Baby Girl

  1. Addison
    • Origin:

      English
    • Meaning:

      "son of Adam"
    • Description:

      Newly fashioned but familiar and with an on trend, unisex feel, Addison seems like the perfect solution for anyone who can’t decide between Madison, Adeline, and Alison.
  2. Ashton
    • Origin:

      English
    • Meaning:

      "ash tree place"
    • Description:

      Hot star Ashton Kutcher is pushing this unisex choice toward the boys' camp, but its variation Ashtyn is on the rise.
  3. Avonlea
    • Bristol
      • Origin:

        Place-name
      • Description:

        Bristol Palin, the daughter of former Alaska governor and Vice Presidential candidate Sarah Palin, grabbed her own share of headlines by having a baby out of wedlock and then appearing on Dancing With The Stars. She single-handedly propelled her distinctive name, inspired by a city in England, into the Top 1000 and up the charts. Bristol's ascent ended a few years back.
    • Bronwen
      • Origin:

        Welsh
      • Meaning:

        "white breast"
      • Description:

        Bronwen is widespread in Wales, but still rare enough here to sound somewhat international — we think Bronwen is a real winner. (Note: the Bronwyn spelling is an Anglicization, since the -wyn ending is masculine in Welsh).
    • Emerson
      • Origin:

        English
      • Meaning:

        "son of Emery"
      • Description:

        The combination of Emily and Emma's popularity -- and the fact that Desperate Housewives star Teri Hatcher's daughter is named Emerson -- have put this formerly strictly boys’ name, embodying the gravitas of Ralph Waldo Emerson, in the limelight for girls.
    • Jadon
      • Origin:

        Hebrew
      • Meaning:

        "God has heard"
      • Description:

        Though this name is beginning to be added for girls, it's not usually in the classic Biblical form. Most parents would use Jaden or other more "creative" spellings such as Jaidyn.
    • Joceline
      • Joelle
        • Origin:

          Feminine variation of Joel, Hebrew
        • Meaning:

          "Jehovah is his God"
        • Description:

          Joel is one of those boys’ names that's never been super-popular yet has never been UNpopular either -- it's been in the Top 400 in the US since we started keeping statistics in 1880. So it's inevitable that its female form Joelle would gain visibility too, and indeed Joelle was used most widely during Joel's reign in the Top 100, from the late 1960s through the early 1990s.
      • Jolie
        • Origin:

          French
        • Meaning:

          "pretty"
        • Description:

          Jolie is as pretty as its literal meaning; nowadays it is also seen as a girls’ name, via Angelina for whom Jolie was originally her middle name.
      • Monroe
        • Origin:

          Scottish
        • Meaning:

          "mouth of the Roe river"
        • Description:

          Monroe is a presidential name which, thanks to the immortal beauty of Marilyn Monroe, is catching on fast for baby girls. Mariah Carey and Nick Cannon chose it for their twin daughter, honoring Marilyn Monroe. Their use of Monroe as a girls’ name did much to revive this Old Man name, a la Sydney, as a newly fashionable choice for girls.
      • Rowen
        • Origin:

          Spelling variation of Rowan
        • Meaning:

          "little redhead"
        • Description:

          About seven times as many babies of both genders are named Rowan over Rowen, making this by far the secondary spelling. Rowan is used twice as often for boys, while Rowen runs three to one in the boys' favor, with about 300 boys named Rowen in a recent year compared with about 100 girls. That may be because of this spelling's similarity to Owen.
      • Sailor
        • Origin:

          Occupational name
        • Description:

          Supermodel Christie Brinkley launched an entire name genre when she picked this breezy occupational name for her daughter in 1998, and it has become more prevalent in recent decades. The Saylor version, which you might consider a spelling spin or a surname-name, is now among the Top 500 names for girls, given to three times as many baby girls as the Sailor spelling. Counted together, Saylor and Sailor were used for about 1000 baby girls in one recent year in the US, versus about 100 boys.