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Girl Names Ending in T

The most popular girls' name ending in T is Scarlett, thanks more to actress Scarlett Johansson than to Gone With the Wind.

Along with Scarlett, other girl names ending with T in the US Top 1000 include Violet, Juliet, Margaret, Margot, Elliott, and Bridget.

Then of course there are those names that don't technically end with T but with the T sound: Charlotte, Juliette, Celeste, Kate.

Unique T ending names for girls that we recommend include Britt, Dot, Frost, Harriet, Kit, Millicent, Scout, and Witt.

A T ending works well if your surname starts with a vowel or with a consonant that sounds distinctly different from T, such as K or S. T endings are more difficult with last names that start with D or T.

Here are all our girls' names ending with the letter T. The top names below rank among the current US Top 1000 Baby Names and are ordered by popularity. Unique names rank below the Top 1000 and are listed alphabetically.

VioletHeart

  • Origin:

    English from Latin
  • Meaning:

    "purple"
  • Description:

    Violet is soft and sweet but far from shrinking. The Victorian Violet, one of the prettiest of the color and flower names, was chosen by high-profile parents Jennifer Garner and Ben Affleck, definitely a factor in its rapid climb to popularity. Violet cracked into the Top 50 for the first time ever in 2015.

MargotHeart

  • Origin:

    French, diminutive of Margaret
  • Meaning:

    "pearl"
  • Description:

    Margot originated as a French pet form of Marguerite, a name that ultimately derived from the Greek margarites, meaning "pearl." Other spellings include Margo and Margaux. Margaux Hemingway was originally Margot but changed the spelling to honor the wine from the French village of Margaux that was drunk by her parents on the night she was conceived.

ScarlettHeart

  • Origin:

    English
  • Meaning:

    "scarlet, red"
  • Description:

    Scarlett originated as an occupation surname, designating a person who sold scarlet, a luxury wool cloth produced in Medieval Europe. The word is thought to derive from the Arabic siklāt, referring to silks dyed with kermes. The fanciest, favorited color was scarlet red.

JulietHeart

  • Origin:

    English from Latin
  • Meaning:

    "youthful or sky father"
  • Description:

    One of the most romantic names, the lovely and stylish Juliet seems finally to have shaken off her limiting link to Romeo. In Shakespeare's play, it was Juliet who said "What's in a name?"

MargaretHeart

  • Origin:

    Greek
  • Meaning:

    "pearl"
  • Description:

    Margaret is derived from the French Marguerite, which in turn came from Margarita, the Latin form of the Greek Margarites. Margarites was based on the Old Persian word margārīta, meaning "pearl."

HarrietHeart

  • Origin:

    English variation of French Henriette
  • Meaning:

    "estate ruler"
  • Description:

    Harriet has long been considered a stylish, upscale name in England, but it's still waiting to be revived in the US—though some parents seeking a solid, serious semi-classic are beginning to consider it.

ScoutHeart

  • Origin:

    Word name
  • Description:

    Scout, a character nickname from To Kill a Mockingbird (her real name was Jean Louise), became a real-life possibility when Bruce Willis and Demi Moore used it for their now grown middle daughter, followed by Tom Berenger a few years later. A unisex choice that is growing in popularity for both genders -- but given to girls about four times more often than to boys -- it was picked by skater Tai Babilonia for her son and Kerri Walsh for her daughter Scout Margery.

BridgetHeart

  • Origin:

    Anglicized variation of Gaelic Brighid
  • Meaning:

    "strength or exalted one"
  • Description:

    Bridget is the Anglicized form of Brigid, an Irish-Gaelic name that was derived from the word brígh, which means "strength."

AmethystHeart

  • Origin:

    Gem and Color name
  • Description:

    As flower names become more unique, so can gem names move beyond Ruby and Pearl to names like Topaz, Sapphire, and Peridot. Amethyst, the purple birthstone for February, has never been in the Top 1000, but could have some appeal, joining similarly-hued Violet and Lilac, all of which make great names for Aquarius babies or names for February babies.

KitHeart

  • Origin:

    English, diminutive of Katherine
  • Meaning:

    "pure"
  • Description:

    Kit is a crisp, old-time British-accented unisex nickname that sounds fresh and modern today. Kitty is another so-retro-it's-cool nickname.

MillicentHeart

  • Origin:

    German
  • Meaning:

    "strong in work"
  • Description:

    Combining the mild and the innocent, this sweet and feminine name is worthy of a comeback, in the mode of Madeline and Cecilia. Its original, also attractive form is Melisende, which came from Germany to France and was borne by a daughter of Charlemagne.

ElliotHeart

  • Origin:

    Anglicization of Elijah or Elias
  • Meaning:

    "Jehovah is God"
  • Description:

    Elliot is another traditional boy name used for girls", a trend led by political commentator George Stephanopoulos and his actress wife Ali Wentworth.

JanetHeart

  • Origin:

    Diminutive of Jane
  • Meaning:

    "God's gracious gift"
  • Description:

    Janet started as a pet form of Jane but has long been used independently. Jane is a feminine form of John, which derived from the Hebrew name Yochanan. Janet can also be considered a variation of Jeannette, a derivative of Joan and another feminization of the name John.

AugustHeart

  • Origin:

    Latin
  • Meaning:

    "majestic, venerable"
  • Description:

    Though associated traditionally (and fashionably) with boys, it has been used occasionally for girls as well – by Garth Brooks and by Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg, for example. But August is used significantly more often for girls these days than traditional feminine variations Augusta and Augustina, and makes for a fresh twist on traditional month names like April and May, as well as an updated spin on season name Autumn.

TempestHeart

  • Origin:

    Word name
  • Meaning:

    "turbulent, stormy"
  • Description:

    Tempest is one of those names that could go either way. Cool, evocative modern word name? Or asking for trouble? Your call, but if you decide the former image is dominant, be warned that some people will see it as the latter.

ElliottHeart

  • Origin:

    Variation of Elliot
  • Meaning:

    "Jehovah is God"
  • Description:

    While Elliott and Elliot are well-established for boys, parents are now considering both these boy names for girls, too.

LilibetHeart

  • Origin:

    Nickname of Elizabeth, Hebrew
  • Meaning:

    "pledged to God"
  • Description:

    Lilibet is the fanciful short form of Elizabeth first noted as the childhood nickname of Britain's queen and now made contemporary as the name of the newborn daughter of the Duke and Duchess of Sussex -- aka Harry and Meghan. The nickname Lilibet originally derived from Elizabeth II's first pronunciation of her own name. Lilibet also relates to the flower name Lily, and reportedly Harry and Meghan plan to call their daughter Lili. Lili makes a sweet baby sister name for Archie. Thirteen baby girls were named variation Lilibeth in the US in 2020 but fewer than five were called Lilibet. We expect that to change in the 2021 statistics.

CricketHeart

  • Origin:

    Nature name
  • Description:

    Nickname name from the era of Father Knows Best, though we can see it making something of a comeback, a la Clover and Pippa. Cricket has new potential especially since it has recently been chosen by Busy Philipps. Still, it's one of the quirkier girl names starting with C.

MonetHeart

  • Origin:

    French artist name, from diminutive of Simon
  • Description:

    A new favorite of the bohemian set, brought to light by actress Monet Mazur, daughter of the artist who designed the Rolling Stones' mouth logo.

EverettHeart

  • Origin:

    German
  • Meaning:

    "brave boar"
  • Description:

    Everett is a male name that's a prime crossover candidate, much like Eliot and Ellery. Its newfound popularity for boys stems from its similarity to trendy sisters Eva and Evelyn.