Category: Name Problems and Disputes

How to Hide a Problematic Name

By Katherine Morna Towne, sanctanomina.net

Though I’m sure most of us would agree that one of the most satisfying parts of choosing a name for a baby is sharing our naming brilliance with the world, what happens if you actually want to hide the name you chose?

Sounds crazy, right?

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a Name Sage post by: Abby View all Name Sage posts

Update: Cora’s brother has a name!

They gave their first two daughters traditional, feminine A names. Should they stick with that style – and letter! – or try something new if their next baby is a girl?

Holly writes:

My husband and I are happily expecting our third (and last) child in October of this year. We have two girls, Amelia (Mia) Noelle and Alexandra (Lexi) Seeley. While we don’t know the gender of this little one, I have a strong inclination that we will have three girls in our future.

If we do have a boy, we’re all set. We’ve had our boy name picked out for nearly a decade.

Girl names however, turn into a word association game. I’m not convinced we need to go with another name that starts with A, though my husband seems to think that this little one will be left out if we don’t. I can’t find any that I absolutely adore; like yes, but not enough to say “That’s the name!”

We have Aurora, Anastacia & Audrey. Other names we’ve discussed are McKenna (DH likes McKenzie which I don’t), Julianna, Teagan, Tarryn, Lochlyn, Grey (a variation on our chosen boy name), Oriana (DH says it reminds him of Oreos), and Leigha/Leighton.

I know our girl names both start & end with A’s as well as they are princess/royal names. Middle names always come from somewhere in the family.

Please help! I feel like this little one will be nameless forever.

The Name Sage replies:

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a Name Sage post by: Abby View all Name Sage posts

What to do when your last name rules out nearly every first name you love? An Australian reader turns to the Name Sage to solve the puzzle of a not-too-religious boys’ name that works with Lo.

Ping writes:

I’ve been reading your Name Sage posts keenly, hoping one might help us out. But our problem feels unique, and I’m getting genuinely worried, so I’m plucking up the courage to write in with our dilemma.

We’re pregnant with our third – and final – child, whose sex we’ve decided not to find out. We like the surprise!

We currently have two boys, named Archie and Jesse.

The kicker is, their surname is Lo. Turns out, it’s the HARDEST name to work with! Here’s why:

– Any names starting with B, F, G, or S would sound out as blow, flow, glow and slow!

– Names ending in ‘s’ or ‘x’ also roll into Lo awkwardly, making the sound ‘slow’.

– Names ending in vowels, especially if they contain ‘L’ in them, sound too sing-song.

So many of our favorite names fail these basic tests: Sasha, Leo, Louis, Seb, Benjamin. The only possibilities we have in mind are Roland – but is Rolly Lo too much? – and Reuben.

We have a few girls’ names in mind, but are stuck for boys’ names. Please help!

The Name Sage replies:

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a Name Sage post by: Abby View all Name Sage posts

They’ve already used their favorite name – for the dog! She’s working on finding some fresh ideas, but he’s still stuck on Olivia. What might satisfy them both?

Megan writes:

My husband and I are expecting our first baby in early August – a girl!

We are trying to decide on the perfect name. My husband has fallen in love with Olivia.

The problem? We already used the perfect name. For our dog, Olivia.

We are a cross-cultural couple, so we hope to choose an English first name and a Turkish middle. I like (and my husband tolerates) Lyla, Linden, Marlow, and Sienna.

For Turkish names, we are considering Azize (pronounced A-zi-zay), Kaya, Mina (Meena), and Lale (la-lay).

My top name is either Lyla Azize, or maybe Linden. My husband prefers Olivia Lale.

Could you please give us some suggestions for this baby so she doesn’t end up being named after the dog?

The Name Sage replies:

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Changing Baby’s Name

By Abby Sandel

Australian blogger Sophie Cachia made headlines last week when she announced a name change for her new daughter.

Sophie – who blogs at The Young Mummy – welcomed daughter Betty, a little sister for Bobby, on January 14th. Two weeks later, Sophie and her husband announced that they’d made a mistake. Betty is now Florence, Flossy for short.

Many parents experience occasional frustration with their child’s name. Maybe it’s that Evelyn is far more popular than they realized, or because Grayson is sometimes spelled Greyson instead.

That’s not name regret. There’s a difference between these relatively minor annoyances, and the unshakable feeling that you’ve given your child the wrong name.

It sounds like Sophie quickly realized that another name from her original shortlist would suit her new daughter better. When that’s the case, a name change – especially for a newborn – is usually pretty straightforward.

Other families report starting their name search anew when their child is a few weeks or months old. If there’s pressure to choose a name before your baby arrives, that’s nothing compared to the challenges of choosing a name for a three-month old, as family and friends continue to use the name that you’re working so hard to replace.

Here are nine tips for changing your child’s name:

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