Shadow Hunter Names

Names that would fit perfectly into the world of The Shadow Hunter Chronicles (The Infernal Devices and The Mortal Instrument, being the main ones) by Cassandra Clare. Both the winding cobbles of 19th Century London, home to Tessa and Will, and modern day vibes of Brooklyn, New York, of Clary and Jace.
  1. Adelaide
    • Origin:

      Variant of Adelheidis, German
    • Meaning:

      "noble, nobility"
    • Description:

      Adelaide is now heading straight uphill on the coattails of such newly popular sisters as Ava, Ada, and Audrey, and in the company of Adeline and Amelia. It was chosen by actress Katherine Heigl for the name of her second daughter.
  2. Adrian
    • Origin:

      Latin
    • Meaning:

      "man of Adria"
    • Description:

      Adrian is one of those names that’s easy to picture on all kinds of people. From an active and energetic five-year-old to your great grandpa, from the coolest, breeziest guy you know, to the quiet, serious one, it’s no wonder Adrian has always made the US Top 500 since the early 20th century.
  3. Alasdair
    • Origin:

      Scottish variation of Alexander
    • Meaning:

      "defending men"
    • Description:

      In this country, more recognizable with the Alistair spelling.
  4. Ambrose
    • Origin:

      Latin
    • Meaning:

      "immortal"
    • Description:

      Gentle but grandiose and beloved by British novelists including Evelyn Waugh and P. G. Wodehouse, Ambrose was a fast rising name in 2022. Entering the UK Top 1000 for the first time and proving popular among Nameberry users, its elegance, softness, and vintage style means it fits in with popular Theodore, Sebastian, and Jeremiah.
  5. Anastacia
    • Origin:

      Greek variation of Anastasia
    • Meaning:

      "resurrection"
    • Description:

      Gorgeous name in any form, though the c may muddy the pronunciation.
  6. Arabella
    • Origin:

      Latin
    • Meaning:

      "yielding to prayer"
    • Description:

      Arabella, lovely and elegant, has long been well used in Britain and finally made it onto the American list in 2005. Its meaning may also be interpreted as "beautiful," thanks to -bella.
  7. Ariadne
    • Origin:

      Greek
    • Meaning:

      "most holy"
    • Description:

      This name of the Cretan goddess of fertility is most popular now as the more melodic Ariana, but Ariadne has possibilities of its own. It first entered the US Top 1000 in 2014. The renewed interest in the name falls in line with the revival of other mythological names like Apollo and Athena. The trendy nickname Ari doesn't hurt either.
  8. Bartholomew
    • Origin:

      Aramaic
    • Meaning:

      "son of the furrow"
    • Description:

      Bartholomew is an apostle's name that's been out of favor for centuries but might appeal again to the parent in search of an old but rare choice. The challenge could be to avoid the Simpson-ish nickname. That character, by the way, has the full name of Bartholomew JoJo Simpson, and creator Matt Groening came up with Bart as an--uh oh--anagram for brat. Two old alternate nicknames are Barty and Tolly.
  9. Caleb
    • Origin:

      Hebrew
    • Meaning:

      "dog; whole heart"
    • Description:

      Caleb is an attractive Old Testament name that has been in the US Top 100 for nearly three decades now. Consistently popular but never too popular, Caleb feels more like a classic than a momentary trend.
  10. Caspar
    • Origin:

      Persian, variation of Gaspar
    • Meaning:

      "keeper of the treasure"
    • Description:

      After half a century, this otherwise feasible name has at last started to lose its link to the friendly ghost; it certainly didn't scare model Claudia Schiffer, who chose it for her son, as did Atomic Kitten Jenny Frost. Iconoclastic namer Jason Lee switched genders and called his daughter Casper. Also related to the revived Jasper, Caspar seems headed towards the path to a similar resurgence.
  11. Cordelia
    • Origin:

      Latin; Celtic
    • Meaning:

      "heart; daughter of the sea"
    • Description:

      Cordelia is exactly the kind of old-fashioned, grown-up name for girls that many parents are seeking for their daughters today. The name of King Lear's one sympathetic daughter, Cordelia has both style and substance along with its Shakespearean pedigree.
  12. Calliope
    • Elaina
      • Origin:

        Variation of Elaine or Elena,"bright, shining light"
      • Meaning:

        "bright, shining light"
      • Description:

        While both Elaine and Elena are on an upward trajectory, Elaina has shifted up and down the charts in recent years, making no big moves in either direction. Steadily used, this blend of the two could make it clearer which pronunciation is preferred.
    • Ezekiel
      • Origin:

        Hebrew
      • Meaning:

        "God strengthens"
      • Description:

        Ezekiel used to be reduced to its nickname Zeke, but modern parents now embrace it in full for its power and dignity. Along with biblical brethren Asher and Ezra, Ezekiel is rising steadily up the popularity charts and is poised to take over for fading first wave Old Testament choices such as Zachary.
    • Felicia
      • Origin:

        Latin
      • Meaning:

        "lucky"
      • Description:

        A lacy, lucky name very popular in the Hispanic community a decade ago, less so now.
    • Gisele
      • Description:

        The French variation of Giselle was made famous by the spectacular Brazilian supermodel Gisele Bundchen.
    • Isadora
      • Origin:

        Greek
      • Meaning:

        "gift of Isis"
      • Description:

        Why is Isabella megapopular while Isadora goes virtually ignored? Too close a tie with tragic modern dancer Isadora Duncan (born Angela Isadora), who was done in by her long flowing scarf, perhaps, or with fusty male version Isidore. But we think Isadora is well worth reevaluating as an Isabella alternative. Quirky couple singer Bjork and artist Matthew Barney did just that and named their daughter Isadora. Isidora would be an alternative, just as proper but not quite as charming spelling--the one used as the spelling of a fourth century saint's name.
    • Isolde
      • Leah
        • Origin:

          Hebrew
        • Meaning:

          "weary"
        • Description:

          Strong but sweet, Leah is a classic name that doesn’t feel dull or dusty. It’s got plenty of dignity, grace, and pluck, making it a solid choice in the 21st century.
      • Leonard
        • Origin:

          German
        • Meaning:

          "brave lion"
        • Description:

          Leonard is the name of several saints, including one who is the patron saint of childhood, and another medieval saint who's the patron of prisoners--known for freeing prisoners he deemed worthy of God. Popular from 1900 to 1930, Leonard is perhaps more notable for those who dropped the name when they entered show biz than those who kept it: former Leonards include Roy Rogers and Tony Randall. Two musical Leonards did keep their names though--composer-conductor Leonard Bernstein and poet-singer Leonard Cohen. Leonard Woolf was the husband and publisher of great English novellist Virginia Woolf. These days, modern parents tend to prefer Leo or the romantic Italian Leonardo, especially since Leonard does not get pronounced with the trendy "Leo" sound.