Only 12 Babies in 2020 England and Wales

  1. Allison
    • Origin:

      Scottish, diminutive of Alice
    • Meaning:

      "noble"
    • Description:

      Widely used here since the fifties, Allison -- a derivative of Alice -- has now been once again surpassed by the original Alice as parents embrace vintage revivals. Despite this, Allison's popularity has slipped only slightly.
  2. August
    • Origin:

      Latin
    • Meaning:

      "majestic, venerable"
    • Description:

      Though associated traditionally (and fashionably) with boys, it has been used occasionally for girls as well – by Garth Brooks, Nicolas Cage, and Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg, for example. But August is used significantly more often for girls these days than traditional feminine variations Augusta and Augustina, and makes for a fresh twist on traditional month names like April and May, as well as an updated spin on season name Autumn.
  3. Amelia-May
    • Annie-May
      • Annie-Rose
        • Betsan
          • Origin:

            Welsh pet form of Elizabeth
          • Description:

            Betsan is little-known outside of the U.K. but it could provide an intriguing alternative to Liz, Beth, Betsy, Betty, and Libby.
        • Billie-Mae
          • Billie-Rose
            • Bonnie-Leigh
              • Cadence
                • Origin:

                  Latin
                • Meaning:

                  "rhythm, beat"
                • Description:

                  The musical word name Cadence, seemed to come out of nowhere to zoom up the charts; it rose over 700 spots between 2002 and 2004, and showed up in the Top 200 in 2007. It's gone down in the popular names list since then, though. Some might see it as a feminine relative of the popular Caden. Kadence and Kaydence are also rising.
              • Clemence
                • Origin:

                  French feminine variation of Clement
                • Meaning:

                  "mild, merciful"
                • Description:

                  Calm, composed, and chic.
              • Clemency
                • Origin:

                  English feminine variation of Clement, Latin
                • Meaning:

                  "mild, merciful"
                • Description:

                  One of the rarest of virtue names, Clemency could come back along with the more familiar Puritan virtue names such as Hope and Faith. It has a rhythmic three-syllable sound, and offers a more virtuous alternative to the more popular Clementine.
              • Desiree
                • Origin:

                  French
                • Meaning:

                  "desired, wished"
                • Description:

                  One of the original French names chosen by midcentury parents for their sophistication and je ne sais quoi, Desiree has since become completely assimilated in the US. It ranked in the Top 1000 from 1954-2017, but has since dropped back out.
              • Daisy-Rae
                • Eden-Rose
                  • Elsie-Grace
                    • Joan
                      • Origin:

                        English variation of Johanna
                      • Meaning:

                        "God is gracious"
                      • Description:

                        Joan was the perfect name choice for one of the leading characters on Mad Men, being a quintessential girls' name of the period. A Top 10 name in the 30s, a Top 50 name from the 40s through the early 60s, it was the fifth most popular name in the country for three years running and ranks as one of the most common names for girls in the 20th century. But alas, Joan hasn't even appeared in the Top 1000 for a dozen years, and these days it's primarily associated with Joans of the generation of Joan Crawford, Joan Collins and Joan Rivers--just a few of the noted Joans whose ranks also include the singers Joan Sutherland, Joan Baez, Joan Armatrading and Joan Jett. But it's possible that modern parents who are reviving Jane might move on to Joan, inspired by Joan Hollaway Harris.
                    • Livie
                      • Origin:

                        Diminutive of Olivia, Latin
                      • Meaning:

                        "olive tree"
                      • Description:

                        The adorable diminutive Livie is most often a short form of the popular Olivia and may also be spelled Livvy, Livvie, or Livi. But occasionally it may be short for the separate Ancient Roman name Livia or the Scandinavian Liv, both of which have different roots and meanings.
                    • Lilly-Ann
                      • Lilly-Rae