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Boy Names ALWAYS in the Top 1000

There are just over 200 baby boy names that have been on the Top 1000 since 1880, when the U.S. Social Security office began tracking baby names. The classic boy names here are included among that elite group that has been perennially popular. For the full group plus analysis, see our blog on perennially popular boy baby names.

  • Adam

    Adam -- a primal Old Testament name -- was revived as a 1960s cowboy name. Adam is not as popular as it once was and feels ready for a respite, replaced by newer A names like Aidan/Aiden, Avery... Read More 

  • Alex

    The independent Alex has become a classic in its own right. One of the truest unisex names, Alex is used almost equally for both sexes. Alex is... Read More 

  • Alfred

    Alfred is up off his recliner! If you're looking for a path to Fred, you can go directly to Frederick or take the long way around with the so-out-it's-in-again Alfred. Alfred is quite popular in... Read More 

  • Andrew

    Andrew is a variant of the Greek name Andreas, ultimately derived from the element aner, meaning “man.” In the New Testament, Andrew was one of the twelve apostles and the first disciple... Read More 

  • Antonio

    Antonio is a Shakespearean favorite -- the Bard used it in no less than five of his plays, and has long been a ubiquitous classic in Spanish-speaking countries, where the nickname Tonio is also... Read More 

  • Arthur

    Arthur, once the shining head of the Knights of the Round Table, is, after decades of neglect, now being polished up and restored by some stylish parents, emerging as a top contender among Read More 

  • Ben

    Ben, the diminutive of Benjamin or Benedict, can easily stand on its own as a simple, strong, nice-guy choice, though it's somewhat attenuated. Ben is this generation's Bob or Bill. Read More 

  • Carlos

    Notable namesakes include musician Santana, writers Fuentes and Castaneda, and numerous athletes. Carlos Irwin Estevez is the birth name of Charlie Sheen.Read More 

  • Charles

    Charles was derived from the Germanic name Karl, which came from the word karlaz, meaning “free man.” The now-defunct Anglo-Saxon variation of Charles was Ceorl, from which the word... Read More 

  • Christian

    Christian has fallen a bit from its 90's and 00's heights, but it's still quite popular. Once considered overly pious, Christian is now seen as making a bold statement of faith by some, while also... Read More 

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