Names That I Dislike

working on..
  1. Agnes
    • Origin:

      Greek
    • Meaning:

      "pure, virginal"
    • Description:

      Agnes is the Latin variation of the name Hagne, which itself derived from the Greek word hagnos, meaning "chaste." In medieval times, St. Agnes was a very popular saint, leading to its popularity as a girl's name. Agnes Grey is the title of one of the two novels written by Anne Brontë.
  2. Atticus
    • Origin:

      Latin
    • Meaning:

      "from Attica"
    • Description:

      Atticus, with its trendy Roman feel combined with the upstanding, noble image of Atticus Finch in To Kill a Mockingbird, is a real winner among boy names. Atticus entered the US Top 1000 in 2004 and is a firm Nameberry favorite.
  3. Beatrice
    • Origin:

      Latin
    • Meaning:

      "she who brings happiness; blessed"
    • Description:

      Beatrice is back. Stored in the attic for almost a century, the lovely Beatrice with its long literary (Shakespeare, Dante) and royal history is being looked at with fresh eyes by parents seeking a classic name with character and lots of upbeat nicknames, like Bea and Bee.
  4. Claud
    • Claudia
      • Origin:

        Feminine variation of Claude
      • Meaning:

        "lame; enclosure"
      • Description:

        Claudia is a classic name with ancient Roman roots. Never truly in or truly out, Claudia feels like a strong, modern choice that hits the sweet spot between too popular and too unusual..
    • Delilah
      • Origin:

        Hebrew or Arabic
      • Meaning:

        "delicate"
      • Description:

        Melodic and lively, Delilah has cut itself (mostly) free from its treacherous past to become a contemporary favorite.
    • Dexter
      • Origin:

        Latin
      • Meaning:

        "dyer, right-handed"
      • Description:

        The jazzy, ultra-cool Dexter, like most names with an "x," has a lot of energy and dynamism. Over the years, it's been attached to a number of diverse real and fictional personalities—C. K. Dexter Haven, the witty Cary Grant character in The Philadelphia Story; Dexter Green, the protagonist of the F. Scott Fitzgerald story "Winter Dreams"; great jazz tenor saxophonist Dexter Gordon; the boy-genius protagonist of cartoon Dexter's Laboratory; and the most recent TV series Dexter based on the books by Jeff Lindsay, whose lead happens to be a genial but sociopathic serial killer.
    • Ebenezer
      • Origin:

        Hebrew
      • Meaning:

        "stone of help"
      • Description:

        Ebenezer is the name of a biblical place --the stone set up by Samuel to mark his victory over the Philistines--rather than a person. It was adopted by the British Puritans as a first name and then exported to America, where it had some early popularity, even entering the Top 1000 in the 1880s.
    • Elvis
      • Origin:

        Meaning unknown
      • Description:

        When the King was alive, and for years afterwards, few people (except Declan McManus who became Elvis Costello) dared use his singular name, but now it's very much up for grabs.
    • Favorite
      • Origin:

        Word name
      • Description:

        Maybe if you're planning to have only one child -- and iffy even then.
    • Felix
      • Origin:

        Latin
      • Meaning:

        "happy, fortunate"
      • Description:

        Felix is one of those ancient but nontraditional names for boys that have come into favor over the past few decades, a favorite of parents who want a masculine name with history and heft that breaks ranks with the standard Franks and Freds. Felix is also an international darling, ranking in the Top 100 in several European and English-speaking countries.
    • Gertrude
      • Origin:

        German
      • Meaning:

        "strength of a spear"
      • Description:

        Could cute nickname Gertie, remembered as cute five-year-old Drew Barrymore in E.T., revive the long shunned Gertrude?
    • Igor
      • Origin:

        Old Norse via Russian
      • Meaning:

        "warrior"
      • Description:

        Musical association with Igor Stravinsky, but also Dr. Frankenstein's right-hand man.
    • Jack
      • Origin:

        English, diminutive of John
      • Meaning:

        "God is gracious"
      • Description:

        Jack may have fallen from its Number 1 place in England, but in the US it's as popular as it was at its height in the 1920s and 1930s. A durable, cheery, everyman form of John, Jack ranks as one of the most popular boy names starting with J.
    • Jermajesty
      • Origin:

        Invented name
      • Description:

        Jermajesty is a slightly bizarre name created by Jackson brother Jermaine, making his son a royal version of himself.
    • Jezebel
      • Origin:

        Hebrew
      • Meaning:

        "not exalted"
      • Description:

        Jezebel, the wife of King Ahab in the Hebrew Book of Kings, has long had a bad girl reputation. But in the modern secular world, this is somewhat mitigated by the feminist perspective of her as a strong woman, the power behind the throne. Previously avoided as a baby name, Jezebel is now, along with the also previously avoided Delilah and Desiree, coming into use, helped by its relation to other 'bel' name such as Isabel and Bella.
    • Katniss
      • Origin:

        Literary and botanical name
      • Description:

        Katniss Everdeen is the heroine of the popular Hunger Games trilogy by Suzanne Collins, whose name comes from the (very real) edible aquatic plant of the genus Sagittaria. Katniss's father tells her that if she "finds herself," she'll never go hungry. Other unusual botanical names in the series include Primrose, Posy, Rue, and Clove, all for girls. Several of the boys' names come from ancient Rome: Cato, Seneca, Flavius, Caesar. Katniss the name has less appeal than Katniss the heroine, though it's definitely more attractive than Renesmee.
    • Lester
      • Origin:

        English place-name; phonetic form of Leicester
      • Description:

        Lester is one of the British surname names that were popular in the US in the early decades of the twentieth century: it was in the Top 100 through 1931, reaching a high of Number 52 in 1906. But dropping of the list in the late 1990s, along with Hester and Sylvester, we don't see much hope for a return visit.
    • Lilith
      • Origin:

        Assyrian, Sumerian
      • Meaning:

        "ghost, night monster"
      • Description:

        Lilith is derived from the Akkadian word lilitu meaning "of the night." In Jewish folklore she is portrayed as Adam's rejected first wife, who was turned into a night demon for refusing to obey him. Lilith is unrelated to most other Lil- names, with the exception of Lilita, which is the Latvian variation.
    • Lucifer
      • Origin:

        Latin
      • Meaning:

        "light-bearer"
      • Description:

        Lucifer is the name of the archangel cast into hell -- theologians disagree on whether he and Satan are separate beings -- and as such has long been on the forbidden list for religious parents. Still banned in New Zealand, Lucifer is occasionally used in the contemporary U.S.: Six boys were given the name in the most recent year counted.