Category: Historic Names

By Linda Rosenkrantz

In 1789, when George Washington was unanimously elected the first president of the nation—the first elected president in the world– there was a lot of discussion about what he should be called. John Adams and others favored royal titles such as Your Highness and Your Majesty, even His Exalted Highness. Washington himself was said to be relieved when the humbler President was settled on.

How astonished would George be today if he could flash forward and see all the American babies being given those very exalted regal titles he rejected? This trend is not limited to pop royalty either: numerous titles from the British peerage and other international kingdoms, as well as words related to them, are being bestowed by all parents on their little heirs. Some of these royal baby names are already in the Top 1000–let’s take a look at those first.

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By Josh Murray

As the newest film in the DC Comics Cinematic Universe, Wonder Woman has recently been released to mass acclaim. Critics and fans have become enthralled by the strong female lead. Here are the names of other strong and independent women, some with those qualities embedded in their meaning, which have solid potential for your own little wonder girl.

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Vintage Girls’ Names and Nicknames

vintage girls' names

by Pamela Redmond

Vintage baby names have been back for a while now, but some vintage names are still waiting quietly for their new turn in the spotlight.

These pairs of vintage girls’ names and their old school nicknames are drawn from the list of popular baby names in 1880, the first year the US kept baby name records.

Nickname-names, usually ending in -ie for girls, were often used all by themselves, with Minnie, Annie, and Nellie all in the Top 20.

But there were also lots of companion names, proper laced-up girls’ names with adorable nickname options. In the list that follows, sometimes it’s the proper name that’s more unusual — Adelia is way more distinctive than Addie, for example — and sometimes it’s the nickname, as in Mellie as a short form of Amelia or Jettie for Juliet. And sometimes — Araminta and Mintie, for instance — it’s both.

Whatever your choice, this is a perfect way to get two names in one: formal and playful, vintage and fresh, unusual and familiar.

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What’s Your Favorite Name Era?

By Linda Rosenkrantz

Most of us name lovers, even those who are fans of new, cutting-edge monikers, also have an affinity for names of the past. But which part of the past? There are so many possibilities!

Ancient names like Cassius?

Medievals like Isolde?

Puritan names like Prudence?

Frilly Victorian Valentine names ?

Gay 90s nicknames such as Millie and Minnie and Archie?

The Downton Abbey World War I era of Violets and Ediths and Coras?

Midcentury/Mad-Men-type faves–Roger, Sally, Peggy?

The more recent past when names like Amy and Amanda, Jason and Joshua ruled?

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The Great-Grandparents Baby Name Rule

By Nancy Man

A baby name becomes trendy for one generation. For the next two generations, while those initial babies are parent-aged and grandparent-aged, you can expect the name to go out of style. But during the third generation, once the cohort reaches great-grandparent age, the name is free to come back into fashion.

Evelyn is a name with a usage pattern that fits this description well.

I’ve seen it described elsewhere as the 100-Year Rule, but I prefer to call it the Great-Grandparent Rule, as it makes more sense to me to frame it in terms of generations.

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