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Fictional Princess Names

  1. IreneHeart
    • Origin:

      Greek
    • Meaning:

      "peace"
    • Description:

      Serene Irene, the name of the Greek goddess of peace and one of the most familiar Greek goddess names, was hugely popular in ancient Rome and again in the United States a hundred years ago.
  2. BlairHeart
    • Origin:

      Scottish
    • Meaning:

      "dweller on the plain"
    • Description:

      In the USA, Blair is gaining momentum, rising quickly for the last 10 years and likely to continue to climb. In England and Wales, where Blair has political connotations – calling to mind former prime minister Tony Blair – it is much less common, although it is in use for boys in its native Scotland.
  3. IsabelleHeart
    • Origin:

      French variation of Isabel
    • Meaning:

      "pledged to God"
    • Description:

      Isabelle is the French variation of Isabel, which emerged in the Middle ages as an Occitan form of Elizabeth. Medieval queens Isabella of Angoulême and Isabella of France helped popularize the name in the United Kingdom. Isobel is the Scottish version, Isabella the Italian, and Izabel is used in Brazil.
  4. DeliaHeart
    • Origin:

      Greek
    • Meaning:

      "born on the island of Delos"
    • Description:

      Delia is a somewhat neglected southern charmer that stands on its own but also might be short for Adelia or Cordelia.
  5. JasmineHeart
    • Origin:

      Flower name, from Persian
    • Meaning:

      "gift from God"
    • Description:

      Jasmine was derived from the Persian word yasmin, referring to the jasmine flower. Scented oil was made from the plant, and it was used as a perfume throughout the Persian Empire. Variants include Jazmin, Yasmin, Yasmine, and Jessamine.
  6. HadleyHeart
    • Origin:

      English
    • Meaning:

      "heather field"
    • Description:

      Hadley, most famous as the name of Ernest Hemingway's first wife, is more sophisticated, professional, and modern than cousins Harley, Haley, or Hayden. The hit book The Paris Wife, a novel by Paula McLain told from the point of view of Hadley Hemingway (born Elizabeth Hadley Richardson), has helped popularize the name, which also appears on the vampire show True Blood. Hadley could become this generation's Hailey. Adley, a mashup of Hadley and Addie, has also appeared on the scene.
  7. MarieHeart
    • Origin:

      French variation of Mary
    • Meaning:

      "drop of the sea, bitter, or beloved"
    • Description:

      The ubiquitous French version of Mary came into the English-speaking world in the nineteenth century. In the United States, Marie was a huge hit at the turn of the last century and for the ensuing fifty years, becoming the seventh most popular name in the country for three years, from 1901 to 1904.
  8. UnaHeart
    • Origin:

      Latin, Irish, or Old Norse
    • Meaning:

      "one; lamb; happy"
    • Description:

      In an epic poem, the personification of truth, beauty, and unity; this ancient name is popular in several European countries but less common in the US. The Oona spelling is slightly more popular but Una sleeker.
  9. FallonHeart
    • Origin:

      Irish
    • Meaning:

      "leader"
    • Description:

      Fallon is one of several boyish surname names introduced in the over-the-top 1980s nighttime soap Dynasty: they sounded cutting-edge at the time, but no longer.
  10. ElsaHeart
    • Origin:

      German diminutive of Elisabeth
    • Meaning:

      "pledged to God"
    • Description:

      Lost in limbo for decades and decades, Elsa now stands a good chance of following along in the progression from Emma to Ella to Etta, thanks to the ice queen heroine who "Let It Go" in the wildly popular Disney movie Frozen. The name shot all the up to Number 286 (its highest ranking since the 1890s) in the year after the release of the movie, though it's now dropped back down the list in the US.
  11. EsmeraldaHeart
    • Origin:

      Spanish and Portuguese
    • Meaning:

      "emerald"
    • Description:

      Esmeralda came into use as an applied use of the Spanish word for emerald, esmeralda. In the 1831 Victor Hugo novel Notre-Dame de Paris, also known as The Hunchback of Notre-Dame, the heroine was born Agnes, but called La Esmeralda in reference to the jewel she wears around her neck. The name Esmeralda got increased visibility via the Disney version of the story.
  12. DanielleHeart
    • Origin:

      French feminine variation of Daniel, Hebrew,"God is my judge"
    • Meaning:

      "God is my judge"
    • Description:

      Along with Daniela, Michelle, Nicole, and Denise, Danielle was a big hit from the 1960s to the nineties, sitting comfortably in the Top 20 for several years. Parents then responded to its chic, sophisticated Gallic image, and though it has lost some of its sheen, it's still a widely used choice. Novelist Danielle Steele is its most well-known bearer; it's also the name of Elvis's granddaughter.
  13. ArielHeart
    • Origin:

      Hebrew
    • Meaning:

      "lion of God"
    • Description:

      Ariel is a male Biblical name, seen there as the messenger of Ezra, and also used as a symbolic name for the city of Jerusalem, while Shakespeare used it for a (male) sprite in The Tempest.
  14. CelestiaHeart
    • Origin:

      Variation of Celeste, Latin
    • Meaning:

      "heavenly"
    • Description:

      Celestia is a heavenly name that sounds more ethereal than Celeste, Celestia might make a distinctive, feminine choice if your taste runs toward names like Angelina and Seraphina.
  15. GiselleHeart
    • Origin:

      German
    • Meaning:

      "pledge, hostage"
    • Description:

      Brazilian supermodel Gisele Bundchen undoubtedly gave this name a boost. The French pronunciation (jiz-ELLE) gives it a more graceful, balletic, gazellelike feel.
  16. AnnelieseHeart
    • Origin:

      German, Dutch
    • Meaning:

      "grace + oath"
    • Description:

      Anneliese is a German and Dutch combination of Anna and Liese (a form of Elizabeth) with an Old World feel but modern appeal. The Anglicized Annalise spelling in in the US Top 500, but this authentic German version has only ever broken into the US Top 1000 once, back in 2005.
  17. LeiaHeart
    • Origin:

      Spelling variation of Leya, Spanish; Hindi
    • Meaning:

      "the law; lion"
    • Description:

      This spelling variation of Leya was popularized by the Star Wars films, but is still firmly in the US Top 1000 many years later. This spelling is also probably preferred as it is clearer in pronunciation to the original Hindi name, Leya (which sometime gets pronounced Lee-ah).
  18. EowynHeart
    • Origin:

      Literature
    • Meaning:

      "horse lover"
    • Description:

      A literary name created by J. R. R. Tolkien for a Lord of the Rings noblewoman of Rohan. Properly spelled with an accent over the first E – Éowyn – it would make an interesting choice for literature lovers or fans of names like Elowen and Evelyn.
  19. KathleenHeart
    • Origin:

      Anglicized form of Irish Caitlin
    • Meaning:

      "pure"
    • Description:

      Kathleen is the early Irish import version that came between Katherine and Kaitlin, and which hasn't been used in so long it's almost beginning to sound fresh again. It was a surprise pick by one of the hip Dixie Chicks, Martie Maguire. Kathleen was a Top 10 name from 1948 to 1951, and it is the subject of several old sentimental songs, such as "I'll Take You Home Again, Kathleen."
  20. EliaHeart
    • Origin:

      Italian variation of Elijah, Hebrew
    • Meaning:

      "Jehovah is God"
    • Description:

      Though the most famous Elia, screenwriter Kazan, was male, this name sounds like a spin on many popular girls' names, from Ella to Ellie to Isla and Leah. While the Italian pronunciation has the middle syllable as LEE, making it closer to the original Elijah would give the middle syllable a long I sound -- eh-LYE-ah.