Names that Peaked in 1883

  1. Montgomery
    • Origin:

      Norman
    • Meaning:

      "man power"
    • Description:

      This image of this distinguished Anglo-Scottish surname, drawn from the French place name of the ancient castle of Saint Foi de Montgomery, is rapidly shifting from fusty and formal to cool. And dashing short form Monty (or Monte) nudges it to cute.
  2. Johanna
    • Origin:

      Hebrew
    • Meaning:

      "God is gracious"
    • Description:

      Johanna is the version of this name used in Holland, Germany, and Scandinavia. The extra h makes Johanna a slightly more dignified version of Joanna.
  3. Estella
    • Origin:

      Latinate form of Estelle
    • Meaning:

      "star"
    • Description:

      Estella is a pretty Latin name that's sounding more and more stylish, remembered as the ward of Miss Haversham in Dickens's Great Expectations. Though Estella ranked as high as Number 110 in the 1880s, it now sits near the bottom of the US Top 1000 along with near-twin Estelle. Either would be well worth considering as an alternative to the popular Stella.
  4. Roxy
    • Origin:

      Diminutive of Roxanne, Persian
    • Meaning:

      "dawn"
    • Description:

      Roxy, also spelled Roxie, is one of those high-stepping showgal names with plenty of moxie, among the many sassy nickname names on the U.K. popularity list--currently Number 398.
  5. Bee
    • Origin:

      Animal name or diminutive of Beatrice
    • Meaning:

      "she who brings happiness"
    • Description:

      We've seen Beatrice and Beatrix climb in popularity, along with traditional nickname Bea. And now there's Bee, giving it a buzzy nature world spin, plus a tie to popular late night TV''s Samantha Bee, not to mention Aunt Bee on the old The Andy Griffith Show TV show. Bee can theoretically be short for any girl names starting with B.
  6. Allie
    • Origin:

      Variation or diminutive of Alexandra, Alice or Allison
    • Description:

      Allie is one short form that's gotten so popular it's often used as a name on its own. Cute, friendly, yet we'd recommend using one of the proper names such as Alice to give your daughter an option. These days, Ellie might be more fashionable.
  7. Junia
    • Origin:

      Latin, Feminine variation of Junius
    • Meaning:

      "born in June"
    • Description:

      Juno is hot, June is showing signs of a comeback along with other month and day names, whereas Junia, the name of the the first century Christian referred to by the apostle Paul as an apostle (and who may have been male), is yet to be discovered.
  8. Adah
    • Origin:

      Hebrew
    • Meaning:

      "ornament"
    • Description:

      Adah is a biblical name twice over—one was the mother of Jabal and Jubal, the other was a wife of Esau. The latter Adah and Esau’s descendants settled in Edom and became the Edomites. Adah is unrelated to the visually similar name Ada, which is Germanic in origin.
  9. Elisha
    • Origin:

      Hebrew
    • Meaning:

      "God is my salvation"
    • Description:

      Creative name whose only limitation is that it looks like it would be pronounced akin to Alicia and Elissa — although as a Biblical boys’ name, it is traditionally pronounced ee-LIE-shah.
  10. Maud
    • Origin:

      English and French diminutive of Matilda, German
    • Meaning:

      "battle-mighty"
    • Description:

      Maud, lacy and mauve-tinted, was wildly popular a hundred years ago but has been rarely heard in the past fifty. Some stylish parents are starting to choose Maud again, especially as a middle. Maude is another spelling, associated with actress Maude Apatow.
  11. Ananias
    • Origin:

      Hebrew
    • Meaning:

      "God has given"
    • Description:

      Ananias is a New Testament name of three different figures. The two good ones were a high priest and a disciple of Paul. The not good Ananias was the husband of Sapphira who conspired to deceive the apostles and was struck dead.
  12. Zack
    • Origin:

      Short form of Zachary or Zachariah
    • Description:

      As the common short form of Zachary or, more unusually, Zachariah, Zack is less intuitive than Zach or Zac in terms of spelling but clearer in terms of pronunciations. Maybe because it rhymes with Jack and Mack, it also feels more complete as a name. Some people also use Zack and brothers as a short form of Isaac.
  13. Amalie
    • Origin:

      Danish, Norwegian, and German form of Amalia or Amelia
    • Meaning:

      "work"
    • Description:

      In European countries where it's regularly used as a form of the Amelia family of names, the pronunciation is very similar to the a-ending form, Amalia.
  14. Zena
    • Origin:

      Greek variation of Xena
    • Description:

      Familiar through the similarly pronounced TV Warrior Princess, but the original Xena spelling is cooler.
  15. Festus
    • Origin:

      Latin
    • Meaning:

      "joyous, festive"
    • Description:

      A name from the ancient world that may get a mixed reception today. On the one hand, festive! On the other hand, fester. In the Bible, Porcius Festus was a Roman official who rubbed up against St Paul. In modern times, this name has had more love in African countries than anywhere else.
  16. Bertha
    • Origin:

      German
    • Meaning:

      "bright, glorious"
    • Description:

      Ever since the enormous German cannon was dubbed by Allied soldiers "Big Bertha" in World War I, this name hasn't worked for a sweet little baby girl. But this was not always so. Hard as it might be to imagine now, Bertha was a Top 100 name until the 1930s, and in the 1880s was the seventh most popular name in the land--the equal of Joseph.
  17. Newt
    • Origin:

      English
    • Meaning:

      "a small salamander"
    • Description:

      Rarely used on its own and irrevocably tied to former House Speaker Gingrich -- who was christened Newton.
  18. Caro
    • Origin:

      Diminuitve of Carol or Caroline, English, French ,"free man"
    • Meaning:

      "free man"
    • Description:

      Upper-crusty nickname occasionally used in Britain, particularly in 1930s novels featuring significant garden party scenes, but eclipsed here by Carrie et al.
  19. Hamilton
    • Origin:

      English and Scottish
    • Meaning:

      "treeless hill"
    • Description:

      Unless it runs in your family, or Alexander Hamilton is your particular hero, you might consider something less imposing -- and without the teasable nickname Ham.
  20. Sumner
    • Origin:

      English occupational name
    • Meaning:

      "summoner"
    • Description:

      Billionaire Sumner Redstone, the nonagenarian owner of CBS and Viacom, practically has a monopoly on his first name — for now. But Hunter, Asher, and Ryder have ushered in a major vogue "-er" names, so it may only be a matter of time before parents discover this one.