80's pop culture names

  1. Al
    • Allen
      • Origin:

        English and Scottish
      • Meaning:

        "handsome, cheerful"
      • Description:

        Allen is the spelling of this name -- other common spellings are Alan and Allan -- most associated with the surname; it might also be the most appropriate if you're trying to steer clear of Al as a nickname, as this can easily offer you Len or Lenny as options.
    • Andre
      • Origin:

        French and Portuguese variation of Andrew
      • Meaning:

        "strong and manly"
      • Description:

        Andre is one of the international forms of Andrew that has been familiar in the English-speaking world for decades without any need to be overly Anglicized - though round the world, it is more likely to be written as André.
    • Arnold
      • Origin:

        English from German
      • Meaning:

        "ruler, strong as an eagle"
      • Description:

        Strange as it may now seem, the venerable St. Arnold was a Greek by birth, a musician who became a member of the court of Charlemagne. The name is said to have been introduced into Britain by the Normans in the form Arnaud.
    • Bill
      • Origin:

        English, diminutive of William
      • Meaning:

        "resolute protection"
      • Description:

        Most Bills today are dads...or grandpas. The younger Williams are usually nicknamed Will, or called by their full names.
    • Brooke
      • Origin:

        English
      • Meaning:

        "small stream"
      • Description:

        Brooke has long projected an aura of sleek sophistication, and can also be seen as a stylish water name.
    • Bruce
      • Origin:

        Scottish and English from French
      • Meaning:

        "from the brushwood thicket"
      • Description:

        Bruce is a Norman place name made famous by the Scottish king Robert the Bruce, who won Scotland's independence from England in the fourteenth century. It's perennially popular in Scotland, but has been rarely used here for a generation -- though the impact of Bruces Lee, Springsteen, Dern and Willis, as well as Batman's Bruce Wayne -- still lingers. At one time Bruce was so widespread in Australia, it became a nickname for any Ozzie man. An interesting alternative is Brix, the Normandy place name where the Bruce family originated.
    • Cher
      • Origin:

        French
      • Meaning:

        "beloved"
      • Description:

        For years there was only one Cher, and then along came the charming heroine of the movie "Clueless." The world now officially has enough Chers in it.
    • Chuck
      • Origin:

        Diminutive of Charles
      • Description:

        So far out it's almost ready to be let back in.
    • Clint
      • Origin:

        English, diminutive of Clinton
      • Description:

        As flinty and steely as Mr. Eastwood.
    • Cyndi
      • Eddie
        • Origin:

          Diminutive of Edward et al
        • Meaning:

          "wealthy"
        • Description:

          Most parents today call their Edwards Edward -- and we tend to think that's the right call. But it's worth noting that Eddie has been in the Top 1000 every year since records began in 1880; indeed, it was a mainstay on the Top 100 through the 1950s.
      • Elvis
        • Origin:

          Meaning unknown
        • Description:

          When the King was alive, and for years afterwards, few people (except Declan McManus who became Elvis Costello) dared use his singular name, but now it's very much up for grabs.
      • George
        • Origin:

          Greek
        • Meaning:

          "farmer"
        • Description:

          Iconoclasts though we may be, we like Fred, we like Frank, and we like George, which was among the Top 10 from 1830 to 1950, when the number of little Georges started to decline. Solid, strong, royal and saintly, yet friendly and unpretentious, we think that George is in prime position for a comeback, especially since it was chosen by Britain's royal couple.
      • Harrison
        • Origin:

          English
        • Meaning:

          "son of Harry"
        • Description:

          Harrison, a name made viable by Harrison Ford, is increasingly popular with parents who want an H name that's more formal than Harry or Hank but doesn't veer into the stiff Huntington-Harrington territory.
      • Jackson
        • Origin:

          English
        • Meaning:

          "son of Jack"
        • Description:

          Jackson is one of those names that's much more popular than you think, coming in near the top of our annual Playground Analysis, which ranks names by grouping all their spellings together. There were nearly 17,000 baby boys named Jackson -- along Jaxon, Jaxson, Jaxxon, Jaxen, Jaxyn, Jaxsen, and Jaxsyn -- which counted together makes it the Number 3 boys' name.
      • Janet
        • Origin:

          Diminutive of Jane
        • Meaning:

          "God's gracious gift"
        • Description:

          Janet started as a pet form of Jane but has long been used independently. Jane is a feminine form of John, which derived from the Hebrew name Yochanan. Janet can also be considered a variation of Jeannette, a derivative of Joan and another feminization of the name John.
      • Joe
        • Origin:

          Diminutive of Joseph
        • Meaning:

          "Jehovah increases"
        • Description:

          Joe is still the ultimate good-guy name, not at all diminished by its longevity or popularity or its everyman rep as Regular Joe, Cowboy Joe, G.I. Joe, Joe Exotic, Joe Blow, Joe Millionaire, Average Joe — and now President Joe (Biden).
      • John
        • Origin:

          Hebrew
        • Meaning:

          "God is gracious"
        • Description:

          John reigned as the most popular of all boys' Christian names for 400 years, from the time the first Crusaders carried it back to Britain until the 1950s. Then American baby namers finally seemed to tire of this straight-arrow, almost anonymous John Doe of names, replacing it with fancier forms like Jonathan and the imported Sean and Ian.
      • Jordan
        • Origin:

          English from Hebrew
        • Meaning:

          "flowing down"
        • Description:

          Jordan became one of the top unisex baby names in the heyday of basketball's Michael Jordan, and is still among the most popular unisex names starting with J. The name was originally given to those baptized in holy water brought back by Crusaders from the River Jordan, the only river in Palestine, and the one in which Christ was baptized by John the Baptist.