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Scandinavian Names

Scandinavian baby names are a hot group, attracting new interest from parents beyond the Scandinavian countries.
The Scandinavian names here include names with origins in all the Scandinavian countries — Sweden, Norway, and Denmark, but not Finland.

If you want more names from one of the individual Scandinavian countries, check out our master lists of Swedish baby names, Norwegian baby names, and Danish baby names.

Here, our master list of Scandinavian baby names.The top names below rank among the current US Top 1000 Baby Names and are ordered by popularity.Unique names rank below the Top 1000 and are listed alphabetically.
See Unique Scandinavian Names

Top Scandinavian Names

  • Mia

    Mia originated as a short form of Maria, which ultimately derived from the Hebrew name Miryam. In modern times, Mia has been used as a nickname for names including Amelia, Emilia, and Miriam. Mia... Read More 

  • Axel

    A classic in its native Scandinavia, Axel has a cool rock 'n' roll flavor in the US, thanks to Guns N' Roses' Axl Rose (born William). Axel is a popular Scandinavian form of the Biblical Absalom,... Read More 

  • Andrea

    Andrea -- a feminine form of Andrew (and a male name in several European cultures)-- comes with a good selection of pronunciations-- ANN-dree-a, AHN-dree-a, or ahn-DRAY-a--each with a slightly... Read More 

  • Gunner

    The kind of nouveau macho name favored by NRA-leaning parents. Killers' frontman Brandon Flowers gave it to his son in 2009. Gunnar is another spelling that makes the name a bit less militaristic. Read More 

  • Kaia

    The new Maia, the next Kayla, Kaia has been on the charts since the year 2000. You might see it as a female form of the also-rising Kai, which means sea in Hawaiian and is sometimes used for girls... Read More 

  • Anderson

    Anderson shot up quite a bit on the popular names list in the 2000's, no doubt in large part due to the prominence of white-haired cable newsman... Read More 

  • Dahlia

    One of the flower names, used occasionally in Britain (where it's pronounced DAY-lee-a). It seems to have recovered from what was perceived as a slightly affected la-di-dah air. The flower was... Read More 

  • Erik

    Gives a slightly updated feel to the stale Eric.Read More 

  • Emanuel

    Fewer letters does not always mean easier—the traditional spelling is the one most people will recognize.Read More 

  • Gunnar

    A key figure in Norse legend and a traditional Scandinavian favorite making inroads here.Read More