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100+ Four Syllable Boy Names

  1. JedidiahHeart
    • Origin:

      Hebrew
    • Meaning:

      "beloved of the Lord"
    • Description:

      Jedidiah, an Old Testament name with a touch of Gunsmoke-era western panache, is right in line to be revived along with the other biblical -iah names.
  2. EmilioHeart
    • Origin:

      Spanish and Italian variation of Emil
    • Meaning:

      "rival"
    • Description:

      Dashing and popular Italian and Spanish favorite, as is Emiliano.
  3. ZachariahHeart
    • Origin:

      Hebrew, form of Zechariah
    • Meaning:

      "the Lord has remembered"
    • Description:

      This distinguished name still feels a bit ancient, but with the rise of such former graybeards as Jeremiah and Elijah, it also sounds child-friendly again, as does the Latin-Greek form Zacharias.
  4. AntonioHeart
    • Origin:

      Spanish and Italian variation of Anthony
    • Description:

      Antonio is a Shakespearean favorite -- the Bard used it in no less than five of his plays, and has long been a ubiquitous classic in Spanish-speaking countries, where the nickname Tonio is also prevalent. Antonio is also among an elite group of perennially popular names in the US, where it has always been among the boys' Top 1000 since baby name record-keeping started in 1880.
  5. MontgomeryHeart
    • Origin:

      Norman
    • Meaning:

      "man power"
    • Description:

      This image of this distinguished Anglo-Scottish surname, drawn from the French place name of the ancient castle of Saint Foi de Montgomery, is rapidly shifting from fusty and formal to cool. And dashing short form Monty (or Monte) nudges it to cute.
  6. AlessioHeart
    • Origin:

      Italian variation of Alexis
    • Meaning:

      "defender"
    • Description:

      Alessio, simpler than the related Alessandro, would be a welcome settler here.
  7. HoratioHeart
    • Origin:

      English variation of Latin Horatius
    • Meaning:

      "hour, time"
    • Description:

      Like Horace, Horatio is a variation on the Latin Horatius, but its Shakespearean and optimistic Horatio Alger pedigree makes it an attractive up-and-comer, especially with its cool final o. A modern reference is the charismatic TV character Horatio Caine played by David Caruso in CSI: Miami.
  8. AzariahHeart
    • Origin:

      Hebrew
    • Meaning:

      "helped by God"
    • Description:

      Azariah is a rarely used biblical name that moves way beyond Adam and Abraham; its pleasant sound makes it no surprise that parents have discovered it in recent years.
  9. ValentinoHeart
    • Origin:

      Latin
    • Meaning:

      "strength, health"
    • Description:

      A dashing, dramatic and romantic Italian surname, associated with early movie heartthrob Rudolph, and later with Italian fashion designer Valentino (Garavani). Also the name of an early Roman saint, whose feast day marks the beginning of spring. Ricky Martin chose it for one of his twin boys.
  10. GiovanniHeart
    • Origin:

      Italian variation of John
    • Meaning:

      "God is gracious"
    • Description:

      Giovanni is a venerable Italian classic that suddenly sounds fresh and cool. Ubiquitous in Italy, it has countless notable namesakes, from writer Boccaccio to designer Versace (nn Gianni).
  11. LucianoHeart
    • Origin:

      Italian variation of Lucian
    • Meaning:

      "light"
    • Description:

      A vibrant, operatic Latin choice.
  12. DemetriusHeart
    • Origin:

      Greek
    • Meaning:

      "follower of Demeter"
    • Description:

      Classical and Shakespearean name that may appeal if you like your names long, flowing and multicultural.
  13. NicodemusHeart
    • Origin:

      Greek
    • Meaning:

      "victory of the people"
    • Description:

      This rarely used New Testament name could make an unusual route to the cool nickname Nico. Nicodemus (Noddy) Boffin is a character in the Dickens novel Our Mutual Friend.
  14. JebediahHeart
    • Origin:

      Hebrew
    • Meaning:

      "beloved friend"
    • Description:

      Like its better known cousin Jedidiah, Jebediah is one of those four-syllable Old Testament names that is being shorn of its long white-bearded image, with the help of its modern-sounding Jeb nickname.
  15. TheloniousHeart
    • Origin:

      Latinized variation of German Tillman, “one who plows the earth”
    • Description:

      One of the coolest of names, thanks to legendary jazz pianist Thelonious Sphere Monk, who inherited this Latin-sounding German name from his father. It has been used very sparingly since the 1960's, with just a sprinkling of baby boys receiving the name each year, though it's one of the unique baby names we predict will get much less unique as more parents embrace its quirky charms.
  16. OleanderHeart
    • Origin:

      Botanical name
    • Description:

      The name of this pretty Mediterranean shrub is reminiscent of popular classic Oliver, and interestingly its etymology appears to overlap too: oleander most likely derives from Greek rhododendron “rose tree”, with its form successively influenced by laurea “laurel” and olea “olive tree”.
  17. OlivierHeart
    • Origin:

      French
    • Meaning:

      "olive tree"
    • Description:

      More and more frequently heard as the Gallic version of Oliver, Olivier could be seen as a tribute to the great British actor, Sir Laurence O.
  18. EndymionHeart
    • Origin:

      Greek
    • Meaning:

      "dive into, enter"
    • Description:

      The name of a mythically handsome youth – loved by Selene, the moon, who bore him fifty daughters.
  19. SalvatoreHeart
    • Origin:

      Italian variation of Salvator
    • Meaning:

      "savior"
    • Description:

      For every Tio Salvador in a Latino family, there's a Zio Salvatore in an Italian one. Having always ranked in the US Top 1000, it is in danger of falling off the charts very soon.
  20. EliseoHeart
    • Origin:

      Italian and Spanish variation of Elisha
    • Meaning:

      "God is my salvation"
    • Description:

      This Latinate name would have no problem fitting into an American classroom. It has made frequent appearances in the US Top 1000 over the last several decades. Borne by several Spanish saints, it boasts both a rhythmic sound and popular o-ending.