~ Names I liked when I was a child ~

Names that I used for dolls, plush toys, imaginary friends, names I was fond of for whatever reason.
  1. Alexis
    • Origin:

      Greek
    • Meaning:

      "defender"
    • Description:

      Alexis, a one-time exclusively-boys’ name, was more popular than its sister Alexandra for quite a while, but in recent years Alexandra has overtaken it once again. Alexis was a Top 20 girls’ name from 1994-2010 but has experienced a decline in popularity in recent years, though now it's one of the top unisex names.
  2. Audrey
    • Origin:

      English
    • Meaning:

      "noble strength"
    • Description:

      Audrey is one of the girls' names that have been rising due to their connection to Old Hollywood glamour—in this case the eternally chic and radiant Audrey Hepburn. Audrey has another very different appeal as one of the elite group of girl names that mean strong, brave, or powerful.
  3. Appolodia
    • Becky
      • Origin:

        Diminutive of Rebecca
      • Description:

        One of those casual down-home names last popular in the 1960s.
    • Bianca
      • Origin:

        Italian
      • Meaning:

        "white"
      • Description:

        Bianca, the livelier Italian and Shakespearean version of Blanche, has been chosen by many American parents since the 1990s, just as Blanca is a favorite in the Spanish-speaking community. Its meaning of white relates to snow, making it one of the prime names for winter babies.
    • Bill
      • Origin:

        English, diminutive of William
      • Meaning:

        "resolute protection"
      • Description:

        Most Bills today are dads...or grandpas. The younger Williams are usually nicknamed Will, or called by their full names.
    • Chelsea
      • Origin:

        London and New York place-name
      • Description:

        Chelsea is still being used, with about 400 baby girls named Chelsea in the US last year. But it was much more popular a few decades ago, peaking at Number 15 in 1992.
    • Courtney
      • Origin:

        French
      • Meaning:

        "short nose"
      • Description:

        Among the Top 20 names of the 1990s, today's Courtney is more apt to be the babysitter than the baby. Courtney has dropped since its peak at Number 17 in 1995. Familiar from Courtney Love and Courtney Cox.
    • Eeva
      • Elizabeth
        • Origin:

          Hebrew
        • Meaning:

          "pledged to God"
        • Description:

          Elizabeth is one of the most popular girls' names of all time, the female equivalent of James or William. Yet Elizabeth has so much going for it—rich history, broad appeal, and timeless style—that no matter how many little girls are named Lizzie, Eliza, and Beth, you can still make Elizabeth your own.
      • Gretchen
        • Origin:

          German, diminutive of Margarethe
        • Meaning:

          "pearl"
        • Description:

          Like Greta, Gretchen is a German Margaret diminutive that has become an American quasi-classic, though not much used today, having dropped off the list in 2009. She was at her high point in the 1970s, making it into the top 200.
      • Heidi
        • Origin:

          Diminutive of Adelheid; German
        • Meaning:

          "noble, nobility"
        • Description:

          Heidi became known—and popular—via the 1880 eponymous children's classic by Swiss writer Johanna Spyri and, despite decades of American Heidis of all sizes, shapes, and personalities, the name seems permanently tethered to that spunky little girl on the Alpine mountaintop in the book and Shirley Temple movie.
      • Inga
        • Origin:

          Norse
        • Meaning:

          "guarded by Ing"
        • Description:

          Ing was a powerful Norse god whose name inspired several modern variations -- though Inga has become a caricatured Scandinavian choice.
      • Karen
        • Origin:

          Danish variation of Katherine
        • Meaning:

          "pure"
        • Description:

          Karen is a Danish diminutive of Katherine, an English name derived from the Greek Aikaterine. The etymology of Aikaterine is contested, but generally considered to have arisen from the Greek root katharos, meaning "pure." Kaja is a related name, as it is another Danish variation of Katherine.
      • Kimberly
        • Origin:

          English surname and place name
        • Meaning:

          "Cyneburga's meadow"
        • Description:

          Kimberly's heyday was in the 1960s and 70s, when it ranked among the Top 10. While it hasn't been stylish for decades, it's evidenced more staying power than some former hot girl names, remaining among the Top 300 girl names in the US, where it's stood for 70 years.
      • Rebecca
        • Origin:

          Hebrew
        • Meaning:

          "to tie, bind"
        • Description:

          Rebecca is a name representing beauty in the Bible, an Old Testament classic that reached the heights of revived popularity in the seventies but is still a well-used choice. It derives from the Hebrew name Rivkah, from the verb ribbqah, meaning "noose." The biblical Rebecca was the wife of Isaac and the mother of Esau and Jacob. Rebekah was a common spelling of the name in the Bible.
      • Shannon
        • Origin:

          Irish
        • Meaning:

          "old and wise"
        • Description:

          Irish place-name -- it's a river, a town, and an airport -- once popular but now supplanted by such newer immigrants as Saoirse and Seanan.
      • Shelly
        • Theo
          • Origin:

            Diminutive of Theodore
          • Meaning:

            "gift of God"
          • Description:

            See the popularity graph below for the name Theo? It's been heading straight uphill since 2010, when it hopped back onto the Top 1000 after a 60+ year absence.
        • Tristan
          • Origin:

            Celtic
          • Meaning:

            "noise or sorrowful"
          • Description:

            Tristan -- known through medieval legend and Wagnerian opera -- has a slightly wistful, touching air. This, combined with the name's popular "an" ending, makes Tristan very appealing to parents seeking a more original alternative to Christian.