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Latin Names for Boys

Latin names for boys have held a vast array of connotations over the millennia.
Latin boys’ names have been very popular among the European aristocracy during some periods.

Some Latin names conjure images of Ancient Rome, while others feel more understated.The two most popular Latin boys’ names in the United States are Oliver and Lucas.

Along with Oliver and Lucas, other Latin boys’ names in the US Top 200 include Adrian, Dominic, Jude, Julian, Leo, Miles, Roman, and Sebastian.

Baby boy names popular in Rome include Christian — the most common Latin boys’ name in Italy — Anthony, Santiago, and Leo.

Latin names for boys, such as Caius and Remus, were also given by masters to their slaves in the Antebellum South, making them particularly resonant among African-Americans.

Latin boys’ names are coming into fashion, on balance, in the U.S., so this list of Latin names for boys is well worth exploring.The top names below rank among the current US Top 1000 Baby Names and are ordered by popularity.Unique names rank below the Top 1000 and are listed alphabetically.
See Unique Latin Names for Boys

Top Latin Names for Boys

  • Oliver

    Oliver derives from Olivier, the Norman French variation of the Ancient Germanic name Alfher or the Old Norse Aleifr, which comes from Olaf. Olivier emerged as the dominant spelling for its... Read More 

  • Lucas

    Lucas is the Latin derivation of the Greek name Loukas. The meaning of the name references Lucania, an ancient territory in Southern Italy. Lucas is related to the names Luke and Luca; however,... Read More 

  • Sebastian

    Sebastian is derived from the Greek Sebastianos, meaning “from Sebastia.” Sebastia was a city in Asia Minor—modern day Sivas, Turkey. Sebastian is a name with a substantial history, first as the... Read More 

  • Julian

    Julian was derived from Iulianus, which in turn came from Julius, the Roman family name from ioulos, a Greek term meaning “downy-bearded.” Julian was a 4th century Roman emperor, and St.... Read More 

  • Mateo

    Mateo is a Latinate form of Matthew, which derived from the Hebrew name Mattiyahu, consisting of the elements mattan, meaning “gift” and yah, which references the Hebrew God.... Read More 

  • Anthony

    Anthony is derived from the Roman family name Antonii, and was initially used as Antony, without the “h.” The name evolved into Anthony in the 17th century, when it was speculated that it derived... Read More 

  • Leo

    Leo was derived from the Latin leo, meaning “lion.” Thirteen popes have carried the name, including St. Leo the Great. In Germanic languages, Leo has historically been used as a nickname... Read More 

  • Christian

    Christian has fallen a bit from its 90's and 00's heights, but it's still quite popular. Once considered overly pious, Christian is now seen as making a bold statement of faith by some, while also... Read More 

  • Adrian

    Adrian is derived from Hadrianus, a Roman family name meaning “from Hadria.” There were two Roman towns called Hadria, the first in Northern Italy, modern day Adria, and the second in Central... Read More 

  • Dominic

    Dominic comes from the Latin name Dominicus and is common in the Roman-Catholic community. In the past it has been given to boys born on Sunday—the word “Sunday” in languages including Spanish and... Read More