-Character Names-

These are names I would use for literary characters if I ever write a novel.
  1. Ademar
    • Origin:

      Germanic
    • Meaning:

      "wealth and fame"
    • Description:

      Worn by several medieval troubadours, this name is still used in French, Spanish and Portuguese-speaking countries.
  2. Casimir
    • Origin:

      Polish, Slavic
    • Meaning:

      "destroyer of peace"
    • Description:

      Casimir, a traditional name of Polish kings, could do quite well these days as we see the rise of Caspian, Cassius, Castiel, et. al. Like Leopold and Laszlo, Casimir is strong and worth considering if you've got an adventurous streak — and bet your son will too.
  3. Eden
    • Origin:

      Hebrew
    • Meaning:

      "place of pleasure, delight"
    • Description:

      Eden is an attractive, serene name with obvious intimations of Paradise, one of several place names drawn from the Bible by the Puritans in the seventeenth century.
  4. Elior
    • Origin:

      Hebrew
    • Meaning:

      "My God is my light"
    • Description:

      This appealing Hebrew name is heard in Israel, and would fit in well with all the popular El-starting names for boys, such as Elliot and Ellery. It was given to just five American boys in 2015. Also worth considering is the pretty female version, Eliora.
  5. Lapis
    • Origin:

      Persian
    • Meaning:

      "azure blue stone"
    • Description:

      Out-of-the-ordinary gemstone name derived from lapis lazuli, which is said to enhance awareness and intellect, impart ancient wisdom and cure many ailments, making it an interesting possibility for a blue-eyed girl. Lazuli — or Azure or Blue — are other options.
  6. Lilith
    • Origin:

      Assyrian, Sumerian
    • Meaning:

      "ghost, night monster"
    • Description:

      Lilith is derived from the Akkadian word lilitu meaning "of the night." In Jewish folklore she is portrayed as Adam's rejected first wife, who was turned into a night demon for refusing to obey him. Lilith is unrelated to most other Lil- names, with the exception of Lilita, which is the Latvian variation.
  7. Nadezhda
    • Origin:

      Slavic
    • Meaning:

      "hope"
    • Description:

      Nadezhda is more familiar in the English-speaking world by its short forms, Nadia or Nadya. Well-used through the Slavic countries and Russia, Nadezhda was the name of Lenin's wife. Viewers of The Americans learned that this was the original Russian name of the spy known as Elizabeth Jennings, played by Keri Russell.
  8. Nasrin
    • Origin:

      Persian
    • Meaning:

      "wild rose"
    • Description:

      Nasrin has a strong sound and lovely floral meaning. International variants include the Turkish Nesrin and Egyptian Nesreen.
  9. Naviyd
    • Origin:

      Persian, variation of Naveed
    • Meaning:

      "good news"
    • Description:

      Usher put this spin on an attractive and popular Iranian name when he chose it for his son.
  10. Sigrid
    • Origin:

      Norse
    • Meaning:

      "fair victory"
    • Description:

      Sigrid is a distinctly Scandinavian name that is starting to edge out into the wider world, a la cousin Ingrid. Unfortunately, short form Siri is now off the table, but Sigrid is still a possibility.
  11. Slade
    • Origin:

      English
    • Meaning:

      "from the valley"
    • Description:

      Evoking the image of a shady glen, Slade could make a distinctive middle name. It entered the Top 1000 in 2007, and has been seen as a character name on the TV show "Smallville." It's also a name that pops up in comic books and video games.
  12. Valdemar
    • Origin:

      Nordic variation of Vladimir
    • Description:

      Ten years ago we would have advised people to steer clear of this name (and maybe choose the similar sounding Walter instead); but with the rise of other Nordic and Eastern European names like Viggo and Casimir, maybe its time to re-thing Valdemar. It's a big name, but with enough penache, it could be pulled off. Valdemar was introduced to Scandinavia in the 12th Century by a Danish king named for his Ukrainian grandfather, and is currently in the Danish Top 20.