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Authors' Surnames as First Names for Boys

These literary names shine with classic elegance due to their distinguished namesakes, however, they are also unique and distinctive because of their rare use as first names. All names are perfect for parents searching for a boy name with idiosyncrasy, historic significance, an intellectual sound, and a vintage flair. - Created by KylieLocke

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  • Alcott

    From Louisa May Alcott, an American author best known for Little Women (1868) and Little Men (1871)

  • Alger

    From Horatio Alger Jr., a 19th-century American author best known for Ragged Dick (1868), Strive and Succeed (1872), Luck and Pluck (1869), and Tattered Tom (1871)

  • Andersen

    From Hans Christian Andersen, a 19th-century Danish author known for his fairy tales, including The Little Mermaid, The Ugly Duckling (1843), and The Princess and the Pea (1835), among many others

  • Austen

    From Jane Austen, an 18th- and 19th-century English author known for Emma (1815), Sense and Sensibility (1811), Pride and Prejudice (1813), Persuasion (1817), and others

  • Beckett

    From Samuel Beckett Molloy (1951), a 20th-century Irish author known for The Unnamable (1953), Murphy (1938), and Waiting for Godot (1953), among many others

  • Bradbury

    From Ray Bradbury, a 20th-century American author best known for Fahrenheit 451 (1953), Dandelion Wine (1957), and The Martian Chronicles (1950)

  • Burnett

    From Frances Hodgson Burnett, a 19th- and 20th-century English-American author best known for The Secret Garden (1911) and Little Lord Fauntleroy (1886)

  • Bronte

    From Anne, Charlotte and Emily Brontë, three English sisters from the 19th century, each known for their classic novels, including Jane Eyre (Charlotte Brontë, 1847), Wuthering Heights (Emily Brontë, 1847), and the Tenant of Wildfowl Hall (Anne Brontë, 1848), among many others

  • Clancy

    From Tom Clancy, a 20th- and 21st-century American author known for The Hunt for Red October (1984), Rainbow Six (1998), and Clear and Present Danger (1989), among many others

  • Conrad

    From Joseph Conrad, a 19th- and 20th-century Polish-British author known for Heart of Darkness (1899), Nostromo (1904), and Victory (1915), among many others

  • Cooper

    From James Fenimore Cooper, a 19th-century American author best known for the Last of the Mohicans (1826), the Deerslayer (1841), and The Pioneers (1823)

  • Douglass

    From Frederick Douglass, a 19th-century American social reformer, abolitionist, and author known for Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (1845)

  • Doyle

    From Arthur Conan Doyle, a 19th- and 20th-century Irish-Scots author and physician, best known for creating the Sherlock Holmes series, including A Study in Scarlet (1887), The Sign of the Four (1890), The Hound of the Baskervilles (1902), and The Valley of Fear (1915)

  • Dahl

    From Roald Dahl, a 20th-century British author best known for Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (1964), Matilda (1988), The BFG (1982), and James and the Giant Peach (1961)

  • Eliot

    From George Eliot, the pen name of Mary Ann Evans (a 19th-century English author best known for Middlemarch (1971) and Adam Bede (1859)), and T. S. Eliot (a 20th-century British author known for The Waste Land (1922), Murder in the Cathedral (1935), and others

  • Faulkner

    From William Faulkner, a 20th-century American author known for The Sound and the Fury (1929), As I Lay Dying (1930), and Light in August (1932)

  • Fielding

    From Henry Fielding, a 18th-century English author best known for The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling (1749), Joseph Andrews (1942), and Amelia (1751)

  • Fitzgerald

    From F. Scott Fitzgerald, a 20th-century American author best known for The Great Gatsby (1925), This Side of Paradise (1920), and Tender Is the Night (1934)

  • Flynn

    From Gillian Flynn, a 20th- and 21st-century American author best known for Gone Girl (2012), Dark Places (2009), and Sharp Objects (2006)

  • Ford

    From Ford Madox Ford, a 19th- and 20th-century English author known for The Good Soldier (1915), the Parade’s End series (1924), and others

  • Forster

    From E. M. Forster, a 19th- and 20th-century English author known for A Passage to India (1924), Howards End (1910), A Room with a View (1908), and others

  • Follett

    From Ken Follett, a 20th- and 21st-century Welsh author known for The Pillars of the Earth (1989), Fall of Giants (2010), World Without End (2007), and Eye of the Needle (1978), among many others

  • Gibbon

    From Edward Gibbon, an 18th-century English historian and author best known for The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (1776)

  • Golding

    From William Golding, a 20th-century British author best known for Lord of the Flies (1954) and The Inheritors (1955)

  • Hawthorne

    From Nathaniel Hawthorne, a 19th-century American author best known for The Scarlet Letter (1850), The House of the Seven Gables (1851) and The Blithedale Romance (1852)

  • Heller

    From Joseph Heller, a 20th-century American author known for Catch-22 (1961), Something Happened (1974), and Closing Time (1994), and others

  • Herbert

    From Frank Herbert, a 20th-century American author best known for the Dune series (1965-1984)

  • Homer

    The ancient Greek author of the Iliad and the Odyssey

  • Hugo

    From Victor Hugo, a 19th-century French author best known for Les Miserables (1862), The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1981), and The Man Who Laughs (1869)

  • Huxley

    From Aldous Huxley, a 20th-century English philosopher and author, best known for Brave New World (1932), Island (1962), The Doors of Perception (1954), and Point Counter Point (1928)

  • Hawking

    From Stephen Hawking, a 20th- and 21st-century English theoretical physicist, cosmologist, and author best known for A Brief History of Time (1988), The Theory of Everything (2002), and The Universe in a Nutshell (2001)

  • Hurston

    From Zora Neale Hurston, a 20th-century American author best known for Their Eyes Were Watching God (1937), Dust Tracks on a Road (1942), and Mules and Men (1935)

  • James

    From Henry James, a 19th- and 20th-century American writer known for The Turn of the Screw (1898), The Portrait of a Lady (1881), The Wings of the Dove (1902), The Ambassadors (1903), and others

  • King

    From Stephen King, a 20th- and 21st-century American author best known for The Shining (1977), Carrie (1974), The Stand (1978), It (1986), and Salem’s Lot (1975), among many others

  • Kipling

    From Rudyard Kipling, a 19th- and 20th-century English author best known for The Jungle Book (1894), Kim (1901), and Just So Stories (1902)

  • Lawrence

    From D. H. Lawrence, a 19th- and 20th-century English author best known for Lady Chatterley’s Lover (1928), Sons and Lovers (1913), The Rainbow (1915), and Women in Love (1920)

  • Lee

    From Harper Lee, a 20th- and 21st-century American author best known for To Kill a Mockingbird (1960) and Go Set a Watchman (2015)

  • Lewis

    From C. S. Lewis, a 20th-century British author known for The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (1950), Mere Christianity (1952), The Great Divorce (1945), and many others

  • Martin

    From George R. R. Martin, a 20th- and 21st-century American author best known for the A Song of Ice and Fire series (1996-ongoing)

  • Miller

    From Arthur Miller, a 20th-century American playwright and author known for The Crucible (1952), Death of a Salesman (1949), and others

  • Milton

    From John Milton, a 17th-century English author known for Paradise Lost (1667), Paradise Regained (1671), Aeropagitica (1644), and many others

  • Mitchell

    From Margaret Mitchell, a 20th-century American author best known for Gone with the Wind (1936) and Lost Laysen (1996)

  • Morrison

    From Toni Morrison, a 20th- and 21st-century American author best known for Beloved (1987), The Bluest Eyes (1970), and Song of Solomon (1977), among many others

  • Moriarty

    From Liane Moriarty, a 20th- and 21st-century Australian author known for The Husband’s Secret (2013), What Alice Forgot (2009), Three Wishes (2003), and many others

  • Orwell

    From George Orwell, the pen name of Eric Arthur Blair, a 20th-century English author known for 1984 (1949), Animal Farm (1945), Down and Out in Paris and London (1933), and others

  • Ovid

    The ancient Roman poet known for writing Ars Amatoria (2 AD) and Metamorphoses (8 AD), among many other works

  • Poe

    From Edgar Allan Poe, a 19th-century American poet and author best known for The Raven (1845), The Black Cat (1843), and The Tell-Tale Heart (1843)

  • Rowling

    From J. K. Rowling, a 20th- and 21st-century British author best known for the Harry Potter series (1997-2007), Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them (2001), and The Casual Vacancy (2012)

  • Salinger

    From J. D. Salinger, a 20th-century American author best known for The Catcher in the Rye (1951), Franny and Zoey (1961), and Nine Stories (1953)

  • Thoreau

    From Henry David Thoreau, a 19th-century American philosopher, abolitionist, naturalist, and author known for Walden (1854) and Civil Disobedience (1849)

  • Twain

    From Mark Twain, the pen name of Samuel Langhorne Clemens, a 19th-century American author best known for The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876) and Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884)

  • Tolkien

    From J. R. R. Tolkien, a 20th-century English author best known for The Hobbit (1937), The Lord of the Rings (1954), and The Silmarillion (1977)

  • Tolstoy

    From Leo Tolstoy, a 19th-century Russian author best known for War and Peace (1869), Anna Karenina (1877), The Death of Ivan Ilych (1886), and A Confession (1882), among many others

  • Verne

    From Jules Verne, a 19th-century French author known for Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea (1870), Journey to the Center of the Earth (1864), The Mysterious Island (1874), and others

  • Virgil

    An ancient Roman poet of the Augustan period, known for writing Georgics (29 BC), Eclogues (≈40 BC), and The Aeneid (29-19 BC)

  • Warren

    From Robert Penn Warren, a 20th-century American writer best known for All the King’s Men (1946) and World Enough and Time (1950)

  • Wharton

    From Edith Wharton, a 19th- and 20th-century American author best known for The Age of Innocence (1920), The House of Mirth (1905), Ethan Frome (1911), and The Buccaneers (1938), among many others

  • Woolf

    From Virginia Woolf, a 20th-century English author best known for Mrs. Dalloway (1925), Orlando (1928), To the Lighthouse (1927), and A Room of One’s Own (1929), among others

  • Wilde

    From Oscar Wilde, a 19th- and 20th-century Irish author known for The Picture of Dorian Gray (1890), The Importance of Being Earnest (1896), and The Happy Prince and Other Tales (1888)