Vaguely Dark Academia Names

You thought the elegant castle sitting upon the hill was abandoned until you took a flight of stairs and heard the music. But you could never have predicted this. The cavernous ballroom alight from crystal chandeliers. The dimly lit corridors between tall bookshelves. The stained glass windows glowing rainbow from soft sunlight. And the people, oh, the people. Hurriedly, you snatch up a lace cloth napkin and a delightfully soft quill to scribble down their names.
  1. Leander
    • Adalynn
      • Origin:

        Variation of Adeline, French
      • Meaning:

        "noble, nobility"
      • Description:

        This popular form of the even-more-popular Adeline combines the trendy Ad- prefix with the equally trendy -lynn suffix. Adalynn is the second most widely-used form of this popular name next to the classic Adeline. Singer Chris Daughtry named his daughter Adalynn Rose.
    • Alaric
      • Origin:

        German
      • Meaning:

        "all-powerful ruler"
      • Description:

        Alaric is an ancient regal name that sounds modern enough to be considered. Alaric was a traditional name for the kings of the Ostrogoths, the most famous of whom was Alaric I, the King of the West Goths who sacked Rome in 410.
    • Alban
      • Origin:

        Latin
      • Meaning:

        "white, or, man from Alba"
      • Description:

        An ancient and highly unusual name; St. Alban -- sometimes also called Albinus or Aubin -- was an early martyr in Roman Britain. Using an alternate spelling, Alben Barkley was the 35th U.S. Vice-President, serving under Harry Truman. And Albin is popular in modern Sweden. But only the form Alban has the alternate meaning "from Alba".
    • Amadeus
      • Origin:

        Latin
      • Meaning:

        "lover of God"
      • Description:

        Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's middle name could make an interesting pick for music-loving parents--if only in middle place. Amadeus is the title of a Peter Shaffer play which became an award-winning film in 1984.
    • Ambrose
      • Origin:

        Latin
      • Meaning:

        "immortal"
      • Description:

        Gentle but grandiose and beloved by British novelists including Evelyn Waugh and P. G. Wodehouse, Ambrose was a fast rising name in 2022. Entering the UK Top 1000 for the first time and proving popular among Nameberry users, its elegance, softness, and vintage style means it fits in with popular Theodore, Sebastian, and Jeremiah.
    • Antigone
      • Origin:

        Greek
      • Meaning:

        "worthy of one's parents, in place of one's parents"
      • Description:

        In Greek mytholgy, Antigone was the noble and courageous daughter of Oedipus, who acts as his guide after he blinds himself. Antigone is also the eponymous heroine of a play by Jean Anouilh.
    • Aubrey
      • Origin:

        English from French version of German Alberic
      • Meaning:

        "elf ruler"
      • Description:

        Almost like a fusion between vintage Audrey, bubbly Ruby, and unisex Avery, Aubrey has been a popular choice for girls since the mid 2000’s.
    • August
      • Origin:

        German form of Latin Augustus
      • Meaning:

        "great, magnificent"
      • Description:

        The name August is at its highest point since the 1890s, when it ranked among the Top 100 boy names in the US. And deservedly so, given its great meaning, historic roots, and cool nicknames.
    • Aurelius
      • Origin:

        Latin
      • Meaning:

        "the golden one"
      • Description:

        Since Aurelius was given the supermodel seal of approval by Elle Macpherson, this is one of the Roman emperor names, like Augustus, now in the realm of possibility. Like the female Aurelia and Aurora, Aurelius has a particularly warm golden aura.
    • Asra
      • Basil
        • Origin:

          Greek
        • Meaning:

          "royal"
        • Description:

          Although Greek in origin--in the fourth century, a bishop by that name established the principles of the Greek Orthodox Church--Basil for years took on the aura of aquiline-nosed upper-class Britishness of Sherlock Holmes portrayer Basil Rathbone, then spiced with the fragrant aroma of the herb that entered with the Pesto generation.
      • Beatrix
        • Origin:

          Latin
        • Meaning:

          "she who brings happiness; blessed"
        • Description:

          Beatrix has a solid history of its own apart from Beatrice, with that final x adding a playful, animated note to the name's imposing history.
      • Benedict
        • Origin:

          Latin
        • Meaning:

          "blessed"
        • Description:

          Parents who like Ben and Benjamin but find those forms too popular sometimes consider Benedict as a more distinctive choice. Unlike the Old Testament Benjamin, Benedict is the name of the saint who formed the Benedictine Order and of fifteen popes,including a recent one.
      • Beowulf
        • Origin:

          Old English
        • Meaning:

          "bee wolf"
        • Description:

          This ancient name is that of the hero of the epic Beowulf, which is thought to be the oldest-ever poem in English lit written in the vernacular. J. R. R. Tolkien used the poem as one of his inspirations for The Lord of the Rings.
      • Bernard
        • Origin:

          German
        • Meaning:

          "strong, brave as a bear"
        • Description:

          Bernard is obviously a saint's name, but how did it get to the big, benevolent dog? The eleventh century monk, patron saint of mountain climbers, who lived in the Alps, was famed for setting up safe houses for pilgrims on their way to Rome over the treacherous St. Bernard Pass, and the canine breed, also used to rescue people in treacherous conditions, was named for him.
      • Briar
        • Origin:

          English
        • Meaning:

          "a thorny patch"
        • Description:

          Fairy-tale memories of Sleeping Beauty inspire some parents—such as Rachel Bilson and Hayden Christensen—to call their daughters Briar Rose. But Briar plus a different middle name might work even better. It's one of the newly popular nature-word names, charting in the US for the first time in 2015 for both genders.
      • Bryony
        • Origin:

          Latin flower name
        • Meaning:

          "to sprout"
        • Description:

          Bryony is an unusually strong plant name --the bryony is a wild climbing vine with green flowers --that caught on in the U.K. before sprouting here. The name of the young character in the Ian McEwan novel Atonement is spelled Briony, which is the variation and Bryony the original.
      • Casimir
        • Origin:

          Polish, Slavic
        • Meaning:

          "destroyer of peace"
        • Description:

          Casimir, a traditional name of Polish kings, could do quite well these days as we see the rise of Caspian, Cassius, Castiel, et. al. Like Leopold and Laszlo, Casimir is strong and worth considering if you've got an adventurous streak — and bet your son will too.
      • Caspian
        • Origin:

          Place name
        • Meaning:

          "white"
        • Description:

          One of the most romantic of appellations, Caspian is a geographical name referring to the large salty sea between Asia and Europe. It's also the name of the hero of C.S. Lewis's beloved Chronicles of Narnia, Prince Caspian.