Popular in Austria

  1. Alina
    • Origin:

      Slavic
    • Meaning:

      "bright, beautiful"
    • Description:

      Alina has been drifting up the US popularity charts since the early 1980s, now nearing the Top 100. But Alina's real strength is in its international flexibility: The name ranks highly in a wide range of European, English speaking, and Latin American countries.
  2. Anton
    • Origin:

      German, Russian, and Scandinavian variation of Anthony
    • Description:

      Cultured and cultivated in an old-style, Old World way. Sometimes associated with the classic writer Anton Chekhov. Al Pacino has a son with this name.
  3. Antonia
    • Origin:

      Latin
    • Meaning:

      "from Antium"
    • Description:

      Antonia is stronger than most feminized boys’ names, reflecting the pioneer spirit of Willa Cather's classic novel My Antonia. Antonia is hovering near the bottom of the US popularity list, which may be an excellent reason for you to use it.
  4. Aurelia
    • Origin:

      Latin
    • Meaning:

      "the golden one"
    • Description:

      Aurelia is an ancient Roman name that's become a surprise hit in the contemporary world. A top favorite on Nameberry, it reentered the US Top 1000 in 2014 after a 70-year absence and continues to climb.
  5. Emilio
    • Origin:

      Spanish and Italian variation of Emil
    • Meaning:

      "rival"
    • Description:

      Dashing and suave, with a hint of poetry and gentleness, Emilio is an appealing and international choice. A solid favorite in Italy, it is also on the rise in the US, France, Austria, and the UK.
  6. Fabian
    • Origin:

      Latin clan name
    • Meaning:

      "bean grower"
    • Description:

      Fabian is the ancient name of a saint and pope that also has Shakespearean cred as Olivia's servant in Twelfth Night and more recently made an appearance in Harry Potter. In the U.S. Fabian became best known via the 1960s teen idol/singer who went solely by his first name.
  7. Finn
    • Origin:

      Irish
    • Meaning:

      "fair or white"
    • Description:

      Finn is a name with enormous energy and charm, that of the greatest hero of Irish mythology, Finn MacCool (aka Fionn mac Cuumhaill), an intrepid warrior with mystical supernatural powers, noted as well for his wisdom and generosity.
  8. Ida
    • Origin:

      German
    • Meaning:

      "industrious one"
    • Description:

      Many vowel names stylish a century ago are coming back, and Ida seems like a possible, logical successor to Ada and Ava.
  9. Isabella
    • Origin:

      Spanish and Italian variation of Elizabeth, Hebrew
    • Meaning:

      "pledged to God"
    • Description:

      Isabella has been a Top 10 name for girls in the US for two decades now. The Latinate form of Isabel, a variation of Elizabeth which originally derived from the Hebrew name Elisheba, Isabella reigned as Number 1 in 2009 and 2010.
  10. Jonas
    • Origin:

      Greek variation of Jonah
    • Meaning:

      "dove"
    • Description:

      Jonas has a slightly more grandfatherly image than the English version of his name, but that only adds to its retro appeal. And though it may lag behind Jonah in this country, Jonas is riding a huge wave of popularity in Europe, where it ranks highly in Germany, Switzerland, Austria and Norway.
  11. Josef
    • Origin:

      German, Scandinavian, Czech variation of Joseph
    • Meaning:

      "Jehovah increases"
    • Description:

      The German, Scandinavian and Czech variant of Joseph, borne by several notable European artists and athletes, as well as the brutal Soviet dictator Josef (or Iosif) Stalin.
  12. Konstantin
    • Leonie
      • Origin:

        Latin
      • Meaning:

        "lion"
      • Description:

        Leonie is a chic French and German form of a name that exists in a range of variations from Leona to Leonia to Leon to Leo to Lionel, all newly fashionable after a couple of generations in style limbo.
    • Levi
      • Origin:

        Hebrew
      • Meaning:

        "joined, attached"
      • Description:

        Levi, lighter and more energetic than most biblical names, with its up vowel ending, combines Old Testament gravitas with the casual flair associated with Levi Strauss jeans.
    • Lia
      • Origin:

        Diminutive of names ending in -lia or Italian variation of Leah
      • Meaning:

        "weary"
      • Description:

        Used throughout Europe and in Hawaii, Lia sounds just like its mother name Leah, but looks particularly pretty on paper. Sleek and simple, Lia is an internationally flexible choice that might also be short for such names as Amelia or Dahlia.
    • Lina
      • Origin:

        Arabic; Latin diminutive
      • Meaning:

        "tender"
      • Description:

        This pretty, succinct Arabic name is also commonly used as a nickname for names like Carolina.
    • Lorenz
      • Luka
        • Origin:

          Spelling variation of Luca
        • Description:

          Luka is one of the coolest names in recent years, following suit of its cousin Luca which is now a Top 50 name. Luka is on its way up the charts and may crack the Top 100 in the very near future. Luka has a lot going for it — it is following the tails of Lucas and Luke which have been enjoying significant popularity for years. It also boasts the very current "-ah" ending sound that feels fresher than ever for boy names, from Noah to Ezra to Judah. The "k" in the middle gives an extra edge as well.
      • Magdalena
        • Origin:

          Greek
        • Meaning:

          "from Magdala"
        • Description:

          Magdalena is a pretty name forever associated with the fallen-yet-redeemed Mary Magdalen; often heard in the Hispanic community. But forward thinking parents are reviving Magdalena along with Magdalene and the unrelated but similar-sounding Marguerite.
      • Marlene
        • Origin:

          German variation of Madeline; combination of Mary and Magdalen
        • Description:

          Marlene Dietrich made it famous when she condensed her first two names, Maria and Magdalena. Now more often pronounced with two syllables rather than three.