Happy H's

  1. Haakon
    • Origin:

      Norse
    • Meaning:

      "chosen son"
    • Description:

      An ancient name that's been used by the Norwegian royal family; still popular there but not likely to appeal to many American parents.
  2. Hadrian
    • Origin:

      Latin
    • Meaning:

      "dark-haired"
    • Description:

      Most parents would find this old Roman name pretentious compared to the more accessible Adrian, but some history buffs just might want to commemorate the enlightened emperor.
  3. Halia
    • Origin:

      Hawaiian
    • Meaning:

      "remembrance of a loved one"
    • Description:

      Halia is one of Hawaii's top baby names, in the Top 50 for girls in 2021. But it's rare outside its native Hawaii, given to only 57 baby girls in the US last year.
  4. Hamish
    • Origin:

      Scottish variation of James
    • Meaning:

      "supplanter"
    • Description:

      Just as Seamus/Seumus is Irish for James, Hamish is the Scottish form — one that's not often used here, but still redolent of Olde Scotland. If you're ready to go further than Duncan and Malcolm, out to Laird and Ewan territory, this may be worth consideration. It also sounds just like the Yiddish word for homey.
  5. Hana
    • Origin:

      Hebrew, Hawaiian, Maori, Japanese
    • Meaning:

      "grace, work, glow, flower"
    • Description:

      Many things to many peoples: a flower name, also spelled Hanae, to the Japanese; a Czech and Polish short form of Johana; and an alternate form of the biblical name Hannah in the US. It also means "craft, work" in Hawaiian and "glow" in Maori.
  6. Hannelore
    • Origin:

      German
    • Meaning:

      "grace + god is my light"
    • Description:

      A pretty and substantial German smoosh name, a combination of Hanne and Eleonore. Most popular in Germany from the 1930s to the 1950s. Former German Chancellors Helmut Kohl and Helmut Schmidt both had wives named Hannelore.
  7. Honoria
    • Origin:

      Latin
    • Meaning:

      "woman of honor"
    • Description:

      This is an eighteenth century elaboration of Honor found in Charles Dickens (Bleak House) but rarely heard here and now.
  8. Hyacinth
    • Origin:

      Flower name, from Greek
    • Meaning:

      "blue larkspur; precious stone"
    • Description:

      Though it may not be as sweet and gentle as, say, Violet, the purple-hued Hyacinth still might hold some appeal for the parent seeking a truly unusual flower name.