unisex names

  1. Adair
    • Origin:

      Scottish and Irish
    • Meaning:

      "oak tree ford"
    • Description:

      Adair has flair, the grace of a Fred Astaire. It's a Scottish surname which came from the first name Edgar.
  2. Addison
    • Origin:

      English
    • Meaning:

      "son of Adam"
    • Description:

      Despite its origin as a patronymic meaning "son of Adam", Addison really caught on for baby girls in the US around the turn of the millennium, following in Madison's footsteps to peak at #11 in 2007 and again in 2010.
  3. Adrian
    • Origin:

      Latin
    • Meaning:

      "man of Adria"
    • Description:

      Adrian is one of those names that’s easy to picture on all kinds of people. From an active and energetic five-year-old to your great grandpa, from the coolest, breeziest guy you know, to the quiet, serious one, it’s no wonder Adrian has always made the US Top 500 since the early 20th century.
  4. Aeron
    • Origin:

      Welsh
    • Description:

      Tolkien may have been inspired by this unisex name of a Celtic goddess of war. Welsh poet Dylan Thomas named his daughter the variation Aeronwy. With goddess names so hot for baby girls, this ethereal choice is one to consider.
  5. Ainsley
    • Origin:

      Scottish
    • Meaning:

      "solitary meadow"
    • Description:

      This name will tick a lot of boxes for many parents: unisex; trendy sound; pretty instinctive to pronounce; and some great namesakes including British chef Ainsley Harriott and American footballer Ainsley Battles.
  6. Akira
    • Origin:

      Japanese
    • Meaning:

      "bright, intelligent"
    • Description:

      Akira is a popular Japanese name for both sexes that's migrated to the West because of its appearance in manga and video games. Akiro is a related name popular for boys.
  7. Alexis
    • Origin:

      Greek
    • Meaning:

      "defender"
    • Description:

      This name leapt into the female column via vixen Alexis Carrington on 'Dynasty" in the 1980s. It's more popular for girls, but it's still a widely used boys' names and is one of the most popular unisex names in the US today.
  8. Ambrose
    • Origin:

      Latin
    • Meaning:

      "immortal"
    • Description:

      Gentle but grandiose and beloved by British novelists including Evelyn Waugh and P. G. Wodehouse, Ambrose was a fast rising name in 2022. Entering the UK Top 1000 for the first time and proving popular among Nameberry users, its elegance, softness, and vintage style means it fits in with popular Theodore, Sebastian, and Jeremiah.
  9. ARAN
    • Artemis
      • Origin:

        Greek
      • Meaning:

        "butcher"
      • Description:

        Although it could well sound masculine, Artemis was actually the Greek goddess of the moon, the equivalent of the Roman Diana. Also spelled Artemas and Artemus, this name has a mythological, historical, Three Musketeer-ish ring.
    • Artemus
      • Origin:

        Greek
      • Meaning:

        "gift of Artemis"
      • Description:

        Variant of Artemas
    • Asher
      • Origin:

        Hebrew
      • Meaning:

        "fortunate, blessed, happy one"
      • Description:

        Asher—an excellent, soft and sensitive Old Testament choice—is a baby boy name on the rise, and is a Nameberry biblical favorite.
    • Ashley
      • Origin:

        English
      • Meaning:

        "dweller near the ash tree meadow"
      • Description:

        It may have peaked at #1 for girls in 1991 and 1992 in the US, but Ashley actually has a long history as a male given name, as evidenced by the sensitive Ashley Wilkes in Gone With the Wind. It's always been more popular for boys in England and Wales, where it currently ranks at #414.
    • Ashton
      • Origin:

        English
      • Meaning:

        "ash trees place"
      • Description:

        The recent ascent of this English surname is due to two things: the megapopular Ash beginning and TV/movie hottie Ashton Kutcher. The name peaked at Number 76 in 2004, a year after Ashton Kutcher's (both Christopher Ashton) hit TV show Punk'd made its debut.
    • Aspen
      • Origin:

        Nature and place-name
      • Description:

        As trendy as the chic Colorado ski resort and film festival, Aspen is fast becoming more popular for girls than for boys, but this nature name would work equally well for either.
    • Aster
      • Origin:

        English; Amharic
      • Meaning:

        "star"
      • Description:

        This is a fresh new addition to the botanical list; comedian Gilbert Gottfried made it a real bouquet when he named his daughter Lily Aster. And the name of the little girl on television's Dexter sounds like Aster, but is actually spelled Astor, which brings it more high society name. Aster relates to the Greek word for star. In Ethiopia, Aster is pronounced "ah-STAIR", and is the Amharic variation of Biblical Esther.
    • Aubrey
      • Origin:

        English from French
      • Meaning:

        "elf ruler"
      • Description:

        Once a popular choice in for boys in the Middle Ages and again during the 19th century, Aubrey has mostly been used for girls in the US since the 1970's. With its arty, surname-y, and sophisticated feel, however, it is rising up the UK charts for both boys and girls.
    • August
      • Origin:

        German form of Latin Augustus
      • Meaning:

        "great, magnificent"
      • Description:

        The name August is at its highest point since the 1890s, when it ranked among the Top 100 boy names in the US. And deservedly so, given its great meaning, historic roots, and cool nicknames.
    • Autumn
      • Origin:

        Season name
      • Description:

        Crisp and colorful, Autumn is the most popular season name now -- the only one in the Top 100 in recent years -- with Autumn's coolness only surpassed by Winter. Jennifer Love Hewitt named her daughter Autumn James.
    • Avery
      • Origin:

        English
      • Meaning:

        "ruler of the elves"
      • Description:

        Avery is a unisex name that is used four times as often today for girls as for boys. But while Avery's popularity is starting to soften for girls, it continues to get stronger for boys -- in keeping with our finding that gender neutral names are becoming more favored for boys than for girls.