Category: Historic Names

Vintage Girls’ Names and Nicknames

vintage girls' names

by Pamela Redmond

Vintage baby names have been back for a while now, but some vintage names are still waiting quietly for their new turn in the spotlight.

These pairs of vintage girls’ names and their old school nicknames are drawn from the list of popular baby names in 1880, the first year the US kept baby name records.

Nickname-names, usually ending in -ie for girls, were often used all by themselves, with Minnie, Annie, and Nellie all in the Top 20.

But there were also lots of companion names, proper laced-up girls’ names with adorable nickname options. In the list that follows, sometimes it’s the proper name that’s more unusual — Adelia is way more distinctive than Addie, for example — and sometimes it’s the nickname, as in Mellie as a short form of Amelia or Jettie for Juliet. And sometimes — Araminta and Mintie, for instance — it’s both.

Whatever your choice, this is a perfect way to get two names in one: formal and playful, vintage and fresh, unusual and familiar.

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What’s Your Favorite Name Era?

By Linda Rosenkrantz

Most of us name lovers, even those who are fans of new, cutting-edge monikers, also have an affinity for names of the past. But which part of the past? There are so many possibilities!

Ancient names like Cassius?

Medievals like Isolde?

Puritan names like Prudence?

Frilly Victorian Valentine names ?

Gay 90s nicknames such as Millie and Minnie and Archie?

The Downton Abbey World War I era of Violets and Ediths and Coras?

Midcentury/Mad-Men-type faves–Roger, Sally, Peggy?

The more recent past when names like Amy and Amanda, Jason and Joshua ruled?

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The Great-Grandparents Baby Name Rule

By Nancy Man

A baby name becomes trendy for one generation. For the next two generations, while those initial babies are parent-aged and grandparent-aged, you can expect the name to go out of style. But during the third generation, once the cohort reaches great-grandparent age, the name is free to come back into fashion.

Evelyn is a name with a usage pattern that fits this description well.

I’ve seen it described elsewhere as the 100-Year Rule, but I prefer to call it the Great-Grandparent Rule, as it makes more sense to me to frame it in terms of generations.

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44 Names from 1917 You Should Use Now!

By Linda Rosenkrantz

In the baby-name world there’s something called the 100-Year-Rule, the theory that it takes a century for names to be ready to make a comeback. That timeframe has shrunk considerably, with the resurgence of names from the fifties, sixties and even later, that is happening right now.

But every year we do like to look back at the names from a century ago, to dig for Top 500 examples that haven’t made it back to the current Top 1000 (actually two years short since we’re still looking at 2015) , but have the potential to do so. And for good measure, we’ll add the names that are in that same position now.

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posted by: Nick View all posts by this author

By Nick Turner

Given the tech industry’s burgeoning role in the global economy, many parents are eager to get their kids ready for information-era jobs at a young age.

So why not start at the very beginning and give your child a tech-inspired name at birth? Lots of parents are doing just that and christening their kids with monikers associated with inventors and tech luminaries.

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