight boys were given the name Awesome, nine were named Chaos, and five boys were […]

eveyalecia Says:

August 27th, 2015 at 12:16 pm

Some of these have obvious inspiration.

Alias could be a respelling of Elias (and therefore pronounced Uh-lie-us rather than Ay-lee-us).

Styles/Stylez probably comes from 1 Direction’s Harry Styles.

Savvy is a common nickname for Savannah, and nickname given names are on trend atm.

Shanty could be a respelling of the Hindi word name Shanti, meaning “peace, tranquility.”

Finally, I have to agree with other commenters about the names Jihad and Harsh. While I can see how Jihad might not be the best choice in America currently, you have to keep in mind the cultural history and significance. And you said yourselves that Harsh is a Sanskrit name! Why include it on this list then?

Yes, that's my baby's name! | momooze Says:

October 10th, 2015 at 2:23 am

[…] unique words like “afternoon” and “arrow,” may be getting out of control, according to baby-naming website, Nameberry. Nameberry compiled a list of some of the most out-there names from the 2014 extended Social […]

Top Baby Names of The Year That Are Random Words « WWMX-FM Says:

December 30th, 2015 at 8:31 am

[…] website Nameberry.com analyzed data from the Social Security Administration to find a bunch of “real word […]

Most Awkward Baby Names of 2015 Says:

January 12th, 2016 at 11:07 am

[…] want to stay away from some of 2015’s more awkward names.Plus, we would not want to end up on Nameberry’s list of real words that actually became baby names. 2015 brought some interesting […]

Haids1987 Says:

March 24th, 2016 at 11:25 am

Halo isn’t bad, if Heaven and Nevaeh work (gag), as well as Angel, Halo is just as wearable. And to me, Zeppelin is just parents being rock fans, and nobody in that child’s future age group would have a negative association with it.

Eliminate and Remedy are awful. Alias is pretty terrible too. Harsh sounds pretty bad also, but per reading these comments it looks like it’s a pretty common Indian name, so I’ll back off. Are parents just opening the dictionary and choosing words now? I’m all for a well thought-out word name that has meaning, but ugh. Eliminate. It just sounds trashy and ill-planned.

Liamy Says:

July 19th, 2017 at 12:50 pm

Shiny is a fairly common name in India. I have been treated by several doctors and nurses in the UK whose first name is Shiny.

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